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Issue , 2014

The Mental Health Issue

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News

  • Land of Milk and Honey

  • Campus Digest

  • VUWSA Chooses Choice

  • Uni Council Elections

  • Head to head: Should Vic close the Maori Business programme?

  • Land of Milk and Honey

  • Campus Digest

  • VUWSA Chooses Choice

  • Uni Council Elections

  • Head to head: Should Vic close the Maori Business programme?

  • Healthy Minds on Campus – How to Boost Your Mood

  • Features

  • ashesirise

    Out of the ashes I rise

    It was never meant to be me. My life was mapped out. Go straight from high school to university, graduate with top marks, have a high-powered career. I was the smart one, the successful one. Not the crazy one.

    by

  • charlottesupportneedssupporting

    When the Supporter Needs Supporting

    The support you provide someone who is suffering from depression is invaluable. No one person, however, can provide a ‘cure’; it is important to realise that the most positive way to contribute to someone else’s wellbeing is to look after your own

    by

  • unsafespaces

    Unsafe Spaces

    In the process of preventing my illness from defining me, am I supposed to excise its importance in my life entirely? I think often about how my mental illness has developed me as a person.

    by

  • Mental illness is a part of life: let’s talk about it

    One in four people in New Zealand are likely to experience a mental illness. One in every five families have a parent with a mental illness or addiction. And university students have lower levels of wellbeing compared to the rest of the population (Tertiary Health Survey, 2013), so it is quite likely you know or care for someone who is experiencing mental illness.

    by

  • nicolaitsnotyou

    It’s not you, it’s me… kinda.

    When my boyfriend and I had been dating for about two months, I did what I’d been dreading. I anxiety-ed in front of him. He told me his grades and I absolutely panicked.

    by

  • hilaryatoz

    An A-Z of Fluctuation

    This weird alphabet thing is me trying to reiterate that it’s something to be open to, should you find yourself in more than just a low point.

    by

  • ashesirise

    Out of the ashes I rise

    It was never meant to be me. My life was mapped out. Go straight from high school to university, graduate with top marks, have a high-powered career. I was the smart one, the successful one. Not the crazy one.

    by

  • charlottesupportneedssupporting

    When the Supporter Needs Supporting

    The support you provide someone who is suffering from depression is invaluable. No one person, however, can provide a ‘cure’; it is important to realise that the most positive way to contribute to someone else’s wellbeing is to look after your own

    by

  • unsafespaces

    Unsafe Spaces

    In the process of preventing my illness from defining me, am I supposed to excise its importance in my life entirely? I think often about how my mental illness has developed me as a person.

    by

  • Mental illness is a part of life: let’s talk about it

    One in four people in New Zealand are likely to experience a mental illness. One in every five families have a parent with a mental illness or addiction. And university students have lower levels of wellbeing compared to the rest of the population (Tertiary Health Survey, 2013), so it is quite likely you know or care for someone who is experiencing mental illness.

    by

  • nicolaitsnotyou

    It’s not you, it’s me… kinda.

    When my boyfriend and I had been dating for about two months, I did what I’d been dreading. I anxiety-ed in front of him. He told me his grades and I absolutely panicked.

    by

  • hilaryatoz

    An A-Z of Fluctuation

    This weird alphabet thing is me trying to reiterate that it’s something to be open to, should you find yourself in more than just a low point.

    by

  • weneedtotalk300x200

    We Need to Talk

    In 2012, I, a queer youth, became manically depressed…

    by

  • Under Pressure

    Mental health is a topic that most of us find hard to understand and even harder to talk about. But as the pressures faced by the modern student increase every year, the lines for Victoria’s Student Counselling Services just keep getting longer.

    by

  • ashesirise

    Out of the ashes I rise

    It was never meant to be me. My life was mapped out. Go straight from high school to university, graduate with top marks, have a high-powered career. I was the smart one, the successful one. Not the crazy one.

    by

  • charlottesupportneedssupporting

    When the Supporter Needs Supporting

    The support you provide someone who is suffering from depression is invaluable. No one person, however, can provide a ‘cure’; it is important to realise that the most positive way to contribute to someone else’s wellbeing is to look after your own

    by

  • unsafespaces

    Unsafe Spaces

    In the process of preventing my illness from defining me, am I supposed to excise its importance in my life entirely? I think often about how my mental illness has developed me as a person.

    by

  • Mental illness is a part of life: let’s talk about it

    One in four people in New Zealand are likely to experience a mental illness. One in every five families have a parent with a mental illness or addiction. And university students have lower levels of wellbeing compared to the rest of the population (Tertiary Health Survey, 2013), so it is quite likely you know or care for someone who is experiencing mental illness.

    by

  • nicolaitsnotyou

    It’s not you, it’s me… kinda.

    When my boyfriend and I had been dating for about two months, I did what I’d been dreading. I anxiety-ed in front of him. He told me his grades and I absolutely panicked.

    by

  • hilaryatoz

    An A-Z of Fluctuation

    This weird alphabet thing is me trying to reiterate that it’s something to be open to, should you find yourself in more than just a low point.

    by

  • ashesirise

    Out of the ashes I rise

    It was never meant to be me. My life was mapped out. Go straight from high school to university, graduate with top marks, have a high-powered career. I was the smart one, the successful one. Not the crazy one.

    by

  • charlottesupportneedssupporting

    When the Supporter Needs Supporting

    The support you provide someone who is suffering from depression is invaluable. No one person, however, can provide a ‘cure’; it is important to realise that the most positive way to contribute to someone else’s wellbeing is to look after your own

    by

  • unsafespaces

    Unsafe Spaces

    In the process of preventing my illness from defining me, am I supposed to excise its importance in my life entirely? I think often about how my mental illness has developed me as a person.

    by

  • Mental illness is a part of life: let’s talk about it

    One in four people in New Zealand are likely to experience a mental illness. One in every five families have a parent with a mental illness or addiction. And university students have lower levels of wellbeing compared to the rest of the population (Tertiary Health Survey, 2013), so it is quite likely you know or care for someone who is experiencing mental illness.

    by

  • nicolaitsnotyou

    It’s not you, it’s me… kinda.

