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Issue , 2014

The Nature Issue

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News

  • Parks and Reclamation

  • Government Prunes Grapevine

  • Not So Wise Council

  • Uni Council Reform

  • Music to Vic’s Ears

  • CoRE Funding Changes Ignore Core Problems

  • Ovary Represented

  • Environmental Politics

  • Bus Wankers

  • Features

  • What Kind of Environmentalist Are You?

    What Kind of Environmentalist Are You? A quiz.

    by

  • So Crazy It Might Just Work

    Time is passing quickly, and our climate is deteriorating at an exponential, irreparable rate. Now is the time for radical solutions.

    by

  • Russel Norman

    An interview with Russel Norman, the co-leader of the Green Party.

    by

  • Plotting Plants

    I would like to think that I am an ‘environmentalist’, in reality, I can barely keep a household pot plant alive…

    by

  • Paying Gold to be Green

    The ethical eco-life is for sale, and it’s expensive.

    by

  • Celia Wade-Brown

    An interview with Wellington Mayor, Celia Wade-Brown

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  • Holly Walker

    An interview with Holly Walker, a Green list MP in the Hutt South electorate.

    by

  • Genie Genie

    What do anti-GE campaigners and climate-change deniers have in common?

    by

  • Imbak Canyon – Building a Bridge

    I found myself standing in the middle of Imbak Canyon, Borneo…

    by

  • Blame It On The Sunshine

    For most of human history, what the weather was doing immediately impacted our survival…

    by

  • A-Pathetic Mindset

    I promise that I do give a shit that the planet is hurtling towards its own demise.

    by

  • What Kind of Environmentalist Are You?

    What Kind of Environmentalist Are You? A quiz.

    by

  • So Crazy It Might Just Work

    Time is passing quickly, and our climate is deteriorating at an exponential, irreparable rate. Now is the time for radical solutions.

    by

  • Russel Norman

    An interview with Russel Norman, the co-leader of the Green Party.

    by

  • Plotting Plants

    I would like to think that I am an ‘environmentalist’, in reality, I can barely keep a household pot plant alive…

    by

  • Paying Gold to be Green

    The ethical eco-life is for sale, and it’s expensive.

    by

  • Celia Wade-Brown

    An interview with Wellington Mayor, Celia Wade-Brown

    by

  • Holly Walker

    An interview with Holly Walker, a Green list MP in the Hutt South electorate.

    by

  • Genie Genie

    What do anti-GE campaigners and climate-change deniers have in common?

    by

  • Imbak Canyon – Building a Bridge

    I found myself standing in the middle of Imbak Canyon, Borneo…

    by

  • Blame It On The Sunshine

    For most of human history, what the weather was doing immediately impacted our survival…

    by

  • A-Pathetic Mindset

    I promise that I do give a shit that the planet is hurtling towards its own demise.

    by

  • Arts and Science

  • Sustainable Style

    It is easy to choose clothes based on cut, colour, print, and what’s ‘on trend’. But how often do you consider where your clothing comes from and what impact it has on the environment? While clothing lines made from sustainable fabrics are also an excuse to slap huge price tags on new products, it could well be worth the extra $$$ in future decades.

    The Good Stuff.

    As you probably know, anything with the term ‘organic’ is usually a good thing. But how does this translate to fashion?

    Cotton is one of the most popular fabrics used for clothing due to its versatility and the huge amounts which can be produced from one crop. But if you’ve ever read The Grapes of Wrath, you’ll know that this plant is easily damaged by rain and insects. Because of this, fertilisers and pesticides are used in staggering quantities to sustain a good yield, making it the most pesticide-reliant plant product in the world. An organic option will guarantee that your cotton products have not been treated with any chemical products, including bleach and non-plant-based dyes.

    Alternatively, bamboo and hemp products are becoming increasingly popular among designers. These plants are durable against both weather and insects, and they grow quickly in warm climates. Because there is little need to use pesticide or fertiliser on these crops, you can feel reasonably confident that these fabrics have been produced in a sustainable manner, even if they aren’t stamped with the organic label.

    The Bad Stuff.

    As a basic guide, beware of fabrics with the letter Y in them: nylon, polyester, rayon. Nylon and polyester are made from petrochemicals, the use of which is a central cause of global environmental problems. The production process for these fabrics also uses large amounts of fresh water, and even if you were to purge your wardrobe of these fabrics, they are non-biodegradable!

