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Issue 7, 2014

The Sex Issue

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News

  • Is it safe for women to walk home at night?

  • What is happening is radio at Victoria?

  • A First Time for Everything

  • A Unlucky Strike

  • FEM-DOMS

  • Broader-Casting

  • Campus Disconnections

  • Is it safe for women to walk home at night?

  • What is happening is radio at Victoria?

  • A First Time for Everything

  • A Unlucky Strike

  • FEM-DOMS

  • Broader-Casting

  • Campus Disconnections

  • Don’t Rape

  • Features

  • onthejob

    On the Job

    Ava has two children, a tertiary education, and her own business.She’s also a sex worker.

    by

  • pornhub

    Porn Hub

    If porn’s so popular, maybe it’s society that’s fucked.

    by

  • lidp

    Light in Dark Places

    [TRIGGER WARNING: Sexual Assault]
    When I was 15 years old, my father got very, very drunk and propositioned me for sex.

    by

  • thatswing

    It don’t mean a thing unless it’s got that swing

    “Last night, my boyfriend fucked another girl,” Isobel told me over a beer.

    by

  • Great Sexpectations

    “For the first time in human history, the images’ power and allure have supplanted that of real naked women. Today, real naked women are just bad porn.”

    by

  • Follow Me but Don’t Follow Me but Please Follow Me

    All you need is a solid profile pic, a large friend circle and the ability to filter out anything said that would detract from the promising other’s attractive features.

    by

  • Interview with the Chancellor

    Salient sat down for a chat about uni council reforms with the university’s big cheese, Chancellor Ian McKinnon.

    by

  • Write Drunk, Edit Sober

    What is it about drugs that spurs a creative mind?

    by

  • Another Special Visitor to Wellington: Angela Kane of the UN

    Dressed simply but elegantly in a green jacket, black skirt and shiny brooch, Angela Kane walks briskly up to the lectern in Laby 118.

    by

  • Adolescent

    strains under the feathers of
    angels. and we smile and caress…

    by

  • 136 km/h

    they walk with bloodshot eyes,
    little dolls. new york smoke tastes like their paper wings,
    icarus-thin feathers, bones made of melting wax

    by

  • onthejob

    On the Job

    Ava has two children, a tertiary education, and her own business.She’s also a sex worker.

    by

  • pornhub

    Porn Hub

    If porn’s so popular, maybe it’s society that’s fucked.

    by

  • lidp

    Light in Dark Places

    [TRIGGER WARNING: Sexual Assault]
    When I was 15 years old, my father got very, very drunk and propositioned me for sex.

    by

  • thatswing

    It don’t mean a thing unless it’s got that swing

    “Last night, my boyfriend fucked another girl,” Isobel told me over a beer.

    by

  • Great Sexpectations

    “For the first time in human history, the images’ power and allure have supplanted that of real naked women. Today, real naked women are just bad porn.”

    by

  • Follow Me but Don’t Follow Me but Please Follow Me

    All you need is a solid profile pic, a large friend circle and the ability to filter out anything said that would detract from the promising other’s attractive features.

    by

  • Interview with the Chancellor

    Salient sat down for a chat about uni council reforms with the university’s big cheese, Chancellor Ian McKinnon.

    by

  • Write Drunk, Edit Sober

    What is it about drugs that spurs a creative mind?

    by

  • Another Special Visitor to Wellington: Angela Kane of the UN

    Dressed simply but elegantly in a green jacket, black skirt and shiny brooch, Angela Kane walks briskly up to the lectern in Laby 118.

    by

  • Adolescent

    strains under the feathers of
    angels. and we smile and caress…

    by

  • 136 km/h

    they walk with bloodshot eyes,
    little dolls. new york smoke tastes like their paper wings,
    icarus-thin feathers, bones made of melting wax

    by

  • Like a Virgin

    Let me dispel the assumption that I made a historical decision not to sleep with anyone: I’ve made a series of chronological decisions not to sleep with certain people.

    by

  • A Cherry Disposition

    I didn’t necessarily intend on ever getting to this position; that is, being a 22-year-old virgin in my fifth year of study.

    by

  • 1 flickin

    Flickin’ the Bean

    Society’s taboo around female masturbation is unhealthy and outdated.

    by

  • _interview prostitiute

    Pulling an All-Nighter

    By day, she is a first-year Politics student; by night, she is a sex worker, to pay off her “stupid debt”.

    by

  • guide to sex

    Salient’s Guide to Queer Sex

    Wherever you sit on the queer spectrum, we’ve got you sorted!

    by

  • Let’s Talk About Sex, Baby.

    (But only if it’s to make mo-ney.)

    by

  • one night

    How to Have a One-Night Stand

    The one-night stand is not for everyone, and should in no way be viewed as a mark of one’s sexual prowess. That being said, the experience of a one-night stand can be empowering, fulfilling, and just a sweet way to bone someone you don’t like enough to go out with.

    by

  • Feminism-Feature Header Image

    Feminism I Love You (But You’re Bringing Me Down)

    I have become disillusioned with feminism as it is conventionally expressed. My faith is waning, constantly put to the test by self-aggrandising sentiments and parochial critique.

    by

  • Marc Fallis’ Good Fullacio – a Kiwi Bloke’s Guide to Oral Sex

    Mate, I have lived a life of quiet desperation. Sure, I’ve had some financial success (well, more than my mate Matthew—poor bastard thought people would pay to clean their own cars). I made some fucking juice money, even brought out a line of smoothies. But none of this smoothies out the hole in my heart. […]

    by

  • onthejob

    On the Job

    Ava has two children, a tertiary education, and her own business.She’s also a sex worker.

    by

  • pornhub

    Porn Hub

    If porn’s so popular, maybe it’s society that’s fucked.

    by

  • lidp

    Light in Dark Places

    [TRIGGER WARNING: Sexual Assault]
    When I was 15 years old, my father got very, very drunk and propositioned me for sex.

    by

  • thatswing

    It don’t mean a thing unless it’s got that swing

    “Last night, my boyfriend fucked another girl,” Isobel told me over a beer.

    by

  • Great Sexpectations

    “For the first time in human history, the images’ power and allure have supplanted that of real naked women. Today, real naked women are just bad porn.”