    When my boyfriend and I had been dating for about two months, I did what I’d been dreading. I anxiety-ed in front of him. He told me his grades and I absolutely panicked.

    by

  • hilaryatoz

    An A-Z of Fluctuation

    This weird alphabet thing is me trying to reiterate that it’s something to be open to, should you find yourself in more than just a low point.

    by

  • weneedtotalk300x200

    We Need to Talk

    In 2012, I, a queer youth, became manically depressed…

    by

  • Under Pressure

    Mental health is a topic that most of us find hard to understand and even harder to talk about. But as the pressures faced by the modern student increase every year, the lines for Victoria’s Student Counselling Services just keep getting longer.

    by

  • Arts and Science

  • Best New Zealand Books of 2014 (so far)

    Lamplighter, Kerry Donovan Brown
    Lamplighter has been called a ‘crossover’ novel complex enough for adults and teens alike, but I think that’s a bit condescending, as if all YA books must be ‘easy’. Lamplighter is never easy. It goes far deeper than your average coming-of-age and coming-out tale. It asks questions about fear, identity and prejudice. It invents a richly layered alternate universe. And it grapples with darkness in a compelling and beautiful way that’s rarely been done in New Zealand fiction for young adults before. It feels like it could be the first in a series – let’s hope it is.

    Horse with Hat, Marty Smith
    This book won Marty Smith the Best First Book Award for poetry at the NZ Post Book Awards last month. It’s well deserved; I knew as soon as I read it that these poems would stick with me. Her poems trace footprints of family history (or should I say hoofprints?) and childhood memories with measured force and beautiful poetics. Her images are raw and intense, often giving the impression of standing by the side of the road when a car swooshes past and shakes the air in front of your face, tipping you backwards. This is a gutsy book of poems that deserves to be read.

    Where the Rekohu Bone Sings, Tina Makereti
    Tina Makereti currently teaches a new creative-writing workshop for Māori and Pasifika writers at the IIML. Her critically acclaimed debut novel lives up to her brilliant short-story collection, Once Upon a Time in Aotearoa. It traces the stories of two young couples: one in the 1880s in the Marlborough Sounds, one in the 21st century. The mythic and the domestic collide, as do different kinds of identity: what does it mean to be Pākehā, Māori and Moriori across generational, cultural and geographical divides? As well as a terrific story, the historical aspects are especially compelling.

    Rough on Women, Dame Margaret Sparrow
    “Stories of the women who died are important because otherwise their voices remain silent.” This account of abortion in 19th-century New Zealand is pieced together from newspaper clippings, advertisements, diaries, letters, court reports, catalogued objects and photographs. This evidence unearths the silenced voices of women who underwent abortions at a time when it was dangerous, inaccessible, and rarely spoken of. Margaret Sparrow writes factually and simply, making for a quick read. Rough on Women is an essential addition to the study of New Zealand history. It’s a reminder of how far we’ve come in terms of women’s reproductive rights, but also that the fight’s not over yet.

    Puna Wai Kōrero: An Anthology of Māori Poetry in English, edited by Robert Sullivan and Reina Whaitiri
    This recently released anthology is the first of its kind. It collects new poets, old poets, Māori poets in New Zealand, and Māori poets abroad. Famous prose writers feature, such as Keri Hulme and Witi Ihimaera, as well as accomplished poets Hinemoana Baker and Apirana Taylor. In subject, voice and poetic form, the poems are diverse and surprising. Hopefully, this book marks the beginning of more Māori voices included in English-literature courses at schools and universities, and a greater understanding of the importance of poetry in historical and contemporary Māori culture.

    Incomplete Works, Dylan Horrocks
    This beautiful collection of comics draws from Horrocks’ 30-ish years of writing. It’s a collection full of stunned pauses that leave you marvelling at how well-crafted the thing is. It moves through scratchy zines, the angularly surreal, and ending somewhere in the not-too-distant future, with an illustrated diary entry in part documenting the writing of an upcoming graphic novel. Incomplete Works is not only a great introduction to Horrocks’ writing but to New Zealand comics as a whole.

    The Inequality Debate, Max Rashbrooke
    Max Rashbrooke’s slender yet well-researched book lays bare the global problem of income inequality, confirming that New Zealand is one of the OECD’s worst offenders. It makes for grim reading. Of the 2.9 million working adults in New Zealand, just 29,000 control 16 per cent of the country’s combined wealth. Rashbrooke breaks down what income inequality actually is and how the world and New Zealand has descended into such an unequal quagmire. The Inequality Debate is fascinating and horrifying. Published as part of Bridget Williams Books’ BWB Texts series, it’s so short that you’ve got no excuse.

    by

  • Best Films of 2014 (so far)

    This film year was…

    Action-packed. Hollywood is money-hungry and thinks generic action films are the golden answer of how to make billions. Captain America, The Hunger Games, X-Men: Days of Future Past, The Amazing Spider-Man 2, The Expendables 3, Transformers, Divergent, Guardians of the Galaxy, Edge of Tomorrow, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (since when were they still a thing?), Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, Hercules and Godzilla. Inundate audiences with blockbusters featuring the same dramatic soundtrack… who wouldn’t repeatedly invest in that type of experience?