    Rayon is slightly more sustainable as it is manufactured from wood pulp, but until producers can find a way to prepare the fabric without the use of sulfuric acid and caustic soda, its cons far outweigh its pros.

    The Best Stuff.

    Do a little research into your favourite clothing brands. If you find out that their products are not made from sustainable fabrics, simply buy their clothes second-hand from somewhere like Recycle Boutique or Trade Me, meaning that your precious money is not going directly to the company. In general, though, second-hand shopping should be encouraged at all times.

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  • In Review: Once We Built a Tower

    Once We Built a Tower is the latest in a run of brilliant Bacchanals productions lighting up the Wellington scene. The element which shone throughout this and several other recent productions by the same company – The Clouds, Gunplay, All’s Well that Ends Well – is the witty and engaging spirit of the cast. The script itself, written for this production by Dean Parker, is a wordy and repetitive one; however, moments of real joy were found in the set design and manipulation, and the joyful play between the ensemble actors.

    The narrative follows “the building of the Waitaki hydro-electric dam near Kurow in the late-1920s and how its revolutionary medical scheme helped the 1935 Labour government create the Welfare State we take for granted today” (thebacchanals.net). Although this made for a challenging and relevant piece of theatre (it is, after all, election year), this political theme did weigh heavy in the atmosphere of the theatre, and was driven home a little too hard during our second act. What began as heartening political common-sense campaigning by likable, charming characters, slowly became scene after scene of frustrating political warfare which, although realistic, was, for one audience member, “a bit too shouty”. Although the themes and messages were of value, towards the end of this two-hour production, the atmosphere descended into chastisement over provocation, a fault which I think lies primarily in the script, but still let down this brilliant production.

    The set, consisting almost entirely of old suitcases, was clever, versatile, and made for beautiful scene transitions and play between actors as they threw them back and forth, built their homes and a dam from them. This basic set was brought to life by the beautiful voices and instrumental music of the players throughout, which appears to be a common theme in Bacchanals productions, making them an absolute joy to watch.

    Our protagonists – Kirsty Bruce as Ethel McMillan, Alex Greig as Dr Gervan McMillan, Brianne Kerr as Frances Nordmeyer, Michael Trigg as Arnold Nordmeyer, and Michael Ness as Michael Joseph Savage – served us well with consistent, energetic and often comedic acting, which helped the pacing of this wordy piece. The supporting roles, from Alice May Connolly, Joe Dekkers-Reihana, Hilary Penwarden, Charlotte Pleasants, Jean Sergent and Aidan Weekes, were fantastic as always, with charming play, quick wit, clear delivery, and a great sense of enthusiasm in their performances. It is not often that in a production where you watch four separate actors poo on stage, the air is still endearing, especially given that we watch another cast member shovel their wares away immediately afterwards.

    This is not your last chance to view this production, however, as there are murmurs of an upcoming tour of the show, which I would recommend to any politically minded theatre-goer as a tight, charismatic piece by a well-respected company. Overall, this show was interesting and compelling, primarily due to the skill of the players, and the endearingly small-time beginnings of the protagonists. Pre-show and interval entertainment was jubilant, and special mention must be made of the hilarious performances from Brianne Kerr, Michael Trigg and Jean Sergent in these breaks and throughout the show. Musicians Ellie Stewart, Hilary Penwarden and David Lawrence were wonderful to listen to, and added to the production without distracting from the main action, which is a credit to any ensemble.

     

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  • Topographies

    In the late 1830s, when plans of Wellington were being drawn up, the New Zealand Company set aside a belt of green space in the hills around the central city for public use. In 1873, 1061 acres of land was officially gifted to the people of Wellington. Since then, areas have been developed, but a remarkable amount of it has remained intact. Go far enough west, or north, and the city just stops.

    Skip ahead 140 years, outside Wellington, outside the Town Belt. Success, in artistic terms, is dependent on who can afford to get attention; who can afford access to institutions, dealers, critics; to fund themselves through unpaid internships. The internet was supposed to moderate this imbalance, the great democratiser of our time. Anyone can register a domain; anyone can, in theory, acquire an audience.

    At the end of this year, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers will release a number of suffixes, or gTLDs (generic top-level domains), such as .pizza, .sex, and .art. They plan to license individual gTLDs to private companies.

    e-flux is an artist-run organisation that publishes a curated newsletter of event listings to around 50,000 subscribers. In their application for control of the .art gTLD, e-flux describes itself as “an established authority in the field of art.” Their proposal for control of the .art domain would allow them to act as gatekeepers, ensuring, so they say, content is “relevant, genuine, and of high quality.” Their plan for the gTLD involves two stages: the first would be to invite a select group of institutions, curators and artists to join. Once .art has established itself as a valuable asset, e-flux will then have discretion over who is allowed in – thus inflating the value by artificially reducing supply.

