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August 10, 2014 | by  | in Being Well Opinion |
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C B T

CBT tells us that paranoid thoughts are intrusive thoughts.

CBT tells us that intrusive thoughts about trust in relationships are difficult to rationalise.

CBT tells us that trust in a relationship can be very difficult to build but also can be very therapeutic, once established, in combating intrusive thoughts.

I’m lying on my bed and it is raining. The rain has got in through the windows and some of my unread books are wet and I’m laughing at myself because those books were never going to be read anyway. I’m txting my friend who hasn’t liked my latest Instagram and my thoughts are all it is probably because she is angry at you or bored with you and this is probably because three months ago you said a thing. My mind grips my head and then it is all you speak too quick and you need to be less intense at brunch times and you need to keep on sending good links from the internet to lay at her feet like the cat that you are because you need to make yourself worthwhile. My thoughts are like you need to be impressive and make yourself worthwhile because otherwise she will not love you. And I am kind-of-aware that this whole thing is a shallow illustration of the swallowing and destructive process of unwanted, ‘irrational’ paranoia in relation to a sort of mysterious insecurity w/r/t interpersonal relationships but the point is my thoughts are real. My thoughts then become my guts and my guts are real. I’m dealing with my guts by lying on my stomach and then the nice side of my mind is like you should try to un-rationalise the situation. I’m thinking that this is wishful thinking but my nice mind is like listen. Don’t engage with these intrusive thoughts because their content does not matter – don’t engage with these thoughts and beat them in a debate because their content does not matter – don’t engage with these thoughts because you do not need to draw up a rational, CBT-style, evidence-‘for’-and-‘against’ chart about the ways that people love you. My nice mind is like forget about using all the nice things your friend has said about you as ammunition against paranoid intrusions because these are irrelevant when your mind hates you, but: remember that you trust her, and her actions indicate that you are worthwhile. You can trust her. My mind is like: be less like Fiona Apple in ‘Valentine’ and more like Keri Hilson in ‘Pretty Girl Rock’. You can ring your friend and trust that she loves you and other content does not matter.

CBT tells us that trust in a relationship can be very difficult to build but can be very therapeutic once established in combating intrusive thoughts.

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a talk therapy used to treat disruptive thinking and mental illness. Each CBT client will use it in their own way, and students who think it could help them can visit Student Health.

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