    Thrilling. Predestination was a mindfuck. 5 stars. Better than Inception.

    Healthy for Seth Rogen in alleviating confusion with Jonah Hill (22 Jump Street) and boosting the sex appeal of Zac Efron (Bad Neighbours).

    Falling flat on musicals. This was a lacklustre year for films of song and dance, with none particularly singing out to audiences. Unless your profound love for Ricky Gervais transcends the plot of Muppets Most Wanted. Then again, perhaps it’s wise to avoid bias as One Direction: Where We Are – The Concert Film was released, which some may consider heaven-ordained. Jersey Boys, directed by Clint Eastwood, also had a fantastic finale, sparking addictions to the song ‘What a Night’ for one viewer in particular. Has anyone thought of a musical modern-day Western… there’s an undervalued market.

    Postman Pat: The Movie happened.

    New Zealand’s claim to the vampire. Taika Waititi’s Kiwi twist on the recurring vampire theme with What We Do in the Shadows was a highly positive addition to the New Zealand cinemascape (and Wellington landscape) this year. For Victoria students, it was particularly special with its nostalgic footage of The Big K.

    Richard Linklater. The film Boyhood scored 100% on Rotten Tomatoes and was praised by Peter Bradshaw (The Guardian) as one of the greatest films of the decade. The successful achievement of the ambitious goal to create a film over 12 years is enough in itself, and a touching storyline makes it a poignant addition to the director’s collection of challenging independent films.

    A new direction for Scarlett Johansson. With leading roles in Under the Skin and Lucy, she pushed her acting repertoire into darker territory yet simultaneously proved to continue to be horrendously attractive even as the voice of a computer in Her. Multitalented.

    Full of innovation… Someone thought it would be a good idea to transform the classic computer game Tetris into a blockbuster film. The excitement is building, yet the teaser trailer does not provide nearly as much light relief as the game. Not sure of its chances to be a winner. The Lego Movie has set the standards quite high with animating colourful blocks. It sets an interesting precedent, however. Candy Crush the Movie: Level 1 as the ultimate interactive experience requiring the audience to pay a little extra when in need of top-ups, and with never-ending ‘sequels’; it could happen.

    by

  • The Best Music of 2014 (So Far)

    2013 was a banner year for albums. Yeezus. Modern Vampires. Nothing Was the Same. 2014 feels like more of a single year, so far at least – so here’s five albums and ten songs (in no order).

    Five albums

    Modern Baseball – You’re Gonna Miss It All

    Modern Baseball are young enough to make you jealous, young enough to still put a song called ‘Your Graduation’ on their sophomore (literally) album, young enough to take a pop-punk song through three soaring movements, young enough to end a song with a mumbled request to have dinner with someone, and I fucking love it.

    Perfect Pussy – Say Yes to Love

    Since when did we give up? Since when did we say yes to love? Nobody felt as angry as Perfect Pussy this year, as urgent. If you really want to lose yourself in redemptive rage, to become part of a wall of noise much larger than yourself, this album is perfect.

    FKA Twigs – LP1

    You’ve never had sex this good.

    Lykke Li – I Never Learn

    A perfectly controlled collection of ballads, a tour de force in minimal songwriting and a ridiculous vocal range. This album feels like sitting on a beach with your best friend at 5 am while they talk over a huge problem with you, but in a good way (promise).

    YG – My Krazy Life

    YG’s debut will fall off year-end hip-hop lists once Nicki and Kanye and Kendrick drop their new stuff, but it’ll be a shame. This collection of relentless hooks and storytelling verses is exactly the kind of shit every afternoon drive requires, even if you can’t sing along to the chorus of the lead single.

    Ten songs

    TY Dollar $ign – ‘Or Nah (Remix feat. The Weeknd & Wiz Khalifa)’

    What a disgusting fucking song. The Weeknd makes ‘Or Nah’, lecherously asking us about our sexual limits in the first verse and then padding the rest of the song with his OxyContin-sweet voice.

    Nicki Minaj – ‘Anaconda’

    Yes, we know you prefer ‘rap-Nicki’, we know you have an *opinion* about the video, but Nicki doesn’t give a fuck about your opinion; hell, she doesn’t even care about DRAKE’S opinion. Pop song of the year: fuck ‘Fancy’.

    MAS YSA – ‘Shame’

    MAS YSA is clearly getting over something, reeling us into some kind of breakdown/epiphany of whispered lyrics and broken yelling, complete with synths that feel like skyscrapers jumping up and down.

    Hundred Waters – ‘Murmurs’

    Some lyrics reveal themselves over time as smart; some lyrics just immediately take you over. “I wish you could see what I see”, when finally stuttered out over a wall of watery synths during ‘Murmurs’, is in the latter camp.

    Sophie – ‘Lemonade’

    Halfway through ‘Lemonade’, after a trap-buildup of stuttered lyrics and watery pops, everything changes. Suddenly we’re in a K-pop song, a glittering surface of saccharine vocals and hyperactive synths. Then all the heaviness works its way back in. Song of the year.

    Rustie – ‘Attak (feat. Danny Brown)’

    Making Danny Brown lose his breath is tricky, but Rustie manages it, and man is it fun. An apt title.

    Grimes – ‘Go’

    I don’t care if Rihanna rejected this, I don’t care if Grimes-purists are worrying about it being too fun, I don’t care that Grimes apparently threw away the rest of album this was on – this is everything a party song should be.

    AG Cook – ‘Keri Baby (feat. Hannah Diamond)’

    The more I listen to PC Music, the more I’m convinced that their music is coming back to us through a temporal rift from 2024. ‘Keri Baby’ is a perfect slice of their insane aesthetic, and the kind of thing that almost makes the phrase ‘post-ironic’ okay.

