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July 20, 2014 | by  | in Food Online Only Opinion |
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Take 5 for Students: Spaghetti Carbonara

Spaghetti, bacon, eggs, cream, cheese.

This is a fast, inexpensive way to feed a bunch of people and leave them happy. Spaghetti is always fun to eat.

While you boil a packet of spaghetti in lots of salted, boiling water, chop up some bacon and sauté in a little olive oil.

In a bowl, whisk 3 eggs, ¼ cup cream, pepper and lots of grated tasty cheddar.

Drain the pasta and immediately tip into the bowl of eggy mix. It works best stirring everything together in the bowl rather than in the hot pot, as there will be no chance that the eggs will scramble and spoil the self -saucing effect of this clever dish. Then add the hot bacon. Stir and serve in warmed bowls.

This basic recipe can be varied in many ways. Use any pasta shape you like. Substitute cream for sour cream. Instead of bacon, use sliced frankfurters, ham, chorizo or other dried meats – or even use a can of tuna. Sometimes in the supermarket, blocks of feta (Danish or German) are bought in bulk, wrapped on site and sold quite affordably. Crumbled, feta makes an interesting change from cheddar or the more classic parmesan.

– Margôt de Cotesworth

Take 5 and Cook: cooking fabulous food with just 5 ingredients. Read our blog for more free recipes

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