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August 19, 2013 | by  | in Arts Film |
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We Are Aliens

We Are Aliens begins with the question, “Are We Alone?” Well, yeah. Everyone’s alone. The ‘alone’ they’re aiming for is the other kind of alone. The larger scale. Alone as a planet. Alone in this universe. Is there life outside of Earth? We Are Aliens is here to answer (sort of) some of just that. The answer is probably yes. But we all knew that anyway. You take a journey through space; it’s super-realistic.

The film is narrated by Rupert Grint (a.k.a. Ron Weasley), which certainly adds a whole lot. Not exactly comparable with the Harry Potter franchise, but his voice is very soothing and suitable to the whole spacial experience.

I went with a friend, although it would probably be great as a quintessential date destination—“Hey babe, lets go look at the stars tonight” *vomits*. Ross and Rachel first had sex at a stardome. That could be you. The friend I went with said it was the best 3D experience she had ever had; she also stated it was more informative than Science class. Damn.

It’s supposedly from 2012, although the animation gave off a distinctly 2003 vibe. This really wasn’t such a bad thing though. The whole experience reminded me of primary-school science trips to the Auckland Stardome. Which were always a bunch of fun. Learning new things is exciting. Did you know planets need to be in a ‘Goldilocks zone’ to sustain any kind of life? Thought not.

This will most likely be as close to space as you are ever going to get. Robots are usually the point of call for exploring new territories. According to the film, most other planets are hundreds if not thousands of years away, so for most of us, that would be a one-way trip to nowhere.

After the movie, a projection of the night sky is displayed above us. An expert then teaches the audience some more about the constellations with a red laser pointer. It was all very exciting. We then took a journey past Earth, and out of the Milky Way. This made me feel very small and insignificant. Overall, the atmosphere was very out-of-this-world. I can spacely say I will definitely be returning.

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