    by

  • Follow Me but Don’t Follow Me but Please Follow Me

    All you need is a solid profile pic, a large friend circle and the ability to filter out anything said that would detract from the promising other’s attractive features.

    by

  • Interview with the Chancellor

    Salient sat down for a chat about uni council reforms with the university’s big cheese, Chancellor Ian McKinnon.

    by

  • Write Drunk, Edit Sober

    What is it about drugs that spurs a creative mind?

    by

  • Another Special Visitor to Wellington: Angela Kane of the UN

    Dressed simply but elegantly in a green jacket, black skirt and shiny brooch, Angela Kane walks briskly up to the lectern in Laby 118.

    by

  • Adolescent

    strains under the feathers of
    angels. and we smile and caress…

    by

  • 136 km/h

    they walk with bloodshot eyes,
    little dolls. new york smoke tastes like their paper wings,
    icarus-thin feathers, bones made of melting wax

    by

  • onthejob

    On the Job

    Ava has two children, a tertiary education, and her own business.She’s also a sex worker.

    by

  • pornhub

    Porn Hub

    If porn’s so popular, maybe it’s society that’s fucked.

    by

  • lidp

    Light in Dark Places

    [TRIGGER WARNING: Sexual Assault]
    When I was 15 years old, my father got very, very drunk and propositioned me for sex.

    by

  • thatswing

    It don’t mean a thing unless it’s got that swing

    “Last night, my boyfriend fucked another girl,” Isobel told me over a beer.

    by

  • Great Sexpectations

    “For the first time in human history, the images’ power and allure have supplanted that of real naked women. Today, real naked women are just bad porn.”

    by

  • Follow Me but Don’t Follow Me but Please Follow Me

    All you need is a solid profile pic, a large friend circle and the ability to filter out anything said that would detract from the promising other’s attractive features.

    by

  • Interview with the Chancellor

    Salient sat down for a chat about uni council reforms with the university’s big cheese, Chancellor Ian McKinnon.

    by

  • Write Drunk, Edit Sober

    What is it about drugs that spurs a creative mind?

    by

  • Another Special Visitor to Wellington: Angela Kane of the UN

    Dressed simply but elegantly in a green jacket, black skirt and shiny brooch, Angela Kane walks briskly up to the lectern in Laby 118.

    by

  • Adolescent

    strains under the feathers of
    angels. and we smile and caress…

    by

  • 136 km/h

    they walk with bloodshot eyes,
    little dolls. new york smoke tastes like their paper wings,
    icarus-thin feathers, bones made of melting wax

    by

  • Like a Virgin

    Let me dispel the assumption that I made a historical decision not to sleep with anyone: I’ve made a series of chronological decisions not to sleep with certain people.

    by

  • A Cherry Disposition

    I didn’t necessarily intend on ever getting to this position; that is, being a 22-year-old virgin in my fifth year of study.

    by

  • 1 flickin

    Flickin’ the Bean

    Society’s taboo around female masturbation is unhealthy and outdated.

    by

  • _interview prostitiute

    Pulling an All-Nighter

    By day, she is a first-year Politics student; by night, she is a sex worker, to pay off her “stupid debt”.

    by

  • guide to sex

    Salient’s Guide to Queer Sex

    Wherever you sit on the queer spectrum, we’ve got you sorted!

    by

  • Let’s Talk About Sex, Baby.

    (But only if it’s to make mo-ney.)

    by

  • one night

    How to Have a One-Night Stand

    The one-night stand is not for everyone, and should in no way be viewed as a mark of one’s sexual prowess. That being said, the experience of a one-night stand can be empowering, fulfilling, and just a sweet way to bone someone you don’t like enough to go out with.

    by

  • Feminism-Feature Header Image

    Feminism I Love You (But You’re Bringing Me Down)

    I have become disillusioned with feminism as it is conventionally expressed. My faith is waning, constantly put to the test by self-aggrandising sentiments and parochial critique.

    by

  • Marc Fallis’ Good Fullacio – a Kiwi Bloke’s Guide to Oral Sex

    Mate, I have lived a life of quiet desperation. Sure, I’ve had some financial success (well, more than my mate Matthew—poor bastard thought people would pay to clean their own cars). I made some fucking juice money, even brought out a line of smoothies. But none of this smoothies out the hole in my heart. […]

    by

  • Opinion

  • Being Well


    C B T

  • Being Well


    C B T

  • Arts and Science

  • Interview – Kerosene Comic Book’s Skymning

    Kerosene Comic Book is a collective of bedroom producers from around New Zealand, including Race Banyon, Career Girls, Totems, Skymning, Yvnalesca and Muirs. They’ve torn up the New Zealand electronic scene recently, dominating this years Camp A Low Hum and Chronophonium. I asked Skymning (real name Little Wayne) a few questions ahead of their 420 Eve show at Puppies this Saturday, and the release of their second 420 mixtape. Turn up.

    How did the KCB start out?
    I think the whole thing started out while Reuben (Totems) and Kieran (Kieran Tahir) were in High School as a kind of joke record label/a name to associate friends’ releases. We ended up all digging each others’ tunes and bouncing ideas off each other, but I think the first time we’d all been in one place together was last 420.

    Is there a particular style or characteristic that *is* KCB?
    Not necessarily any consistent style within the music (aside from the obvious bass-oriented electronic aspects), but I think the fact that we’re all in the same age bracket in the same country using the same music outlets and whatnot kind of keeps us together.

