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March 31, 2014 | by  | in Being Well Opinion |
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C B T

This instalment of CBT was brought to you by polarised thinking and assumptions that have not been challenged since the individual was eight years old]

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) tells us that disturbing events are sometimes more disturbing for us due to irrational beliefs we hold.

CBT tells us that disturbing events feel real in our stomachs, but this can sometimes change by challenging irrational beliefs we hold.

CBT tells us that the shitty individual in question has an essay which is two weeks late and a stomach that is sore.

I’m on the bus. I’m stress-eating my hair because when I stress-eat the fatty thumb joints of my hands it leaves teeth marks. My fingernails scrape my scalp. The bus stops at University and my thoughts are like start your work, scummy girl and be great or be shit. It is a fact that my essay was due two weeks ago and this is eating into my stomach and making me feel like heavy. I’m feeling like heavy and eating my hair and entering the library and this essay needs to be polished enough to ensure you get an A even though it is late and if not, you are wasted, and wasting. Oh also, you’re boring. I’m scrolling my doc on those food-covered computers and you may as well hand in nothing and I’m feeling constrained in my chest like I’ve been living for 40 years, I’m feeling my guts and their bugs and you hand in great or you’re shit.

I’m pulling strands of my hair in the bathroom and wondering why I need to read every single JSTOR article on the topic before I can plan my introduction and you’re boring but yes, but: what if I could hand in an essay that isn’t totally perfect but no, great or shit, but what if I can change this belief I have about myself and my products and my essays and be like – there’s grey. And my thoughts are like: woah, okay, okay. Wait. My thoughts are like: okay, teach yourself to confront your polar beliefs and savour these ‘reflective’ moments like Nicki in ‘Moment 4 Life’ because they are rare but clear, and go to your computer and finish your essay and hand in a shitty thing because that is sometimes okay. You’re not wasting.

CBT tells us that irrational beliefs feel real in our stomachs, but they can sometimes be challenged.

Cognitive behavioural therapy is a talk therapy used to treat disruptive thinking as well as diagnosed mental illnesses. Each CBT client will use it in their own way, and students who think it could help them can visit Student Health.

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