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March 17, 2014 | by  | in News |
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Decrease Sees Theses Cease

Preliminary postgraduate enrolments at Victoria have dropped 13 per cent for 2014, but the University says it has not noticed a drop.

The drop comes in the wake of the introduction of cuts to postgraduate allowances. The cuts were announced in 2012’s Budget and implemented at the beginning of 2013.

Currently, postgraduate enrolments are the lowest they have been in five years. The University has said it has not noticed a drop in postgraduate enrolments. The current figures are not finalised, as postgraduate students doing research programmes can enrol throughout the year.

VUWSA President Sonya Clark said that, while numbers may yet go up, there was still an issue of equity raised by cutting allowances.

“Now we are starting to see the real effects of this short-sighted policy,” Clark said.

Megan Irving, a Classics student Salient spoke to, stated that the allowance cuts would turn her off doing the postgraduate degree that she had planned to do.

She said that the lack of financial support would make life hard for her, and as her postgraduate degree is offered by other universities, she would seriously consider moving somewhere else to study.

“There’s nothing keeping me here. If they keep cutting the budget, more people are just going to go elsewhere. So basically, they can just go suck a dick.”

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