    Other than the 420 tape, what else is in the release pipeline?
    We’d designed and aimed to have some long-sleeves for sale at the 420 show, but I think we had a problem ordering the black shirts so there might only be enough for the fam. I think there are plans to put out a remix tape pretty soon. Race Banyon is in the process of getting wdamo 12″s made, I think, there’s a release party planned at Pups. Other than that I guess just everyone continuing with their individual music projects.

    by

  • Spotlight – The JOHOs

    Spotlight – The JOHOs

    Anybody passing through Newtown two weekends back may have noticed the punk cluster spilling out of Black Coffee onto Adelaide Rd. New Zealand punk archivists Up The Punks recently released their first zine, coupled with an exhibition documenting their recent stay in Beijing, and to celebrate their return Newtown was treated to the best punk gig Wellington’s seen in a long while. Phone Sex Robots, the JOHOs, Johnny and the Felchers, the Dilfs – each band fecking fantastic, though none more enjoyable than the JOHOs. Lord, strike me blind! Every opportunity to see them should be taken before drummer Jessie McNamara crosses the ditch. “Propaganda slinging pests” Sam Thurston (Rogernomix, Meth Drinker) and Axel (Awkward Death) share vocal duties and play a lightning-fast set of equally abrasive and surprisingly catchy songs at the expense of hapless Jehovah’s Witnesses (‘Johos’). The tongue-in-cheek is genuinely funny too, helped to no end by the Watchtower-styled zine that accompanied their Zero Style release late last year ( zerofuckingstyle.blogspot.com). The 11 tracks featured on Knock, Knock! It’s… the Johos offer a great representation of the band, and although it’s now sold out, the digital files are still available through Bandcamp. They’re playing on the 24th at Valhalla with “cheap piss from 6-8 and a late night greasy fry up” alongside Rogernomix, Awkward Death, Wizzkids and Gutrot – be there.

    by

  • The Cat’s Meow (Review)

    The Cat’s Meow
    By Steven Peros
    Directed by Matt Bently

    Potentially described as Hollywood fan fiction, playwright Steven Peros speculates on the events leading to the mysterious death by drawing from the yield of the Hollywood rumour mill. Lust. Greed. Camera. Action. 

    Cut to 1924, Hollywood. A party of movers, shakers and up-and-comers board a boat for a weekend cruise on which “One of them will leave horizontally,” hints narrator Elinor Glyn (Julia Harris) in a precise and charming expositional monologue. The text itself can stand on its own, being lofty enough to be evocative of the era while feeling genuine enough to let you feel like a friend to celebrity characters.

    I was surprised to find that the story was based on true events. All the characters are based on real people, including stars Marion Davies (Jessica Aaltonen) and Charlie Chaplin (Daniel Gorton) as well as the aforementioned Glyn. My ignorance was bliss as I was treated to two mysteries, not knowing who the killer or the victim were. You can spoil only one of these with a Wikipedia search.

    The performances are dynamic, considering that the characters are iconic in nature. Daniel Gorton’s Charlie Chaplin plays the master clown as an emotionally torn artist struggling with the consequences of his lifestyle. (Turns out Charlie Chaplin knocked up his lead actress. Who was 16. True story.)

    William Randolph Hearst, the media mogul who owns the boat, is played with conviction and integrity by Stagecraft veteran David Cox. He commands the stage with bold vocal tone. Though Captain of the ship, Cox’s performance breaks through the established archetype at certain moments, creating depth.

    Jessica Aaltonen is a delight to watch perform as the sassy Marion Davies. Her physicality is graceful and enthusiastic. She energetically smiles over subtext, showing the rope which weighs her anchor. She listens and reacts to her scene partners while still being enough of a force to give her scenes momentum.

    The supporting starlet duo of Celia Moore (Eileen Chase) and Didi Dawson (Emily Gorton) deserve a special mention for playful portrayals, ironically creating comic relief for Charlie Chaplin’s tragic subplot. Their background gossip creates the high-stakes mood and tone of the Hollywood scene.

    A live band accompanies the performance, with sultry vocals by Ruth Corkill. The soundtrack is of the era, with lyrics that reflect the action. It would have been better had her vocals been louder, as they were often drowned out by the band. While musically she fit into the story, I was unsure as to where her character and the band existed in the world of the play.

    The boat is evoked with two cabins stage right and left with portholes and bed, while the centre space serves as a dining hall. A steering wheel signifies the bridge upstage. The colour palette is muted. Greyscale with tones of lavender. The transitions were not overly disruptive, as they were covered by the sound of the live band.

    Stage Manager Andrea Wiechern and her assistant Karl Arndt play servants to move the table in and out of scene. They had a great physical game in one transition in which one would always slightly correct the other’s placement. It would have been nice to see it carry over to the other transitions.

    The costume was iconic of the period: the men wear mostly black and white plain suits and bow ties, with the exception of Chaplin’s cummerbund a brooding shade of purple. The evening gowns are exquisite. A range of popping colours adorned with a high level of attention invested in the accessories. It’s a shame the consistency breaks during a silly hat party. The costume props are thrown together from noticeably 2 dollar store props, which breaks the lavishly ‘20s atmosphere.

    Sadly, it is unlikely that anyone in the readership of Salient will go to the show. It’s okay. You don’t need to apologise. I understand. I wouldn’t have gone if I didn’t have a reviewer comp. Stagecraft productions have tertiary-student tickets priced at $20 (with a valid student ID). BATS tickets are reliably $10–$15 concession. Even Circa has tickets for $25 for under-25s (and they pay their actors). Stagecraft is isolating the student population with exorbitant and unnecessary ticket prices.

    The Cat’s Meow is a solid production. An intriguing script performance by actors who break the stereotype of amateur dramatics. The play runs for two-and-a-half hours in total, yet doesn’t drag and concludes with satisfaction with the plot as opposed to the relief of the final bow. It is evocative, sexy, and a little bit dangerous. Great for a date if you’re dating someone rich and famous.

     

    by

  • Pyramid Club: an interview with Dan Beban

    At any given moment, Wellington’s cultural landscape is a site of unrest. Bars close and become other bars, galleries run out of money, or the Council declares buildings unsafe. As was the case with Fred’s, a venue dedicated to experimental music and sound art which was housed in a disused church on Frederick St between 2009 and 2012. The group operated out-of-site for about a year, organising events in spaces around Wellington. Earlier this year, they settled into a permanent location on Taranaki St, called The Pyramid Club. I recently sat down with Dan Beban, the site’s organiser, to talk about his vision for the space, how it fits within Wellington’s performance landscape, and the history of sound art in Wellington.

    Can you start by giving some background to The Pyramid Club? Who is involved and how did it originate?
    Fred’s and Pyramid Club are part of a longer tradition in Wellington of music and art spaces, sort of DIY places, such as the Spacething, which was on Adelaide Rd for a while, and then it moved to Happy, which changed to Puppies a little while ago. So there’s been this continuation of artist-run spaces.

