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April 29, 2013 | by  | in News |
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See You at the Bottom?

The Ministry of Health has popped the cork on a survey of New Zealand’s drinking patterns, revealing fewer people are drinking and younger people are drinking more responsibly.

The overall rate of hazardous drinking for the 18- to 24-year-old group has fallen from 49 per cent in 2006-07 to 36 per cent in 2011-12, though remains more common than in any other age group.

Amongst all past-year drinkers, one in five (19 per cent) had hazardous drinking patterns, down four percent from 2006-07. Hazardous drinking is defined as a drinking pattern that carries a risk of physical or mental harm, or having harmful social effects to the drinker or others.

The Ministry of Health found that among past-year drinkers, men aged 18 to 24 are at higher risk of hazardous drinking (44 per cent) than women in the same age group (26 per cent).

More people are engaging in teetotalism, with the survey’s findings showing the percentage of adults who had consumed alcohol in the past 12 months dropped from 84 per cent in 2006-07 to 80 per cent in 2011-12.

Associate Minister of Health Peter Dunne believes the results are a step in the right direction.

“There is some good work going on in the sector, and these are encouraging results,” he said. In 2008, there were 10,290 admissions to New Zealand hospitals caused by drinking.

The report can be read in full at the Ministry of Health website, health.govt.nz.

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