    A Sunny Day in Glasgow – ‘Bye Bye Big Ocean (The End)’

    For a song that starts with a wall of noise that once literally knocked me off my feet, ‘Bye Bye Big Ocean’ is surprisingly sweet. This is a song of parts, of soaring choruses, urgent noise, and tender breakdowns. A journey.

    Drake – ‘0 to 100 / The Catch Up’

    That beat, Jesus Christ. It’s just two notes, a few drums, a haunting melody somewhere off in the distance, and Drake having a whole lot of fun on top of it. Braggadocio-Drake remains the best Drake, by an inch, but this song shows both of his sides perfectly. Being humble don’t work as well as being prepared.

    Ryan Hemsworth – ‘Snow in Newark (feat. Dawn Golden)’

    Nobody makes you feel empty and vulnerable like Ryan. Everything here – the long-distance lyrics, the assortment of warm instruments, the echoing vocal samples – everything combines to completely take your feelings over. This is the kind of song the repeat button was made for.

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  • Year in Review: Theatre

    All year, Rose and I have brought you news, reviews and interviews about theatre in Wellington. To fill the gaping hole in your brain that will be empty once Salient’s What’s On page is no longer, here are four events to keep you company over the summer months.

    The Two Noble Kinsmen

    Between 7 and 11 October, Victoria University’s THEA301 class will undertake a production of William Shakespeare and John Fletcher’s The Two Noble Kinsmen.

    The little-known play, which is loosely based on A Knight’s Tale by Chaucer, is about two cousins, Palamon and Arcite, who fall in love at first sight with the fair lady Emilia. The pair’s friendship is tested when it is decided they must fight to the death for the love of Emilia. Meanwhile, the daughter of a Jailer falls in love with one of the cousins, Palamon, but loses herself in the woods in the fight to allure her man. In the end, one man gets his bride, but is there really a winner?

    The Two Noble Kinsmen will be directed by Lori Leigh, who wrote the excellent Revelations which premiered at BATS Theatre earlier in the year. This production of The Two Noble Kinsmen will be part of Shakespeare’s Globe Centre New Zealand’s 2014 Shakespeare Lives, a celebration of the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth including performances of the entire canon filmed for YouTube.

    To book, email theatre@vuw.ac.nz
    7–11 October, 7 pm at Studio 77.
    $8 unwaged, $15 waged.

    Summer Shakespeare

    Every summer in the Wellington Botanic Gardens, Victoria University stages a production of a Shakespeare play. While many of you might have seen the Sons of Anarchy version of Macbeth this year or the Anthony and Cleopatra last year, next year’s Summer Shakespeare will literally be a once-in-a-century event. Timon of Athens has not been produced in New Zealand for 150 years. The last full production of it in New Zealand was at the Princess Theatre in Dunedin in 1865.

    Directed by the Toi Whakaari’s head of directing Bret Adams, Timon of Athens ranks as one of the more obscure plays in Shakespeare’s canon. The story tells the tale of a man who lives a life of opulence, hosting lavish parties and mingling with Athens’ elite and privileged. But the moment his cash runs out, his wealthy friends all turn their backs on him. Exchanging the comforts of the city for the harsh realities of the wilderness, Timon is forced to confront some harsh truths about humanity.

    The show will open on 13 February 2015. For more information about Summer Shakespeare, visit their website summershakespeare.co.nz.

    New Zealand Fringe Festival

    Wellington is home to New Zealand’s finest fringe festival. Fringe is a four-week event encompassing comedians, theatre-makers, artists, musicians and dancers coming together to showcase their work. It is a perfect launching pad for young artists of any discipline. There are no limits in the New Zealand Fringe Festival. You’re welcome to create anything.

    Wellington truly comes alive during the Fringe as there are events almost every night. It’s cheap for audience members as well. 50 per cent of the shows at the 2014 Fringe Festival were either free or koha. So you have no excuses.

    The 2014 festival was the biggest yet, attracting 120 acts not just from around the country from across the world. Last year’s Tiki Tour Award Winner The Bookbinder has been truly inspiring. They are currently at Melbourne Fringe after performing to SOLD-OUT audiences in Sydney Fringe.

    Registrations close on 8 October, and for more information, visit their website fringe.co.nz.

    BATS Theatre Flies Home

    In 2012, BATS Theatre faced an uncertain future. The original owners of their Kent Tce building decided to sell up, and, unable to raise the cash to buy the building, they were faced with closure.

    Luckily, thanks to Peter Jackson, the building was salvaged. However, while their original Kent Tce home was undergoing earthquake strengthening, BATS has been located out of site at the former location of The Big Kumara on Dixon St.

    In late November, they will finally move back to a brand-new and refurbished theatre space. Thanks to a generous crowdfunding campaign which raised over $6000 more than their $25,000 target, their new building will contain a newly refurbished black box theatre space, a new performance space upstairs, a new bar and foyer, office, green room and dressing-room spaces.

    My Accomplice will be christening the newly reopened BATS Theatre on 22 November with their commission STAB show.

    BATS Theatre is a Wellington cultural treasure that we came very close to losing a few years ago. I urge you all to support the new venue so it can maintain the resources to foster new and emerging talent.

    by

  • Some Shows to Watch

    Orders from on high to produce something along the lines of a ‘Best Of’ playlist for TV. I don’t know much about TV, so thought we could just have some shows in here that you might like to watch at some point, or not, even though some of them aren’t that recent. In no particular order:

    Broad City: Just in case you haven’t seen this already. Pretty funny. Skirts the line between being nicely comedic and a little bit far-fetched. There are actually some sinister little jokes regarding sinister men, I thought, which got serious. And they smoke a lot of weed – if you don’t like that, then don’t worry about this show. Further, it’s a good example of American humour hitting its stride a little more than usual. Briskness, or something. This one’s also quite cool in terms of editing and sound, too. Anyway, that should be enough for what seems to be quite a popular show.

