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July 20, 2014 | by  | in Ngāi Tauira Opinion |
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KI O RAHI

OBJECTIVE OF KI O RAHI

Have fun and outscore the opposition. Kioma score by touching pou(s) with the Ki (for potential points) then running the Ki through Te Roto and placing it down in Pawero to convert pou touches into points. Taniwha score by hitting the Tupu with the Ki; both teams attempt to stop the other team from scoring.

FIELD LAYOUT

Ki o Rahi is played on a circular field with concentric circles.

The size of the field varies depending on the amount of players, level of fitness and the type of rules being played.

Team zones:

Kioma can go into Te Marama, Te Ao and Pawero, use Te Ara only to get into and out of the Pawero to help attack or defend, and run through Te Roto to convert pou touches into points on the board.

Taniwha can go into Te Roto and Te Ao zones only.

EQUIPMENT NEEDED

  • 1 Tupu (central target): approx 40-gallon drum or rubbish bin
  • 7 pou
  • Ki: woven flax ball, normal ball, rocks, rolled-up jersey, or anything
  • Field marking

RULES

– Play is started from Te Marama, with Kioma throwing or kicking the Ki to a teammate in Pawero area.

– They attempt to pass the Ki to a teammate, who touches a pou (for a potential point) and then can either touch more pou to accumulate more potential points, or run it through Te Roto then place the Ki on or over the Pawero line to convert all pou touches into points on the board. (This is the only time they can enter Te Roto.)

 Kioma can not go through or over Te Ara to score.

– If a Kioma player is ‘tagged’ in Te Roto while trying to score, it is a turnover; if they run into Te Roto and run or pass the Ki back out without being touched, they retain possession but the pou touches are recounted.

– Kioma scores, and play restarts with a kick-off from Te Marama.

– Out of bounds: last team in possession hands possession over to the other team.

– Taniwha scores by hitting the Tupu with the Ki, and play carries on.

– Jump shots may be allowed if the Taniwha player jumps from Te Roto and releases the Ki before landing in Pawero: they must leave immediately and not affect play, or Kioma gain possession.

– Players in possession must be moving, or they have 3–5 seconds to pass, shoot or hand it over.

– Players cannot enter Te Ara, unless they are Kioma moving between Pawero and Te Ao.

– Players may get the Ki from other zones as long as part of their body stays in their legal zone. Taniwha may take jump shots at the Tupu as long as the ball is released before they touch the ground. (Some iwi play no entering other zones or penalties may occur: this is called the Turangawaewae rule.)

Come on whānau, give it a go!

Mauri Ora!

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