    If this seems unwieldy, that’s because it is. Allow me to claw myself back. The similarity between the Town Belt and .art lies in the ostensible generosity of both proposals. It seems noble now, if one ignores the fact that the New Zealand Company was giving away land that didn’t belong to them, to invest so much in the preservation of an idyll so close to a metropolitan centre. The problem is altruism on this scale doesn’t really exist. Space itself was one of the most potent selling tactics used to encourage early settlers. Consider England the physical art world, with its overcrowding, massive inflation of land prices, and nonexistent access to opportunity. Early Wellington, in all its abundance, in its desire both to emulate and to form for itself a new set of rules, as an attempt to flatten hierarchies. The online landscape can’t reflect the physical because no area of internet real estate is more valuable than others. e-flux’s .art proposal would shift this balance.

    Consider space, necessarily, as a site of conflict. Consider many different elements, all in combat for the foreground. Consider these things and you may be able to imagine how Jake Walker’s paintings operate. His current exhibition at City Gallery’s Hirschfeld Gallery (on display until 13 April) features a series of small canvases, some housed in fired-clay frames, accompanied by several sculptures. The paintings seem wrought, almost at odds with their own medium. Black paint is layered on thick and heavy, revealing the possibility of an image underneath, unearthing the process by which the work is made; structures upon structures, cannibalising each other. There’s evidence of Walker’s relationship with the architecture of Ian Athfield (Walker spent long periods of time at the Athfields’ Kilbirnie house as a child), in the protruding geometric shapes, speckled creams and pale blues, the way material elements are in dialogue with their environment, while refusing to synchronise with it. The paintings are produced horizontally, almost built, with a kind of clumsy calculation, with contour lines, peaks and crevasses. They resemble the way the edges of the city are built up, layered, torn down and half built again, with large open spaces for open views – competing for an atmosphere of paradise close to civilisation.

    It’s unclear yet whether e-flux will be granted the rights to .art. It may well go to a company completely uninterested in artistic hierarchies. As for Wellington’s Town Belt, it may remain, or Wellington may expand. To speak in defence of it this late, however, is to risk defending by association e-flux’s proposal (since I have relied so heavily on the very tenuous comparison), but there’s comfort found in the understanding that the city is finite. Auckland sprawls. London goes on for days. Walker’s work acts as a meditation on this ceasing: for all the density in his painted landscapes, the ceramics, in their gracelessness, bring the paintings home, situating them in a place more comfortable.

     

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  • A Guide to NZ Literary Journals

    Yes, there are literary journals in this country! Yes, people read them. No, they’re not pretentious or dull, or only contributed to by old, white men. Yes, they’re friendly and quite wonderful. If you’re a bit of a creative writer and you want to get your short stories, memoirs, essays or poems out there into the world, think about submitting to any or all of these publications. Literary journals are most keen to publish new work that hasn’t been published before – keep in mind that some won’t even accept a piece that’s appeared on your personal blog before. Read their submission guidelines thoroughly, have a look at past issues to get an idea of what they publish, and it never hurts to get an extra pair of eyes (or two) to look over your work. And if you’re burning to read more from young, emerging New Zealand writers, there’s no better place to look.

    SPORT

    A bedrock of new New Zealand fiction, essays and poetry. Published annually and edited by VUP’s Fergus Barrowman. Accepts contributions from new and already-published New Zealand writers, or those with “a New Zealand connection”. Sport 42, released last week, features work by Bill Manhire, Elizabeth Knox, and past Salient editor Uther Dean. Past copies are all available online through the Electronic Text Centre.

    Submissions: No current deadline, though the next Sport won’t be out until early next year and submissions are welcome.

    http://www.sportmagazine.co.nz/about

    LANDFALL

    The country’s longest-running and best-known journal. It publishes fiction, poetry, biographical and critical essays, cultural commentary, and artwork. It’s published every six months by Otago University Press and also runs an annual essay competition, as well as a biannual award for an original, previously unpublished collection of poetry. Back issues are only available in print; try Arty Bees or Quilter’s.