    Rick and Morty: Lots of people have probably seen this already, too. But anyway, animated sitcom which aired on Cartoon Network last year. It’s created in part by Dan Harmon, the dude who also did Community. However, if you’re one of the many people who kind of hated Community, don’t fear. This cartoon is quite different. Premise is your usual family setup, except instead of a talking dog or alien or Kenny or whatever, there’s this grandfather, Rick, who is sort of like an alcoholic super scientist. Rick and his grandson Morty have adventures. It’s one of the most creative things I’ve seen in a while. And some of the jokes about the state of affairs in our communities at the moment are actually just ruthless. But good. Additionally, the writing is some of the best you’ll come across. It’s odd watching an animated sitcom that manages to do dialogue in a very uncontrived way. Another word for that would be authentic, I guess, but I try to stay away from that one as much as possible. Moving on.

    True Detective: Just watch it.

    Transparent: Not really sure about this one. I’ve just watched the pilot episode and it looks like it could be okay. Though the pun in the title really devalues the entire thing to me. Anyway it’s a sitcom, so again, the family themes. But this time, the father is transgender, and so I assume most of the action of the show is built around the way that fact affects the lives of this woman’s children, friends and her ex-wife. For once, it looks like the transgender stuff is gonna be handled well and with empathy instead of it being framed as otherness. But I’ve only seen one episode. Worth a watch. Also, it looks like this might be slightly different from a genre perspective, because despite being given the sitcom format (20-min eps), there’s clearly a wider narrative forming and so each episode is dependant on the last, instead of being standalone, as a sitcom typically would be. Interesting.

    The Affair: This one hasn’t actually aired yet. But it’s got Dominic West from The Wire and also Ruth Wilson from Luther. It could be good, it could be bad, but I’m gonna see what it’s about on 12 October.

    Fargo: I’m sure lots of you have seen this. I actually don’t have much time for it, personally, but there’s a lot of hype and so I’m sure it’s worth the watch. Especially if you’re into the original film. The show doesn’t really seem to have quite the same individuality of the film, and that’s not really all so surprising given the Coen Bros don’t write this (though they are executive-producing, which is a trendy thing to do a the moment). However, the show does retain the quirkiness of its namesake, and that’s something you might enjoy. Also a good one if you’re a fan of Martin Freeman or Billy Bob Thornton.

    Sherlock: If you haven’t seen this, you live in a rock, or whatever that saying is.

    Girls: Again, just watch it.

    House of Cards: I thought the second season got a little bit out of hand myself, though other people vehemently argue it’s totally in keeping with the narrative arc that we’ve been working towards since episode one. If you haven’t seen the first season, definitely watch that. Interesting show in that they release a season at a time. Think it was the first show to do this.

    To leave you with some sparkling conversation: dogs can’t watch TV; Western Australia is 3.6 times larger than Texas and has only eight Domino’s Pizzas; and hot water freezes faster than cold.

    by

  • The Year in Art Crime

    Art is robust. We’ve spent at least the last century declaring it dead and yet here it is, making a lot of money, alienating the masses, wearing black and scowling. Perhaps, then, it is a matter of strategy. Art can’t be killed by a manifesto, or the undermining of the fetishised object: its death may, just maybe, be brought about by small gestures. This is a feeble conceit, but we go to print in a few hours and as I write this I am lying on my back on a bloodstained leather recliner and a large, hairy man is tattooing the words ‘I HAVE GIVEN UP’ across my forehead. So, without further ado, I present to you a short list of tiny chinks in the very sturdy armour of cultural hegemony, a few triumphant acts of iconoclasm in the service of a revolution no one is really interested in.

    • In February, Máximo Caminero, a Florida artist, destroyed a painted Ai Weiwei vase (valued at $1 million) on display at the Pérez Art Museum Miami. Caminero said the vandalism was an act of protest against the museum’s neglect of local artists in favour of blockbuster names. Behind the installation of vases was a set of three photographs depicting Weiwei holding and then dropping a Ming-dynasty vase. Caminero said any symbolism was unintended.

    • Also in February, a cleaner at the Flip Project Space in southern Italy accidentally threw away a Sala Murat piece. Security guards noticed several items were missing from the installation, which was comprised of pieces of newspaper and cookie-cutters, and reported to gallery administration. BBC News quoted the city’s marketing commissioner as saying, “It’s clear the cleaning person did not realise she had thrown away two works and their value. But this is all about the artists who have been able to better interpret the meaning of contemporary art, which is to interact with the environment… In any case, the insurance will cover the damages caused.”

    • On 9 March, criminal charges were filed against El Salvadoran artist Víctor “Crack” Rodríguez for a performance piece in which he is seen eating a ballot paper. No subsequent information about the charges has been published since late March, but if Rodríguez is convicted, he could face up to six years in jail.

    • A 61-year-old man in Kingscliff, Australia led police on a 300 m chase on a toy scooter after spray-painting the words “Dumb Cops” and “Kingy Boyz Rule”, as well as other illegible slogans, on the local police station. The man managed to injure two police officers during the altercation. A police representative was quoted as saying, “It’s not our usual type of graffiti suspect, at that age.”

    • The Louvre’s Tuileries Garden is infested with rats. Administrators blamed the infestation on litter left by picnicking tourists. Poison has been left in the Garden since July to try to combat the rodent problem, but rat sympathisers have been, for months, removing it.

