Viewport width =
April 15, 2013 | by  | in News |
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

Week that Wasn’t: POLS113 Students “Agree to Disagree”

Following a class discussion on the role of the executive in the legislative process last Friday, POLS113 students Phineas Taylor-Thomas and Francis de Boer “agreed to disagree,” sources told Salient.

Discussion began during a lecture on the separation of powers, a common democratic maxim which acts as a check on unbridled government power. After hearing a 20-minute outline on the concept’s history, de Boer soon formulated an intense support for John Calvin’s 16th-century doctrine and immediately raised his hand.

“I identify with Calvin, but I also respect others may have different opinions on the matter,” said de Boer.

Sources indicate Taylor-Thomas nodded to himself, before checking that day’s INTP118 notes; a class from which he’d just arrived.

“In the 17th century, Thomas Hobbes rejected the separation of powers and after careful consideration and research, so do I,” announced Taylor-Thomas in reply.

“Though, I see the merit in your stance,” he soon added.

The brief retort was met with enthusiastic attention from the rest of the lecture theatre, who politely awaited de Boer’s rejoinder.

“I’ve considered your points, and it’s clear to me that while we both accept each other’s standpoints as valid, they are fundamentally incompatible,” de Boer replied, finishing with a small bow in Taylor-Thomas’ direction.

Senior Lecturer Fabian White was pleased with the rare self-application of Politics students to discussion questions.

“I thought Calvin and Hobbes would be a bit advanced for the first-years, but they’re doing very well.”

Victoria’s School of Political Science and International Relations is currently experiencing a worrying trend wherein an increasing ability of students to put aside underlying political beliefs and evaluate each idea on its merits has been observed. Answers have become increasingly brief, and respect in lectures has improved exponentially.

“I’m really scared about our future politicians trying to forge a culture of bipartisanship,” PSIR Head Patrick Wiley told Salient.

The news comes in a week where not a single Mathematics student was spotted wearing sneans.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

About the Author ()

Comments are closed.

Recent posts

  1. Interview with Dr Rebecca Kiddle
  2. The Party Line
  3. Te Ara Tauira
  4. Robotic Legs, “Inspiration”, and Disability in Film
  5. VICUFO
  6. VUWSA
  7. One Ocean
  8. Steel and Sting
  9. RE: Conceptual Romance
  10. Voluntary WOF a Step in the Right Direction
redalert1

Editor's Pick

RED

: - SPONSORED - I have always thought that red was a sneaky, manipulative colour for Frank Jackson to choose in his Black and White Mary thought experiment. It is the colour of the most evocative emotions, love and hate, and symbolises some of the most intense human experiences, bi