    Submissions: Next deadline 10 June. Entries for 2014 essay competition close 31 July.

    http://www.otago.ac.nz/press/landfall/index.htm

    TURBINE

    An online journal published annually by VUW’s International Institute of Modern Letters, often presenting new work by creative-writing students of the IIML as well as from established writers. A great place to try if you’ve never been published before. They publish fiction, poetry and non-fiction, and all past issues are available online.

    Submissions: After 1 July but before 20 October.

    http://www.victoria.ac.nz/modernletters/resources/turbine

    HUE & CRY

    A copy of Hue & Cry is like a work of modern art in bound paper form. It’s based in Wellington and presents new writers and artists, published annually. You can find a few old issues at Unity Books.

    Submissions: No current deadline but submissions welcome.

    http://hueandcry.org.nz/

    UP COUNTRY

    A wonderful hybrid of a literary-adventure-science online journal. Features stories and essays about the outdoors and all kinds of outdoorsy, adventurous pursuits. Salient inquired about submission deadlines but received no reply, presumably because everyone at Up Country is tramping. Just go for it.

    http://upcountry.co.nz/

    JAAM

    “Just Another Art Movement” is a print journal founded in 1995 by a writers’ group at Vic. It publishes poetry, fiction and essays by international and established New Zealand writers, but loves the young and emerging ones. It also features photography and wants “experimental, cutting-edge work”.

    Submissions: Next deadline is soon! 31 March for the 2014 issue; the theme is “shorelines”.

    http://jaam.net.nz/

    THE PANTOGRAPH PUNCH

    Not a literary journal, but a fantastic and important online space for long-form written work about New Zealand arts and culture.

    Submissions: Always looking for ideas about pieces relating to arts and culture.

    http://pantograph-punch.com

    SALIENT

    Yeah, we’re not a literary journal, but we are always looking for creative-writing pieces to publish. Poems, short stories, memoirs, travel writing, villanelles, love sonnets, intricate stream-of-consciousness prose poems … we want to read that shit. Email what you’ve got to editors@salient.org.nz.

    BOOKS WE THINK YOU SHOULD READ, #2

    The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
    By Abi Smoker

    Oscar Wilde’s only novel tells the story of Dorian Gray who, at the behest of his enigmatic friend Lord Henry, indulges in an extravagant lifestyle of booze, drugs and sex. Lord Henry determines to have Dorian’s portrait taken so his Michael Fassbender–esque looks are immortalised. Obsessed with his own face, Dorian wants to be youthful forever. He has it made – he can do whatever he wants and never bear the ill effects of his antics – a gift that would be particularly handy after those tragic Saturday nights out, would it not? But aside from the superficial excesses of Mr Gray, The Picture of Dorian Gray is a relevant text that combines wit and warmth with the melancholy undertones of a life lived for the wrong reasons. The preface alone is reason enough to read it: “Those who go beneath the surface do so at their peril.”

    by

  • Johnny Foreigner – You Can Do Better Review

    Maybe I’m too old for Johnny Foreigner; maybe they are too. On my third re-listen, a few hooks are starting to stand out, a few lines are bouncing around my head, a few melodies are surprising me – but it’s not quite there. As they have on everything I’ve heard of them since their excellent debut, Waited Up ‘til It Was Light, Johnny Foreigner kind of sound like their own tribute band.

    But I’m probably being unfair. It’s been years since I worshipped the stop/start, guy/girl, too-punk-to-be-twee but too-earnest-to-be-punk indie pop that Johnny Foreigner excel at. I love their first album too much for anything else they make to seem worthy. Some of these songs have fucking stupid names (‘Le Sigh’ – really?) but they are all pretty good, and full of exactly what I expect from Johnny Foreigner – intensity, honesty, and an uncomfortable level of intimacy.

    Opener ‘Shipping’ is particularly fun, full of energetic chords and a chorus that’s stuck in my head – “I’ll stop shipping you/ when you stop shipping me.” There are other highlights here too – ‘Wifi Beach’, ‘To the Death’ – but not as many as one would hope.

    Johnny Foreigner added another guitarist to their three-piece lineup before this album, and that may be my problem. There just feels like there’s more of it now, like they have to justify his presence by cramming in as many riffs as possible, at the expense of some of the other things that made Johnny Foreigner great. The guitar feels a bit further away from the vocal melodies, possibly because they aren’t coming from the same person any more.

    Then, I’m probably just too old. Maybe I just need to listen to this album a few hundred times, to scream the lyrics to myself as I walk home in the dark, to imagine myself as every member of the band separately. Maybe then I’ll love Johnny Foreigner like I used to.