    • In August, Canadian performance artist Istvan Kantor smeared his own blood on the walls of the Whitney Museum where a Jeff Koons retrospective was taking place. The museum was promptly closed for cleaning and Kantor sent to a psychiatric institution for evaluation. Kantor, who is a member of the Neoist movement, has engaged in interventionist performance pieces since the 1970s. In 2004, he threw a vial of his blood at a Paul McCarthy sculpture in Berlin.

    • In September, a nine-foot-tall statue of a bright-red-skinned, particularly well endowed Satan posed in a devil-horn salute was, ahem, erected in a park in Vancouver. The statue, which was visible from the main commuter line of Vancouver’s SkyTrain, was promptly removed as it was “not officially commissioned by the city”. As yet, no one has taken responsibility for the piece.

    • A Utah man charged with vandalising a Banksy was last month ordered to pay a US$13,000 fine or face jail time. The Banksy murals, which were painted illegally on private property in 2010, were encased in Plexiglas by the city to preserve them. The money is intended to cover the cost of restoring the paintings, and to replace the Plexiglas.

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  • Best New Zealand Books of 2014 (so far)

    Lamplighter, Kerry Donovan Brown
    Lamplighter has been called a ‘crossover’ novel complex enough for adults and teens alike, but I think that’s a bit condescending, as if all YA books must be ‘easy’. Lamplighter is never easy. It goes far deeper than your average coming-of-age and coming-out tale. It asks questions about fear, identity and prejudice. It invents a richly layered alternate universe. And it grapples with darkness in a compelling and beautiful way that’s rarely been done in New Zealand fiction for young adults before. It feels like it could be the first in a series – let’s hope it is.

    Horse with Hat, Marty Smith
    This book won Marty Smith the Best First Book Award for poetry at the NZ Post Book Awards last month. It’s well deserved; I knew as soon as I read it that these poems would stick with me. Her poems trace footprints of family history (or should I say hoofprints?) and childhood memories with measured force and beautiful poetics. Her images are raw and intense, often giving the impression of standing by the side of the road when a car swooshes past and shakes the air in front of your face, tipping you backwards. This is a gutsy book of poems that deserves to be read.

    Where the Rekohu Bone Sings, Tina Makereti
    Tina Makereti currently teaches a new creative-writing workshop for Māori and Pasifika writers at the IIML. Her critically acclaimed debut novel lives up to her brilliant short-story collection, Once Upon a Time in Aotearoa. It traces the stories of two young couples: one in the 1880s in the Marlborough Sounds, one in the 21st century. The mythic and the domestic collide, as do different kinds of identity: what does it mean to be Pākehā, Māori and Moriori across generational, cultural and geographical divides? As well as a terrific story, the historical aspects are especially compelling.

    Rough on Women, Dame Margaret Sparrow
    “Stories of the women who died are important because otherwise their voices remain silent.” This account of abortion in 19th-century New Zealand is pieced together from newspaper clippings, advertisements, diaries, letters, court reports, catalogued objects and photographs. This evidence unearths the silenced voices of women who underwent abortions at a time when it was dangerous, inaccessible, and rarely spoken of. Margaret Sparrow writes factually and simply, making for a quick read. Rough on Women is an essential addition to the study of New Zealand history. It’s a reminder of how far we’ve come in terms of women’s reproductive rights, but also that the fight’s not over yet.

    Puna Wai Kōrero: An Anthology of Māori Poetry in English, edited by Robert Sullivan and Reina Whaitiri
    This recently released anthology is the first of its kind. It collects new poets, old poets, Māori poets in New Zealand, and Māori poets abroad. Famous prose writers feature, such as Keri Hulme and Witi Ihimaera, as well as accomplished poets Hinemoana Baker and Apirana Taylor. In subject, voice and poetic form, the poems are diverse and surprising. Hopefully, this book marks the beginning of more Māori voices included in English-literature courses at schools and universities, and a greater understanding of the importance of poetry in historical and contemporary Māori culture.

    Incomplete Works, Dylan Horrocks
    This beautiful collection of comics draws from Horrocks’ 30-ish years of writing. It’s a collection full of stunned pauses that leave you marvelling at how well-crafted the thing is. It moves through scratchy zines, the angularly surreal, and ending somewhere in the not-too-distant future, with an illustrated diary entry in part documenting the writing of an upcoming graphic novel. Incomplete Works is not only a great introduction to Horrocks’ writing but to New Zealand comics as a whole.

    The Inequality Debate, Max Rashbrooke
    Max Rashbrooke’s slender yet well-researched book lays bare the global problem of income inequality, confirming that New Zealand is one of the OECD’s worst offenders. It makes for grim reading. Of the 2.9 million working adults in New Zealand, just 29,000 control 16 per cent of the country’s combined wealth. Rashbrooke breaks down what income inequality actually is and how the world and New Zealand has descended into such an unequal quagmire. The Inequality Debate is fascinating and horrifying. Published as part of Bridget Williams Books’ BWB Texts series, it’s so short that you’ve got no excuse.

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  • Best Films of 2014 (so far)

    This film year was…

    Action-packed. Hollywood is money-hungry and thinks generic action films are the golden answer of how to make billions. Captain America, The Hunger Games, X-Men: Days of Future Past, The Amazing Spider-Man 2, The Expendables 3, Transformers, Divergent, Guardians of the Galaxy, Edge of Tomorrow, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (since when were they still a thing?), Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, Hercules and Godzilla. Inundate audiences with blockbusters featuring the same dramatic soundtrack… who wouldn’t repeatedly invest in that type of experience?

    Thrilling. Predestination was a mindfuck. 5 stars. Better than Inception.

