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August 18, 2014 | by  | in Opinion VUWSA |
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Sonya Says

Fooood. As I write this, it is late in the afternoon and I am hungry. Lately, I’ve been trying to resist indulging in buying yummy unhealthy food on campus, because I’ve realised that sugar in the morning means I crash in the afternoon.

While Te Aro and Pipitea students have the city’s eateries at their doorstep, it is a truth universally acknowledged that the food for sale on Kelburn Campus is, um, pricey. Students often get frustrated about this, because when you’re on campus for upwards of 12 hours, it is really hard to pack enough food to get you through that time. By the time the night falls, and your assignment is due, swiping your card (why!?) on the vending machine seems like a completely rational thing to do.

It can make me feel pretty defeated when I do this – why is it so hard to get cheap affordable food on campus? And whose idea was it to build the Hub, a giant common space for students, without a student kitchenette? Tough questions. Here are my top five tips for spending as little money as possible on campus:

1) Use the microwaves – Law School and Te Aro common room, VUWSA offices. This year, we’ve put microwaves into our offices, alongside a toaster and a jug. It means my office often smells like burnt toast, but it’s great for heating up soup. It’s currently open 9–5.

2) Krishna food behind Kirk. $5 lunch since forever, including dessert! Too many students haven’t heard of Krishna food, so go check it out.

3) 4 pm deals. Half-price sushi and half-price Hunter Lounge food. It’s not always on, but cheap sushi and Hunter Lounge food is the best thing to scope out in the late afternoon. If you’re in for a long night, what could be better than three cartons of sushi for cheap?

4) Ilott Café in Kirk does burgers and they are HUGE – like, toothpick-through-the-middle huge – and decently priced. When I first bought one, I got mustard and aioli all over my hands, but it was such a good feed that I didn’t mind. A seriously good deal.

5) Get involved in the change for affordable food. A group of students have started working on a food co-op – a model where bulk food is purchased to keep the cost down for all. Search ‘VUW Food Co-op’ on Facebook for more info.

P.S. Don’t forget to vote in the VUWSA Executive election. All students will receive an email inviting you to vote on Wednesday. Remember to vote by 5 pm Friday, and to get informed and ask questions about the different candidates.

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