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July 13, 2014 | by  | in News |
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Bio Building at Embryonic Stage

Investigation work has begun on the construction of the new $100 million Biological Sciences building, while the University awaits final approval on the project.

Construction on the new School of Biological Sciences will begin at the end of the year, subject to final University Council approval.

The new building will be located next to Cotton, at the top of Kelburn Parade. The School will be constructed on and under the Gate 6 carpark, across the road and into what is currently the grass strip. There will be a plaza between the new building and Cotton.

The building will provide laboratory, teaching and research facilities, with four storeys and 12,000 square metres of space.

In March, Director of Campus Services Jenny Bentley said the upgrade was necessary as the current Kirk facilities were “inadequate and not fit for purpose.”

The Kirk Building has failed to meet the University’s seismic rating or health and safety standards, and is considered by the University to be “a deterrent to staff recruitment and student retention.”

If the project is approved and construction begins in late 2014, it is estimated to be completed in early 2018.

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:   I wanted to write this piece, in order to connect to all tauira within the University, with the hope that we can all remind ourselves that we are a part of an environment which is valuable, no matter our culture, our beliefs or our skin colour. The ultimate purpose of this