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September 30, 2013 | by  | in Arts Film |
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One Direction: This Is Us

Let’s face it, like almost everyone on the planet (including my dad), you probably love One Direction. Why else would you be reading this review? Unless you read the title, rolled your eyes and decided to read this so you can feel superior and scoff at the masterpiece that is Morgan Spurlock’s One Direction: This Is Us. Well, firstly, don’t be a hater. Secondly, I’d bet that if you saw this movie with an open mind and an open heart, you would change your tune.

I went to see the movie with a group of five other friends on a Saturday night dressed in our best #yopro attire, where we totally spent 20 minutes before the movie taking selfies with the life-size cutouts of the boys. We all had a fucking amazing time. This film has a lot to offer any degree of One Direction fan, from the total newbie who would love to learn more about their origin story, to the wise and weathered 1D fan who already knows all of their favourite bands and X Factor audition songs.

This Is Us has a decent selection of live concert footage from their recent tour. Mostly the hits and fun jams (although move along ‘Little Things’, you’re bringing down the tone). Despite being known for foregoing the classic boy-band schtick of choreographed dance routines, One Direction put on an entertaining concert. Watching them prance around the stage and mess with each other is a good time, and you’re probably going to have to stop yourself from singing along loudly to ‘Kiss You’ in the theatre (because damn it, you still have some dignity!) Watching the live performances makes me jealous of the younger members in the crowd who get to claim 1D as their first concert; the only thing I remember about my first concert, 5ive, is waiting in line for the bathroom at TSB Arena. If it was half the show that One Direction put on, I feel like my memories would never fade. For bonus points, please look out for a shot of a Dad hating his life in one of the shots panning through the crowd.

The movie does a good job of showing 1D’s fun side through interviews and candid moments; however, there are a few serious clips thrown in that make you suddenly very glad that the 3D glasses you’re wearing act like blinders, so no one can see you starting to tear up when Zayn buys his mum a house. But there are plenty of great gags in the movie, of the boys just messing around and being a bit stupid; you can definitely tell they’re great bros. There are particular moments of hilarity that are so solid that an (unnamed) friend actually fell off her seat because she just couldn’t deal with it. There’s ample shots of the boys shirtless or getting changed, so don’t worry if you thought it’d be lacking in that aspect of important cinematography. The quota is definitely filled.

The 3D aspect is completely unnecessary, and I think that’s why I love it. They’ve thrown in a bunch of special effects throughout the live performances, which might be borderline ridiculous, but that’s the appeal—they turn into superheroes at one point. It’s awesome.

If you’re not moved when the boys’ families are interviewed, or crack at least a tiny smile when they disguise themselves and surprise fans, then you are probably dead inside; this movie is a wonderful time and will lift your spirits even higher than 1D’s tallest quiff. I recommend seeing it with a group of like-minded friends, and sit in the back row so no one can judge you when you lose your shit. If you must see it by yourself, it’s alright! You’re among friends here; no one will judge you for your love.

The movie is obviously made with the fans in mind, but I guarantee that even if you aren’t a fan going in, you’ll probably be walking out of the theatre screaming about how you’ve never been a Liam person, but This Is Us made you see the light.

10,000 stars = everyone.

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