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July 13, 2014 | by  | in Arts Music |
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Interview: Abe Hollingsworth of Mermaidens

Wellington’s own Mermaidens are just finishing off their first nationwide tour, but drummer Abe Hollingsworth still has time for the little folk.

Is ‘tour life’ anything like you expected?
Tour life for me involved watching lots of Orange is the New Black, getting high in bed, drinking lots of tea and buying ridiculously cheap clothing – almost exactly what I thought.

Is there a decent network of promoters/venue owners up and down the country, or was it quite hard to organise?
All the people we have talked to and worked with have been amazing. There are some really passionate and helpful people who have helped us book support bands, get gear and given us tea.

All the venues we played in were super-cool too, and made me happy about the state of the NZ music scene.

What’s been your favourite moment of the tour?
Watching all these amazing bands I’ve never seen before and being so in love with them.

Favourite NZ release this year?
Eskimo Eyes – I Can’t Think or Man in Rug – Man in Rug. I can’t decide between these two! Both have been on repeat in my ears.

Favourite Mermaidens’ show ever?
Hands down: Noisey room at Camp a Low Hum. We played in the middle of a cabin surrounded by the audience. I have no idea how many people were there, but I could feel all this energy around me and it was amazing!

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