     

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  • Metronomy – Love Letters Review

    One of the more inexplicable beauties of music is its ability to teleport us to a particular moment, a memory, an emotion. You should not listen to Love Letters if you have recently broken up with someone, are thinking of breaking up with someone, or just generally hate people. It will only intensify your pain.

    Literally every song on this record develops on the themes of heartbreak and rejection. But it’s not just the lyrics – “never wanted, never needed, you said honey, best be leaving” – the melodies are narrow in range and minimalistic, complimenting frontman Joseph Mount’s I’d-rather-be-in-bed style of sadness. As you might have guessed, the harmonies are almost entirely in minor keys, but what is less obvious about Metronomy’s efforts towards cohesiveness is the monotony of the album.

    Remember the days, weeks, potentially months after a breakup, where the feelings of loneliness felt like they were never going to end? It was hard to allow yourself to feel any blip of excitement or genuine happiness, right? That is what Love Letters’ overall structure expresses. There are no rises in tempo, no variations on the steady 4/4 beats, no new melodies, nothing surprising.

    However, while repetition may be idiosyncratic to Metronomy’s sound, the lack of variety across this record is musically inexcusable; the second half of the album is almost a carbon copy of the first. The unwillingness of the band to ‘mix up’ their music across the course of the album leaves a palpable impression of hopelessness, maybe even of laziness.

    :’(

    It really is a shame that there are minor ‘faults’ in this otherwise brilliant concept album. The instrumentation – particularly the use of brass, keys (electric harpsichord!!!) and guitar – were all welcome additions to the mainly electronic act. The guitar solo in ‘The Upsetter’ is a moving highlight, and ‘Boy Racers’ sounds like the theme song from Revenge of the Nerds. Give it a listen, but be careful.

     

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  • Perfect Pussy – Say Yes To Love Review

    Perfect Pussy – Say Yes To Love

    “Since when did we give up? Since when did we say yes to love?”

    Usually, hearing the album-title as a lyric is a moment for wincing. But when the competitively interwoven front of noise that is Perfect Pussy pauses for a second, and the vocalist screeches those words, we’re all with her, if only for a second.

    Fresh off their breakout demo-tape I have lost all desire for feeling, noise-punk band Perfect Pussy have created a 23-minute masterpiece of feedback, loud guitars, and battle-won confidence. This is an angry record, no doubt, but not sad-angry. Happy-angry.

    Vocalist Meredith Graves was defiantly into herself on their last record too (“I AM FULL OF LIGHT/ I AM FULL OF LIGHT”), and just steps it up on their full-length (“AND I WANT TO FUCK MYSELF/ AND I WANT TO EAT MYSELF”). She calls her songs “happy revelations about incendiary events”. When you can make the lyrics out of the sludge and noise – as you suddenly, clearly can at several points throughout the record – they entirely live up to the band name. Visceral, real, and like nothing else. Let me list some: “What am I doing with somebody’s son?” “You can read the story of my last six weeks/ In little black bruises and marks from boys’ teeth.” “We make love and fall so/ And it doesn’t feel good/ It’s not magic, it’s work/ But it’s real and that’s cool.”

    Not that Perfect Pussy are a one-person band. This is a band of texture, of layers of guitar and feedback and drums constantly reasserting themselves within the mix. Often a particularly good riff is just as loud, or louder, than Graves herself. They are loud enough to lose yourself within, loud enough to become a wall of emotion you can use as a mirror instead of a soundtrack.

    This is what it sounds like to get over something, to realise that you are better than the sum of your experiences, that you still have a fuckload to offer the world, and more importantly, yourself. Perfect Pussy will both destroy and rebuild you. This is the record of 2014.

     

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  • 3 Mile Limit Review

    3 Mile Limit
    Directed by Craig Newland
    ✮✮✮✮☆

    The debut feature of director Craig Newland, 3 Mile Limit has made a strong start. It has been officially selected into 11 International Film Festivals, and picked up three awards at the time of print. Based on a true story, familiar to our parents and theirs, but in need of introduction to our generation.

    Lead character Richard (Matt Whelan) tells the New Zealand government “all you play is music by dead people”. Exasperated by the lack of variety in radio, he gathers sales executive Alex (Elliot Wrightson), engineer Morrie (James Crompton) and a team of DJs: Nick (Dan Musgrove), Brendon (Carl Dixon), Tim (Daniel Cresswell) and Paul (Jordan Mooney), to make a change.