    Healthy for Seth Rogen in alleviating confusion with Jonah Hill (22 Jump Street) and boosting the sex appeal of Zac Efron (Bad Neighbours).

    Falling flat on musicals. This was a lacklustre year for films of song and dance, with none particularly singing out to audiences. Unless your profound love for Ricky Gervais transcends the plot of Muppets Most Wanted. Then again, perhaps it’s wise to avoid bias as One Direction: Where We Are – The Concert Film was released, which some may consider heaven-ordained. Jersey Boys, directed by Clint Eastwood, also had a fantastic finale, sparking addictions to the song ‘What a Night’ for one viewer in particular. Has anyone thought of a musical modern-day Western… there’s an undervalued market.

    Postman Pat: The Movie happened.

    New Zealand’s claim to the vampire. Taika Waititi’s Kiwi twist on the recurring vampire theme with What We Do in the Shadows was a highly positive addition to the New Zealand cinemascape (and Wellington landscape) this year. For Victoria students, it was particularly special with its nostalgic footage of The Big K.

    Richard Linklater. The film Boyhood scored 100% on Rotten Tomatoes and was praised by Peter Bradshaw (The Guardian) as one of the greatest films of the decade. The successful achievement of the ambitious goal to create a film over 12 years is enough in itself, and a touching storyline makes it a poignant addition to the director’s collection of challenging independent films.

    A new direction for Scarlett Johansson. With leading roles in Under the Skin and Lucy, she pushed her acting repertoire into darker territory yet simultaneously proved to continue to be horrendously attractive even as the voice of a computer in Her. Multitalented.

    Full of innovation… Someone thought it would be a good idea to transform the classic computer game Tetris into a blockbuster film. The excitement is building, yet the teaser trailer does not provide nearly as much light relief as the game. Not sure of its chances to be a winner. The Lego Movie has set the standards quite high with animating colourful blocks. It sets an interesting precedent, however. Candy Crush the Movie: Level 1 as the ultimate interactive experience requiring the audience to pay a little extra when in need of top-ups, and with never-ending ‘sequels’; it could happen.

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  • The Best Music of 2014 (So Far)

    2013 was a banner year for albums. Yeezus. Modern Vampires. Nothing Was the Same. 2014 feels like more of a single year, so far at least – so here’s five albums and ten songs (in no order).

    Five albums

    Modern Baseball – You’re Gonna Miss It All

    Modern Baseball are young enough to make you jealous, young enough to still put a song called ‘Your Graduation’ on their sophomore (literally) album, young enough to take a pop-punk song through three soaring movements, young enough to end a song with a mumbled request to have dinner with someone, and I fucking love it.

    Perfect Pussy – Say Yes to Love

    Since when did we give up? Since when did we say yes to love? Nobody felt as angry as Perfect Pussy this year, as urgent. If you really want to lose yourself in redemptive rage, to become part of a wall of noise much larger than yourself, this album is perfect.

    FKA Twigs – LP1

    You’ve never had sex this good.

    Lykke Li – I Never Learn

    A perfectly controlled collection of ballads, a tour de force in minimal songwriting and a ridiculous vocal range. This album feels like sitting on a beach with your best friend at 5 am while they talk over a huge problem with you, but in a good way (promise).

    YG – My Krazy Life

    YG’s debut will fall off year-end hip-hop lists once Nicki and Kanye and Kendrick drop their new stuff, but it’ll be a shame. This collection of relentless hooks and storytelling verses is exactly the kind of shit every afternoon drive requires, even if you can’t sing along to the chorus of the lead single.

    Ten songs

    TY Dollar $ign – ‘Or Nah (Remix feat. The Weeknd & Wiz Khalifa)’

    What a disgusting fucking song. The Weeknd makes ‘Or Nah’, lecherously asking us about our sexual limits in the first verse and then padding the rest of the song with his OxyContin-sweet voice.

    Nicki Minaj – ‘Anaconda’

    Yes, we know you prefer ‘rap-Nicki’, we know you have an *opinion* about the video, but Nicki doesn’t give a fuck about your opinion; hell, she doesn’t even care about DRAKE’S opinion. Pop song of the year: fuck ‘Fancy’.

    MAS YSA – ‘Shame’

    MAS YSA is clearly getting over something, reeling us into some kind of breakdown/epiphany of whispered lyrics and broken yelling, complete with synths that feel like skyscrapers jumping up and down.

    Hundred Waters – ‘Murmurs’

    Some lyrics reveal themselves over time as smart; some lyrics just immediately take you over. “I wish you could see what I see”, when finally stuttered out over a wall of watery synths during ‘Murmurs’, is in the latter camp.

    Sophie – ‘Lemonade’

    Halfway through ‘Lemonade’, after a trap-buildup of stuttered lyrics and watery pops, everything changes. Suddenly we’re in a K-pop song, a glittering surface of saccharine vocals and hyperactive synths. Then all the heaviness works its way back in. Song of the year.

    Rustie – ‘Attak (feat. Danny Brown)’

    Making Danny Brown lose his breath is tricky, but Rustie manages it, and man is it fun. An apt title.

    Grimes – ‘Go’

    I don’t care if Rihanna rejected this, I don’t care if Grimes-purists are worrying about it being too fun, I don’t care that Grimes apparently threw away the rest of album this was on – this is everything a party song should be.

    AG Cook – ‘Keri Baby (feat. Hannah Diamond)’

    The more I listen to PC Music, the more I’m convinced that their music is coming back to us through a temporal rift from 2024. ‘Keri Baby’ is a perfect slice of their insane aesthetic, and the kind of thing that almost makes the phrase ‘post-ironic’ okay.