    How do you see yourself fitting within a particular performance and sound art landscape in Wellington?
    Pyramid Club is relatively small: there might be 60 people and that’s pretty full. And the acoustics of the room, it’s kind of interesting; it’s almost like a basement, but it’s up on a first-floor level, it has quite a low ceiling, quite a sort of boxy room. There’s no stage, you play on the floor, it’s quite different in a lot of ways to somewhere like Puppies or the Mighty, which is just much bigger; it’s a commercial operation, you know, they’re in the business of selling booze. That’s not our purpose and that’s not our worry. It means we can be more open to people doing weirder shit, where no one turns up, or not many people turn up.

    It’s a good time right now in Wellington; there’s a need for places for people to play music, put on exhibitions, whatever it is, and it’s shifting this year. There’s been these things set up, like Puppies, which was Happy, which has been there for a long time – ten years or more now, and Mighty’s been round for seven years – so there’s going to be this shift, unless someone opens up another bar or something, into more DIY spaces, people’s houses and that kind of stuff.

    What kind of work are you interested in presenting?
    Pyramid Club is just getting going. We’ve only had four or five gigs. [Recently] we had Hermione Johnson – this really great Auckland musician, she was part of a series we’ve got going which is called Extraordinary Renditions – we’re bringing together sound artists and people from out of town to Wellington to perform at TPC, or stage an installation or something like that. Other people coming up: we’ve got a guy called Rory Daly, who’s a sound artist; he uses lots of little toys and electronics and junk percussion and things like that. That’s the kind of shit I hope to encourage more of.

    What kind of curatorial involvement do you take with the space?
    Basically there’s a small group of people as the core group of PC, and I’m kind of like the director of it. So we have to decide what goes on there, and it’s not like anything can, or anything would fit that space or the kind of ethos of the place, but it’s very open.

    The thing I tried to do in running Fred’s was to have this juxtaposition. When you’re curating it doesn’t really do any good to have too many similar things, so what you try and do is juxtapose groups and styles so you expose audiences to different things. So you’d turn up expecting some psychedelic folk band, and the support act is, you know, a solo improvised saxophone piece.

    What projects have you got lined up for the future?
    At the moment we’re just getting the momentum going and seeing how it works. In a way, it’s sort of like the space itself defines what goes on there; you can’t really dictate too much how it happens because you have to see how people act when people go there.

    So we’re just organising weekly gigs with a variety of different bands and artists and things; and other things we want to do is get monthly art exhibitions in the stairwell, I’ve put a call out to people who might be interested in that. And I’d like to run a weekly night school – a workshop thing – so you’re an artist, say, and you come along you present some sort of lecture or workshop or presentation or whatever it is you want to do.

    by

  • Incomplete Works (Reivew)

    INCOMPLETE WORKS by Dylan Horrocks
    5/5 stars

    The lucky reader will occasionally have a moment in a book where they put the story on hold and stare blankly at the pages, marvelling at how well-crafted the thing is, a string of reverent saliva creeping from the corner of their mouth. Or, the smart reader could bypass luck and read Incomplete Works published by Victoria University Press, a collection so full of stunned pauses that the reader becomes near catatonic.

    This beautiful collection of comics draws from Horrocks’ 30ish years of writing, starting with the unexpectedly dark ‘Little Death’, which tells the story of a chance meeting in a bar, set to the Verlaines. The collection then moves through scratchy zines, the angularly surreal, and ending somewhere in the not-too-distant future, with an illustrated diary entry in part documenting the writing of an upcoming graphic novel. Incomplete Works is not only a great introduction to Horrocks’s writing – past, present, and future – but, thanks to the inclusion of a couple of pieces on the history of the form here, to New Zealand comics as a whole.

    While the subject matter is diverse, the drawing style is even more varied. His early work jumps erratically yet effortlessly – in one panel there may be a studied sketchiness, the next a meticulous woodwork-like rendering, while others take on an skeletal expressionism or occasionally appear to have been drawn by a somewhat debauched Quentin Blake.

    Even in the face of all this variety, there is always something weirdly New Zealandy about it. And true to that weirdly New Zealand cultural cringe, I wouldn’t normally mean that in a nice way. Horrocks manages to make it work, though, whether in the music drifting through the background of some strips, or the netball dress sported by the Spirit of Joy as she rises above rooftops in a panel which is, frankly, nothing short of glorious.

     

    by

  • The Inequality Debate (Review)

    THE INEQUALITY DEBATE by Max Rashbrooke
    4/5 stars

    Max Rashbrooke’s slender yet wonderfully researched book lays bare the global problem of income inequality, confirming that New Zealand is one of the OECD’s worst offenders. It makes for pretty grim reading. Of the 2.9 million working adults in New Zealand, just 29,000 control 16 per cent of the country’s combined wealth. Those 29,000 people have a greater share of the country’s wealth than 1.45 million New Zealanders. Let that sink in.

    Throughout the book, Rashbrooke breaks down what income inequality actually is and how both the world and New Zealand has descended into such an unequal quagmire. He answers many common questions surrounding income inequality, such as “Why do low incomes matter?” and “What about social mobility?”. In one of the standout sections of the book, ‘Rightful Reward’, he debunks the most common myth surrounding inequality that – if people in the lower income bracket worked harder, they would receive a greater slice of the pie. In short, current pay systems do not reflect people’s social contributions.

    But what I felt was missing from this book was suggestions of any possible solutions to the problem. Only in the very last paragraph of the book does Rashbrooke tell us that “we have some control over our inequality, too, through public pressure we place on governments and the way we deal with people around us.” What kind of pressure can we place on governments that can combat such outrageous figures?

    The Inequality Debate is both fascinating and horrifying. So short that you’ve got no excuse, this is the best book you can read if you want to be informed on an issue that will dominate the rhetoric of all major political parties this election year.

    Bridget Williams Books has just released a series of “snappy paperbacks”, print versions of their digital BWB Texts which “provide a new meeting space, connecting our histories, technologies, shifting readers, emerging and established authors, and our shared futures.”

    by

  • Review: Sexy Styling

    This review is by no means attempting to encourage or discourage certain activities or a particular image of the human body. You are all beautiful. Nevertheless, here are some hints for those wanting to shake up their style in the sack.

