Viewport width =
September 21, 2014 | by  | in Online Only |
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

Take 5 for Students: Meatballs

Take 5 Meatballs
Minced beef, sundried tomatoes, tomato sauce, egg, diced tomatoes.

I made these meatballs for my niece and nephew who know what they like to eat.

Mix together a packet of minced beef with a few finely chopped sundried tomatoes, a squirt of tomato sauce (adds a bit of sweetness and a bit of spice) and a beaten egg – and season well.

Shape meatballs and place them in a dish with a splash of oil. Tip over a can or two of diced tomatoes, and add another squeeze of tomato sauce. Cook in the oven at about 180°C (350°F) till the meatballs are cooked and the tomatoes form a saucy thing.

We served this on orzo, which was highly approved of my sister’s children. Orzo looks like rice but it’s pasta – I guess it would take an Italian to explain that one. Cook the orzo in boiling water – then drain, season and stir about with another splash of olive oil. My student-children tell me students on a shoestring may not pay for olive oil, but I am telling you now: you must! For the price of a glass of wine, you can buy a bottle of olive oil. Just do it. You won’t miss that one drink, and the oil will last for quite a long time as a Take 5 for Students component.

– Margôt de Cotesworth

Take 5 and Cook: cooking fabulous food with just 5 ingredients. Read the Take 5 Diary for more free recipes: http://bit.ly/t5diary

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

About the Author ()

Comments are closed.

Recent posts

  1. Hello!
  2. Misc
  3. On Optimism
  4. Speak for yourself
  5. JonBenét
  6. Ten things I wish my friends knew about being Māori
  7. 2016 Statistics
  8. I Wrote for Salient for Four Years for Dick and Free Speech
  9. Stop Liking and Commenting on Your Mates’ New Facebook Friendships
  10. Victoria Takes Learning Global
pink

Editor's Pick

Ten things I wish my friends knew about being Māori

: - SPONSORED - 1). I wish my friends knew that when they ask me what “percentage” of Māori I am—half, quarter, or eighth—they make me feel like a human pie chart. I don’t know how people can ask this so nonchalantly, but they do. So I want to let you know: this is a ver