    They decide to form their own independent rock’n’roll station.  A series of conflicts, namely from the New Zealand government, prevents this from happening. The determined crew set out to broadcast from a ship in international waters, outside of the 3-mile limit (hence the name).

    The most notable performances are Matt Whelan as Richard and Elliot Wrightson as Alex. Whelan, known from Go Girls and The Most Fun You Can Have Dying, gives a strong portrayal of the leadership and determination shown by the original founder. This is coupled with great anxiety when his dream and relationship with his wife Judy (Belinda Crawley) encounter conflicts. Wrightson gives a powerful and convincing performance as the suave, shrewd sales executive, Alex. He is a match to Whelan’s capability, and proves that he is one to watch in the New Zealand film scene.

    3 Mile Limit is reflective of its 1960s time scheme: the furniture is drab, the technology is old-school and the outfits are smooth. The soundtrack (composed by Tom McLeod) is sleek. An eclectic mix that conveys the moods of rebellion, romance and tension. It also includes some New Zealand ‘60s tracks, and adds energy and context to the film.

    3 Mile Limit is nostalgic, engaging and important. It appeals to the ideals of rebellion, ingenuity and collective purpose. Scenes of storms, arguments and adventure are contrasted with a romantic sub-plot. It is a film you could enjoy with your friends, or you could take your parents too: should be easy enough to persuade them to shout you a ticket.

     

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  • How Clooney Saved Modern Culture Review

    The Monuments Men
    Directed by George Clooney
    ✮✮✮☆☆

    As far as narcissists go, George Clooney does pretty well for himself. In managing to sell sex in Nespresso ads (he makes that coffee sooo drinkable, it’s why I bought one), The Monuments Men proved to be a solid building block in Clooney’s ego. The film featured too many shots of him driving an army car one-handed in Ray-Bans wearing a pretentious moustache. Being the co-writer, producer, director and star of this feature, when Clooney’s character quips about Hitler that “he wanted everything”, it seems somewhat hypocritical. However, as he so thoughtfully states, he is playing the man in charge of saving the “achievements of humanity”, so maybe we should cut him some slack.

    The movie is based on true events poignantly captured by Robert M. Edsel in a novel of the same name. It centres on the extraordinary art crimes committed by the Nazis during WWII, and the group of volunteers who fought to stop them in an effort to preserve Europe’s culture. Clooney revealed in an interview his original desire was to strut around in a WWII movie. This story conveniently provided a novel way to do this, with the added bonus of giving him the opportunity to demonstrate he’s not “just a pretty face” by spouting painfully poetic voiceovers involving metaphors about ash and dust. Unsurprisingly, the objective of recovering lost art gets a little bit lost itself, for the sake of Clooney slamming empty bullet shells onto maps of Germany.

    As a movie in general, the music drives your emotions crazy, with anticlimactic releases after two minutes of tense violins. Matt Damon is annoying, and it’s unconvincing that he’s ever been to the MET let alone been its director. Cate Blanchett reminds you of her Australian origins when her French/bordering-on-Germanic accent slips halfway through. A dead guy blinks; attention to detail.

    However, I will give Clooney some credit. Casting Bill Murray was an excellent choice, revealing the ability to screech a fantastically hilarious “Holy shit”. The blatant cigarette promotion is also somewhat successful where you emerge with the conclusion that in moments of conflict, offering around a smoke is an incredibly effective way of keeping the peace.

    A work of art? Not really. Is it genuine? Doubtful. Has Clooney proved he can do more than be an irresistible force of attractiveness? Depends if his husky voice is enough to win you over. While it would be interesting to see if he knows what a Gustav Klimt painting actually is, I do like the fact that at least he seems to care.

     

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  • About the Author ()

    Salient is a magazine. Salient is a website. Salient is an institution founded in 1938 to cater to the whim and fancy of students of Victoria University. We are partly funded by VUWSA and partly by gold bullion that was discovered under a pile of old Salients from the 40's. Salient welcomes your participation in debate on all the issues that we present to you, and if you're a student of Victoria University then you're more than welcome to drop in and have tea and scones with the contributors of this little rag in our little hideaway that overlooks Wellington.

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    Recent posts

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    1

    Editor's Pick

    In Which a Boy Leaves

    : - SPONSORED - I’ve always been a fairly lucky kid. I essentially lucked out at birth, being born white, male, heterosexual, to a well off family. My life was never going to be particularly hard. And so my tale begins, with another stroke of sheer luck. After my girlfriend sugge