    Nipple Tassles
    Once these bedazzled little ornaments are affixed to one’s nipple, there isn’t really much to worry about. In fact, I quite like the idea of my 10E nips turning into two tiny tasseled disco balls under the appropriate mood lighting. But removing the tassels could potentially be problematic, especially if you’re sensitive in that area. Also, despite the myriad of YouTube videos offering advice on how best to twirl said tassels, it would be a major mood killer if you attempted, then failed to execute, a proper twirl.

    Price: Average cost is $31.99 from Peaches and Cream.
    4/5 stars

    Outfits
    Whether your style is flirty French maid, naughty nurse, or sultry Snow White, the internet has an outfit to suit every imagination. They can also be reused as excellent Halloween costumes.

    But wearing one of these outfits in the bedroom takes a lot of confidence in yourself to ‘play the part’, and as soon as you or your partner break the role-playing game, the moment will inevitably have passed. The crucial question to ask yourself is: are you prepared to pay for an outfit that might not get much use? Good-quality lingerie costs about the same and can be worn in far more circumstances.

    Price: Average cost is $79.99 from Bras N Things.
    2.5/5 stars

    Waxing
    Brazilian Wax (women): The pain factor is usually what puts people off getting a Brazilian. But if you pop a couple of ibuprofen 30 minutes beforehand, the pain will usually only be momentary. You should also consider your skin type; if you have extremely sensitive skin, this treatment is probably not for you. But ladies, trust me when I say that the pain is worth it. The result is soooo smoooooth, and it makes you feel incredibly confident. It will also look good for about three weeks, so consider it an investment.

    Chest and Back (men): Wax boutiques in Wellington don’t currently offer Brazilians for men. That said, manscaping with wax has long been popular among males. While your partner might genuinely enjoy the Chewbacca look, they will appreciate the effort of having gotten a good wax.

    Price: $30–50 at Strip Wax Boutique (best place in town, hands down).
    5/5 stars

    by

  • I Can’t Get No Satisfaction

    When a sex scene pops up during a movie session with your parents it is always horrendously awkward, unless you have an Oedipus complex going on. I blush every time the main actors even kiss. Generally, this is a heated response to nothing much. Instead of providing us with a blow-by-blow account, directors use shots of discarded clothes, twisted facial expressions, grasping hands and arched backs to simply give a taster, presumably to avoid the tacky label of ‘porn’. Too often, it is awkward and unsatisfying, with or without the presence of parents.

    In light of recent controversy sparked by films such as Nymphomaniac (Lars von Trier, 2014), filmmakers appear to be getting braver (although maybe it’s just von Trier). With the second version already banned in Romania, and more bare flesh and crass honesty about sex than normal (Charlotte Gainsbourg describes discovering her “cunt” at the age of two), it is still not the gratifying exploration of sex it is assumed society is not ready for. Take Love and Other Drugs, for a more mainstream example. After all the hype of explicit sexual behaviour, all you are rewarded with is the surprise of darling Anne Hathaway getting her tits out. We deserve at least a notably positive, celebratory mainstream representation of sex, screaming the fact that it can be fucking fantastic.

    There is, however, a need for a balance. Whenever A Serbian Film (Srđan Spasojević, 2010) manages to emerge in conversation, there is always a general murmur of “Don’t judge me for even knowing about it”. Only one person I know of has actually seen any of it, as a dare within a hilarious (obviously) group of guys to see who could last the longest. He describes the half-hour he saw before leaving the room as horrific, and now knows why necrophilia is censored. But bad sex is easy to film because it’s easy to shock society with. Here lies a prime opportunity for some filmmaker to be like: “Hey, this is real, genuine loving sex in detail”, so we don’t have to try to fill the gaps with our imaginations or have the insecurity of wondering if we’re doing it right in real life e.g. should the bra stay on or off.

    So we have a choice. Option 1: grotesque sex scenes that make us believe in morality, or Option 2: exposed breasts and penises that fail to satisfy. Surely, we want to leave a movie turned on, not turned off, with some satisfaction that sex is a wonderful thing.

    5 Arguably Most Controversial Sex Scenes of all time:

    1. Watch any Lars von Trier movie (especially Nymphomaniac).

    2. The Brown Bunny. Unsimulated sex scene. The film was described by Roger Ebert as “the worst film in the history of Cannes”.

    3.  The Last Temptation of Christ. Martin Scorsese presents flash-forwards being experienced by Jesus in his final moments, including having sex with Mary Magdalene. Christians got their knickers in a twist.

    4. Lolita. Probably contains the highest number of implied sex scenes ever.

    5. Brokeback Mountain. The Academy Award–winning movie featured a homosexual lovemaking scene between Jake Gyllenhaal and Heath Ledger, and was subsequently pulled from theatres all over America.

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  • Interview – Kerosene Comic Book’s Skymning

    Kerosene Comic Book is a collective of bedroom producers from around New Zealand, including Race Banyon, Career Girls, Totems, Skymning, Yvnalesca and Muirs. They’ve torn up the New Zealand electronic scene recently, dominating this years Camp A Low Hum and Chronophonium. I asked Skymning (real name Little Wayne) a few questions ahead of their 420 Eve show at Puppies this Saturday, and the release of their second 420 mixtape. Turn up.

    How did the KCB start out?
    I think the whole thing started out while Reuben (Totems) and Kieran (Kieran Tahir) were in High School as a kind of joke record label/a name to associate friends’ releases. We ended up all digging each others’ tunes and bouncing ideas off each other, but I think the first time we’d all been in one place together was last 420.

    Is there a particular style or characteristic that *is* KCB?
    Not necessarily any consistent style within the music (aside from the obvious bass-oriented electronic aspects), but I think the fact that we’re all in the same age bracket in the same country using the same music outlets and whatnot kind of keeps us together.

    Other than the 420 tape, what else is in the release pipeline?
    We’d designed and aimed to have some long-sleeves for sale at the 420 show, but I think we had a problem ordering the black shirts so there might only be enough for the fam. I think there are plans to put out a remix tape pretty soon. Race Banyon is in the process of getting wdamo 12″s made, I think, there’s a release party planned at Pups. Other than that I guess just everyone continuing with their individual music projects.

