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May 26, 2014 | by  | in Arts Music |
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Ghost Stories by Coldplay [Review]

3.5 Stars

Coldplay is a classic on my ‘Chill’ playlist, but I was uneasy about this album following the pop catastrophe of Mylo Xyloto in 2011. I was pleasantly surprised.

With this album, Coldplay tried to make their music for the mass market, while also returning to their original style. You can hear the pop influences in the background of most of the songs, as electro ambience and beats swell through the choruses. The album is pretty depressing, which isn’t surprising after Chris Martin’s breakup with his wife of 11 years, Gwyneth Paltrow. Most of the songs reflect his heartbreak over the separation, and it is clear from the first song how Martin is handling this sudden and bewildering change in his life, with lines like: “I think of you / I haven’t slept / I think I do love / I won’t forget.” ‘Midnight’ has a haunting beauty to it, with processed vocals and an ambient synth background that makes you want to curl up under the covers.

As a big Coldplay fan, my heart goes out to the wreck of a man that Chris Martin seems to be right now. The whole album feels extremely intimate, but Martin keeps the lyrics vague on details, keeping it all easily relatable. Although the album is about devastating heartbreak, it ends with optimism in the form of ‘O’, showcasing Coldplay’s old acoustic style with Martin’s classic falsetto and the plea for unconditional love. This album feels like a turning point in Coldplay’s career and although it is not nearly as amazing as their early albums, I look forward to what the future brings for the band.

 

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