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August 5, 2013 | by  | in News |
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Students Shelving at University

Victoria University students have taken a leaf from Canterbury’s book by forming a Wellington Student Volunteer Army (SVA) to help with post-earthquake cleanups.

Members of the SVA helped clean up the Law Library in the Old Government Buildings on Friday 26 July, and assisted staff putting books back on the shelves. More than 400 students have joined the group.

“Feedback from library staff is that the students were very valuable helpers and did an excellent job,” a University spokesperson told Salient.

Only a small number of the Library’s total book collection was dislodged. While all library shelving is seismically balanced, library collections are on open shelves, and there is no cost-effective solution to prevent books from coming off shelves that does not impede ease of access for students and staff.

“At the Law Library, one of the three levels was affected, with books on the top two shelves being dislodged. No books came off library shelves at the Kelburn, Te Aro or Karori campuses,” said University Librarian Noelle Nelson.

To join the SVA and help out in other quake-affected parts of Wellington email wellington@sva.org.nz, or visit facebook.com/svawgtn.

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