Viewport width =
April 29, 2013 | by  | in News |
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

Omnishambles Turns Clusterfuck

The Student Forum failed to reach quorum at its Monday 16 April meeting, with only ten members showing up to partake in the University-managed student representational body.

Without the 20 student members needed to officially open the meeting, the election of key student representative positions to the University Council and Academic Board could not take place. As the next meeting isn’t scheduled until the end of May, the failure of the Forum to appoint such positions effectively sends half a year’s worth of student representation down the drain.

The Forum—theoretically made up of 35 positions—has struggled to find students willing to partake. It has also had trouble maintaining members, with VUWSA, Ngāi Tauira and the Pasifika Students’ Council leaving due to repeated concerns with the Forum’s democratic nature, accountability to students and lack of mana not being addressed. The University had previously proposed that should quorum not be met, the occasion “be used to explore informally any issues of concern raised by the representatives that are present.”

The usual discussions went round in circles, jumping between confusion and awkward silences. One hour later the meeting ended with the arrival of pizza, which, as PGSA President Neal Barber explained, was “the most important part of the meeting”. The next meeting of the Student Forum is set down for 21 May.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

About the Author ()

Comments are closed.

Recent posts

  1. Losing Metiria
  2. Blind Spot
  3. Aspie on Campus
  4. Issue 17
  5. Australian Sexual Assault Report Released
  6. The Swimmer
  7. European Students Association Re-emerges
  8. Can of Worms!
  9. A Monster Calls — J. A. Bayona
  10. Snapchat is a Girl’s Best Friend and Other Shit Chat
LOCKED-OUT

Editor's Pick

Locked Out

: - SPONSORED - The first prisons in New Zealand were established in the 1840s, and there are now 18 prisons nationwide.¹ According to the Department of Corrections, the prison population was 10,035 in March — of which, 50.9% are Māori, 32.0% are Pākehā, 11.0% are Pasifika, a