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  • Spotlight – The JOHOs

    Spotlight – The JOHOs

    Anybody passing through Newtown two weekends back may have noticed the punk cluster spilling out of Black Coffee onto Adelaide Rd. New Zealand punk archivists Up The Punks recently released their first zine, coupled with an exhibition documenting their recent stay in Beijing, and to celebrate their return Newtown was treated to the best punk gig Wellington’s seen in a long while. Phone Sex Robots, the JOHOs, Johnny and the Felchers, the Dilfs – each band fecking fantastic, though none more enjoyable than the JOHOs. Lord, strike me blind! Every opportunity to see them should be taken before drummer Jessie McNamara crosses the ditch. “Propaganda slinging pests” Sam Thurston (Rogernomix, Meth Drinker) and Axel (Awkward Death) share vocal duties and play a lightning-fast set of equally abrasive and surprisingly catchy songs at the expense of hapless Jehovah’s Witnesses (‘Johos’). The tongue-in-cheek is genuinely funny too, helped to no end by the Watchtower-styled zine that accompanied their Zero Style release late last year ( zerofuckingstyle.blogspot.com). The 11 tracks featured on Knock, Knock! It’s… the Johos offer a great representation of the band, and although it’s now sold out, the digital files are still available through Bandcamp. They’re playing on the 24th at Valhalla with “cheap piss from 6-8 and a late night greasy fry up” alongside Rogernomix, Awkward Death, Wizzkids and Gutrot – be there.

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  • The Cat’s Meow (Review)

    The Cat’s Meow
    By Steven Peros
    Directed by Matt Bently

    Potentially described as Hollywood fan fiction, playwright Steven Peros speculates on the events leading to the mysterious death by drawing from the yield of the Hollywood rumour mill. Lust. Greed. Camera. Action. 

    Cut to 1924, Hollywood. A party of movers, shakers and up-and-comers board a boat for a weekend cruise on which “One of them will leave horizontally,” hints narrator Elinor Glyn (Julia Harris) in a precise and charming expositional monologue. The text itself can stand on its own, being lofty enough to be evocative of the era while feeling genuine enough to let you feel like a friend to celebrity characters.

    I was surprised to find that the story was based on true events. All the characters are based on real people, including stars Marion Davies (Jessica Aaltonen) and Charlie Chaplin (Daniel Gorton) as well as the aforementioned Glyn. My ignorance was bliss as I was treated to two mysteries, not knowing who the killer or the victim were. You can spoil only one of these with a Wikipedia search.

    The performances are dynamic, considering that the characters are iconic in nature. Daniel Gorton’s Charlie Chaplin plays the master clown as an emotionally torn artist struggling with the consequences of his lifestyle. (Turns out Charlie Chaplin knocked up his lead actress. Who was 16. True story.)

    William Randolph Hearst, the media mogul who owns the boat, is played with conviction and integrity by Stagecraft veteran David Cox. He commands the stage with bold vocal tone. Though Captain of the ship, Cox’s performance breaks through the established archetype at certain moments, creating depth.

    Jessica Aaltonen is a delight to watch perform as the sassy Marion Davies. Her physicality is graceful and enthusiastic. She energetically smiles over subtext, showing the rope which weighs her anchor. She listens and reacts to her scene partners while still being enough of a force to give her scenes momentum.

    The supporting starlet duo of Celia Moore (Eileen Chase) and Didi Dawson (Emily Gorton) deserve a special mention for playful portrayals, ironically creating comic relief for Charlie Chaplin’s tragic subplot. Their background gossip creates the high-stakes mood and tone of the Hollywood scene.

    A live band accompanies the performance, with sultry vocals by Ruth Corkill. The soundtrack is of the era, with lyrics that reflect the action. It would have been better had her vocals been louder, as they were often drowned out by the band. While musically she fit into the story, I was unsure as to where her character and the band existed in the world of the play.

    The boat is evoked with two cabins stage right and left with portholes and bed, while the centre space serves as a dining hall. A steering wheel signifies the bridge upstage. The colour palette is muted. Greyscale with tones of lavender. The transitions were not overly disruptive, as they were covered by the sound of the live band.

    Stage Manager Andrea Wiechern and her assistant Karl Arndt play servants to move the table in and out of scene. They had a great physical game in one transition in which one would always slightly correct the other’s placement. It would have been nice to see it carry over to the other transitions.

    The costume was iconic of the period: the men wear mostly black and white plain suits and bow ties, with the exception of Chaplin’s cummerbund a brooding shade of purple. The evening gowns are exquisite. A range of popping colours adorned with a high level of attention invested in the accessories. It’s a shame the consistency breaks during a silly hat party. The costume props are thrown together from noticeably 2 dollar store props, which breaks the lavishly ‘20s atmosphere.

    Sadly, it is unlikely that anyone in the readership of Salient will go to the show. It’s okay. You don’t need to apologise. I understand. I wouldn’t have gone if I didn’t have a reviewer comp. Stagecraft productions have tertiary-student tickets priced at $20 (with a valid student ID). BATS tickets are reliably $10–$15 concession. Even Circa has tickets for $25 for under-25s (and they pay their actors). Stagecraft is isolating the student population with exorbitant and unnecessary ticket prices.

    The Cat’s Meow is a solid production. An intriguing script performance by actors who break the stereotype of amateur dramatics. The play runs for two-and-a-half hours in total, yet doesn’t drag and concludes with satisfaction with the plot as opposed to the relief of the final bow. It is evocative, sexy, and a little bit dangerous. Great for a date if you’re dating someone rich and famous.

     

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  • Pyramid Club: an interview with Dan Beban

    At any given moment, Wellington’s cultural landscape is a site of unrest. Bars close and become other bars, galleries run out of money, or the Council declares buildings unsafe. As was the case with Fred’s, a venue dedicated to experimental music and sound art which was housed in a disused church on Frederick St between 2009 and 2012. The group operated out-of-site for about a year, organising events in spaces around Wellington. Earlier this year, they settled into a permanent location on Taranaki St, called The Pyramid Club. I recently sat down with Dan Beban, the site’s organiser, to talk about his vision for the space, how it fits within Wellington’s performance landscape, and the history of sound art in Wellington.

