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March 4, 2013 | by  | in Uncategorised |
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Enrolments Go Down

Universities left unsatisfied

Student enrolments to study in 2011 were the lowest in nearly ten years, Statistics New Zealand figures show.

The number of students signing up for university and other post-secondary school courses dropped 7.4 per cent from 2011 to 2010, from 465,648 to 431,313.

In the past few years cuts in financial support have hit students, including tightening eligibility for the student allowance and cutting the postgraduate student allowance.

Former VUWSA president Bridie Hood said at the time of the figures’ release that the price of education is the reason behind the decrease in enrolments, and the change in attitude toward enrolling.

“I think it’s starting to impact on students’ decision of whether to go into tertiary education.”

Current Victoria University student Hannah Austin Smellie also thinks there is a correlation between the declining rate of enrolment and the lack of financial support students are receiving from the government.

“I think it’s a bit shithouse really that less people are enrolling and furthering their education, students need all the support we can get.”

Figures obtained from the latest University Council meeting show that as of 10 February, there were 54 less full time student equivalents at Victoria than the same time last year.

 

Alex Lewin

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:   I wanted to write this piece, in order to connect to all tauira within the University, with the hope that we can all remind ourselves that we are a part of an environment which is valuable, no matter our culture, our beliefs or our skin colour. The ultimate purpose of this