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July 20, 2014 | by  | in Being Well Opinion |
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C B T

This instalment of CBT was brought to you by the shitty individual’s epiphanies concerning their critical inner voice.

CBT tells us that critical inner voices are very real-feeling maladaptive thoughts.

CBT tells us that critical inner voices stem from assumptions we hold about ourselves in relation to the rest of the world.

CBT tells us that assumptions we hold about ourselves sometimes stem from beliefs which were reinforced during our early development, and these can be challenged.

I’m driving in the car with my mum and I am the passenger and she is the one doing the driving and it is the holidays. She is talking to me and I am probably being a little too harsh on her as regards the way she sounds when she eats and then she almost misses our turn. My thoughts are like uhhhhh as in they are not up to much. I’m telling my mum that she almost missed the turn and I’m telling her my thoughts about my teenage brother and how their relationship works and I am doing this without realising what a brat I am being but then she is like ah OMG you are a weirdo and you are mean-spirited and you are not well-intentioned and I cannot relate to you, and then my thoughts are like ahhhh damn. And I am then remembering how unsure I am feeling about myself as a not-mean, relatable person, and my thoughts are like you are mean, and my thoughts are also like wow we sound like your mother. So I’m thinking: I do not want to be a cliché and blame my maladaptive thought patterns about my self-worth on my mother/guardian/other-significant-relative but maybe I could entertain a little bit of this idea for a little while. I’m thinking that it might be useful to understand where parts of my critical inner voice come from, in order to disassemble those parts and make them feel less real. I am remembering that I should try to examine how these harmful sentences reinforce untrue assumptions I have about myself, and disassemble those assumptions. I’m thinking also that family love is weird and hard and if it is too hard less time should be had with family. I’m thinking (in kind of a sad way) that not all people can sing like the Spice Girls about their mama/other-significant-relative but some of us can love our family members in a way that remembers to be kind to ourselves first.

CBT tells us that assumptions we hold about ourselves sometimes stem from beliefs which were reinforced during our early development, and these can be challenged.

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a talk therapy used to treat disruptive thinking as well as diagnosed mental illnesses. Each CBT client will use it in their own way, and students who think it could help them can visit Student Health.

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