    Can you start by giving some background to The Pyramid Club? Who is involved and how did it originate?
    Fred’s and Pyramid Club are part of a longer tradition in Wellington of music and art spaces, sort of DIY places, such as the Spacething, which was on Adelaide Rd for a while, and then it moved to Happy, which changed to Puppies a little while ago. So there’s been this continuation of artist-run spaces.

    How do you see yourself fitting within a particular performance and sound art landscape in Wellington?
    Pyramid Club is relatively small: there might be 60 people and that’s pretty full. And the acoustics of the room, it’s kind of interesting; it’s almost like a basement, but it’s up on a first-floor level, it has quite a low ceiling, quite a sort of boxy room. There’s no stage, you play on the floor, it’s quite different in a lot of ways to somewhere like Puppies or the Mighty, which is just much bigger; it’s a commercial operation, you know, they’re in the business of selling booze. That’s not our purpose and that’s not our worry. It means we can be more open to people doing weirder shit, where no one turns up, or not many people turn up.

    It’s a good time right now in Wellington; there’s a need for places for people to play music, put on exhibitions, whatever it is, and it’s shifting this year. There’s been these things set up, like Puppies, which was Happy, which has been there for a long time – ten years or more now, and Mighty’s been round for seven years – so there’s going to be this shift, unless someone opens up another bar or something, into more DIY spaces, people’s houses and that kind of stuff.

    What kind of work are you interested in presenting?
    Pyramid Club is just getting going. We’ve only had four or five gigs. [Recently] we had Hermione Johnson – this really great Auckland musician, she was part of a series we’ve got going which is called Extraordinary Renditions – we’re bringing together sound artists and people from out of town to Wellington to perform at TPC, or stage an installation or something like that. Other people coming up: we’ve got a guy called Rory Daly, who’s a sound artist; he uses lots of little toys and electronics and junk percussion and things like that. That’s the kind of shit I hope to encourage more of.

    What kind of curatorial involvement do you take with the space?
    Basically there’s a small group of people as the core group of PC, and I’m kind of like the director of it. So we have to decide what goes on there, and it’s not like anything can, or anything would fit that space or the kind of ethos of the place, but it’s very open.

    The thing I tried to do in running Fred’s was to have this juxtaposition. When you’re curating it doesn’t really do any good to have too many similar things, so what you try and do is juxtapose groups and styles so you expose audiences to different things. So you’d turn up expecting some psychedelic folk band, and the support act is, you know, a solo improvised saxophone piece.

    What projects have you got lined up for the future?
    At the moment we’re just getting the momentum going and seeing how it works. In a way, it’s sort of like the space itself defines what goes on there; you can’t really dictate too much how it happens because you have to see how people act when people go there.

    So we’re just organising weekly gigs with a variety of different bands and artists and things; and other things we want to do is get monthly art exhibitions in the stairwell, I’ve put a call out to people who might be interested in that. And I’d like to run a weekly night school – a workshop thing – so you’re an artist, say, and you come along you present some sort of lecture or workshop or presentation or whatever it is you want to do.

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  • Incomplete Works (Reivew)

    INCOMPLETE WORKS by Dylan Horrocks
    5/5 stars

    The lucky reader will occasionally have a moment in a book where they put the story on hold and stare blankly at the pages, marvelling at how well-crafted the thing is, a string of reverent saliva creeping from the corner of their mouth. Or, the smart reader could bypass luck and read Incomplete Works published by Victoria University Press, a collection so full of stunned pauses that the reader becomes near catatonic.

    This beautiful collection of comics draws from Horrocks’ 30ish years of writing, starting with the unexpectedly dark ‘Little Death’, which tells the story of a chance meeting in a bar, set to the Verlaines. The collection then moves through scratchy zines, the angularly surreal, and ending somewhere in the not-too-distant future, with an illustrated diary entry in part documenting the writing of an upcoming graphic novel. Incomplete Works is not only a great introduction to Horrocks’s writing – past, present, and future – but, thanks to the inclusion of a couple of pieces on the history of the form here, to New Zealand comics as a whole.

    While the subject matter is diverse, the drawing style is even more varied. His early work jumps erratically yet effortlessly – in one panel there may be a studied sketchiness, the next a meticulous woodwork-like rendering, while others take on an skeletal expressionism or occasionally appear to have been drawn by a somewhat debauched Quentin Blake.

    Even in the face of all this variety, there is always something weirdly New Zealandy about it. And true to that weirdly New Zealand cultural cringe, I wouldn’t normally mean that in a nice way. Horrocks manages to make it work, though, whether in the music drifting through the background of some strips, or the netball dress sported by the Spirit of Joy as she rises above rooftops in a panel which is, frankly, nothing short of glorious.

     

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  • The Inequality Debate (Review)

    THE INEQUALITY DEBATE by Max Rashbrooke
    4/5 stars

    Max Rashbrooke’s slender yet wonderfully researched book lays bare the global problem of income inequality, confirming that New Zealand is one of the OECD’s worst offenders. It makes for pretty grim reading. Of the 2.9 million working adults in New Zealand, just 29,000 control 16 per cent of the country’s combined wealth. Those 29,000 people have a greater share of the country’s wealth than 1.45 million New Zealanders. Let that sink in.

    Throughout the book, Rashbrooke breaks down what income inequality actually is and how both the world and New Zealand has descended into such an unequal quagmire. He answers many common questions surrounding income inequality, such as “Why do low incomes matter?” and “What about social mobility?”. In one of the standout sections of the book, ‘Rightful Reward’, he debunks the most common myth surrounding inequality that – if people in the lower income bracket worked harder, they would receive a greater slice of the pie. In short, current pay systems do not reflect people’s social contributions.

    But what I felt was missing from this book was suggestions of any possible solutions to the problem. Only in the very last paragraph of the book does Rashbrooke tell us that “we have some control over our inequality, too, through public pressure we place on governments and the way we deal with people around us.” What kind of pressure can we place on governments that can combat such outrageous figures?

    The Inequality Debate is both fascinating and horrifying. So short that you’ve got no excuse, this is the best book you can read if you want to be informed on an issue that will dominate the rhetoric of all major political parties this election year.

    Bridget Williams Books has just released a series of “snappy paperbacks”, print versions of their digital BWB Texts which “provide a new meeting space, connecting our histories, technologies, shifting readers, emerging and established authors, and our shared futures.”

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  • Review: Sexy Styling

    This review is by no means attempting to encourage or discourage certain activities or a particular image of the human body. You are all beautiful. Nevertheless, here are some hints for those wanting to shake up their style in the sack.

    Nipple Tassles
    Once these bedazzled little ornaments are affixed to one’s nipple, there isn’t really much to worry about. In fact, I quite like the idea of my 10E nips turning into two tiny tasseled disco balls under the appropriate mood lighting. But removing the tassels could potentially be problematic, especially if you’re sensitive in that area. Also, despite the myriad of YouTube videos offering advice on how best to twirl said tassels, it would be a major mood killer if you attempted, then failed to execute, a proper twirl.

    Price: Average cost is $31.99 from Peaches and Cream.
    4/5 stars

    Outfits
    Whether your style is flirty French maid, naughty nurse, or sultry Snow White, the internet has an outfit to suit every imagination. They can also be reused as excellent Halloween costumes.

    But wearing one of these outfits in the bedroom takes a lot of confidence in yourself to ‘play the part’, and as soon as you or your partner break the role-playing game, the moment will inevitably have passed. The crucial question to ask yourself is: are you prepared to pay for an outfit that might not get much use? Good-quality lingerie costs about the same and can be worn in far more circumstances.

    Price: Average cost is $79.99 from Bras N Things.
    2.5/5 stars

    Waxing
    Brazilian Wax (women): The pain factor is usually what puts people off getting a Brazilian. But if you pop a couple of ibuprofen 30 minutes beforehand, the pain will usually only be momentary. You should also consider your skin type; if you have extremely sensitive skin, this treatment is probably not for you. But ladies, trust me when I say that the pain is worth it. The result is soooo smoooooth, and it makes you feel incredibly confident. It will also look good for about three weeks, so consider it an investment.

    Chest and Back (men): Wax boutiques in Wellington don’t currently offer Brazilians for men. That said, manscaping with wax has long been popular among males. While your partner might genuinely enjoy the Chewbacca look, they will appreciate the effort of having gotten a good wax.

    Price: $30–50 at Strip Wax Boutique (best place in town, hands down).
    5/5 stars

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  • I Can’t Get No Satisfaction

    When a sex scene pops up during a movie session with your parents it is always horrendously awkward, unless you have an Oedipus complex going on. I blush every time the main actors even kiss. Generally, this is a heated response to nothing much. Instead of providing us with a blow-by-blow account, directors use shots of discarded clothes, twisted facial expressions, grasping hands and arched backs to simply give a taster, presumably to avoid the tacky label of ‘porn’. Too often, it is awkward and unsatisfying, with or without the presence of parents.

    In light of recent controversy sparked by films such as Nymphomaniac (Lars von Trier, 2014), filmmakers appear to be getting braver (although maybe it’s just von Trier). With the second version already banned in Romania, and more bare flesh and crass honesty about sex than normal (Charlotte Gainsbourg describes discovering her “cunt” at the age of two), it is still not the gratifying exploration of sex it is assumed society is not ready for. Take Love and Other Drugs, for a more mainstream example. After all the hype of explicit sexual behaviour, all you are rewarded with is the surprise of darling Anne Hathaway getting her tits out. We deserve at least a notably positive, celebratory mainstream representation of sex, screaming the fact that it can be fucking fantastic.

    There is, however, a need for a balance. Whenever A Serbian Film (Srđan Spasojević, 2010) manages to emerge in conversation, there is always a general murmur of “Don’t judge me for even knowing about it”. Only one person I know of has actually seen any of it, as a dare within a hilarious (obviously) group of guys to see who could last the longest. He describes the half-hour he saw before leaving the room as horrific, and now knows why necrophilia is censored. But bad sex is easy to film because it’s easy to shock society with. Here lies a prime opportunity for some filmmaker to be like: “Hey, this is real, genuine loving sex in detail”, so we don’t have to try to fill the gaps with our imaginations or have the insecurity of wondering if we’re doing it right in real life e.g. should the bra stay on or off.

    So we have a choice. Option 1: grotesque sex scenes that make us believe in morality, or Option 2: exposed breasts and penises that fail to satisfy. Surely, we want to leave a movie turned on, not turned off, with some satisfaction that sex is a wonderful thing.

    5 Arguably Most Controversial Sex Scenes of all time:

    1. Watch any Lars von Trier movie (especially Nymphomaniac).

    2. The Brown Bunny. Unsimulated sex scene. The film was described by Roger Ebert as “the worst film in the history of Cannes”.

    3.  The Last Temptation of Christ. Martin Scorsese presents flash-forwards being experienced by Jesus in his final moments, including having sex with Mary Magdalene. Christians got their knickers in a twist.

    4. Lolita. Probably contains the highest number of implied sex scenes ever.

    5. Brokeback Mountain. The Academy Award–winning movie featured a homosexual lovemaking scene between Jake Gyllenhaal and Heath Ledger, and was subsequently pulled from theatres all over America.

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  • About the Author ()

    Salient is a magazine. Salient is a website. Salient is an institution founded in 1938 to cater to the whim and fancy of students of Victoria University. We are partly funded by VUWSA and partly by gold bullion that was discovered under a pile of old Salients from the 40's. Salient welcomes your participation in debate on all the issues that we present to you, and if you're a student of Victoria University then you're more than welcome to drop in and have tea and scones with the contributors of this little rag in our little hideaway that overlooks Wellington.

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    Editor's Pick

    This Ain’t a Scene it’s a Goddamned Arm Wrestle

    : Interior – Industrial Soviet Beerhall – Night It was late November and cold as hell when I stumbled into the Zhiguli Beer Hall. I was in Moscow, about to take the trans-Mongolian rail line to Beijing, and after finding someone in my hostel who could speak English, had decided