    A Sunny Day in Glasgow – ‘Bye Bye Big Ocean (The End)’

    For a song that starts with a wall of noise that once literally knocked me off my feet, ‘Bye Bye Big Ocean’ is surprisingly sweet. This is a song of parts, of soaring choruses, urgent noise, and tender breakdowns. A journey.

    Drake – ‘0 to 100 / The Catch Up’

    That beat, Jesus Christ. It’s just two notes, a few drums, a haunting melody somewhere off in the distance, and Drake having a whole lot of fun on top of it. Braggadocio-Drake remains the best Drake, by an inch, but this song shows both of his sides perfectly. Being humble don’t work as well as being prepared.

    Ryan Hemsworth – ‘Snow in Newark (feat. Dawn Golden)’

    Nobody makes you feel empty and vulnerable like Ryan. Everything here – the long-distance lyrics, the assortment of warm instruments, the echoing vocal samples – everything combines to completely take your feelings over. This is the kind of song the repeat button was made for.

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  • Year in Review: Theatre

    All year, Rose and I have brought you news, reviews and interviews about theatre in Wellington. To fill the gaping hole in your brain that will be empty once Salient’s What’s On page is no longer, here are four events to keep you company over the summer months.

    The Two Noble Kinsmen

    Between 7 and 11 October, Victoria University’s THEA301 class will undertake a production of William Shakespeare and John Fletcher’s The Two Noble Kinsmen.

    The little-known play, which is loosely based on A Knight’s Tale by Chaucer, is about two cousins, Palamon and Arcite, who fall in love at first sight with the fair lady Emilia. The pair’s friendship is tested when it is decided they must fight to the death for the love of Emilia. Meanwhile, the daughter of a Jailer falls in love with one of the cousins, Palamon, but loses herself in the woods in the fight to allure her man. In the end, one man gets his bride, but is there really a winner?

    The Two Noble Kinsmen will be directed by Lori Leigh, who wrote the excellent Revelations which premiered at BATS Theatre earlier in the year. This production of The Two Noble Kinsmen will be part of Shakespeare’s Globe Centre New Zealand’s 2014 Shakespeare Lives, a celebration of the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth including performances of the entire canon filmed for YouTube.

    To book, email theatre@vuw.ac.nz
    7–11 October, 7 pm at Studio 77.
    $8 unwaged, $15 waged.

    Summer Shakespeare

    Every summer in the Wellington Botanic Gardens, Victoria University stages a production of a Shakespeare play. While many of you might have seen the Sons of Anarchy version of Macbeth this year or the Anthony and Cleopatra last year, next year’s Summer Shakespeare will literally be a once-in-a-century event. Timon of Athens has not been produced in New Zealand for 150 years. The last full production of it in New Zealand was at the Princess Theatre in Dunedin in 1865.

    Directed by the Toi Whakaari’s head of directing Bret Adams, Timon of Athens ranks as one of the more obscure plays in Shakespeare’s canon. The story tells the tale of a man who lives a life of opulence, hosting lavish parties and mingling with Athens’ elite and privileged. But the moment his cash runs out, his wealthy friends all turn their backs on him. Exchanging the comforts of the city for the harsh realities of the wilderness, Timon is forced to confront some harsh truths about humanity.

    The show will open on 13 February 2015. For more information about Summer Shakespeare, visit their website summershakespeare.co.nz.

    New Zealand Fringe Festival

    Wellington is home to New Zealand’s finest fringe festival. Fringe is a four-week event encompassing comedians, theatre-makers, artists, musicians and dancers coming together to showcase their work. It is a perfect launching pad for young artists of any discipline. There are no limits in the New Zealand Fringe Festival. You’re welcome to create anything.

    Wellington truly comes alive during the Fringe as there are events almost every night. It’s cheap for audience members as well. 50 per cent of the shows at the 2014 Fringe Festival were either free or koha. So you have no excuses.

    The 2014 festival was the biggest yet, attracting 120 acts not just from around the country from across the world. Last year’s Tiki Tour Award Winner The Bookbinder has been truly inspiring. They are currently at Melbourne Fringe after performing to SOLD-OUT audiences in Sydney Fringe.

    Registrations close on 8 October, and for more information, visit their website fringe.co.nz.

    BATS Theatre Flies Home

    In 2012, BATS Theatre faced an uncertain future. The original owners of their Kent Tce building decided to sell up, and, unable to raise the cash to buy the building, they were faced with closure.

    Luckily, thanks to Peter Jackson, the building was salvaged. However, while their original Kent Tce home was undergoing earthquake strengthening, BATS has been located out of site at the former location of The Big Kumara on Dixon St.

    In late November, they will finally move back to a brand-new and refurbished theatre space. Thanks to a generous crowdfunding campaign which raised over $6000 more than their $25,000 target, their new building will contain a newly refurbished black box theatre space, a new performance space upstairs, a new bar and foyer, office, green room and dressing-room spaces.

    My Accomplice will be christening the newly reopened BATS Theatre on 22 November with their commission STAB show.

    BATS Theatre is a Wellington cultural treasure that we came very close to losing a few years ago. I urge you all to support the new venue so it can maintain the resources to foster new and emerging talent.

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  • Some Shows to Watch

    Orders from on high to produce something along the lines of a ‘Best Of’ playlist for TV. I don’t know much about TV, so thought we could just have some shows in here that you might like to watch at some point, or not, even though some of them aren’t that recent. In no particular order:

    Broad City: Just in case you haven’t seen this already. Pretty funny. Skirts the line between being nicely comedic and a little bit far-fetched. There are actually some sinister little jokes regarding sinister men, I thought, which got serious. And they smoke a lot of weed – if you don’t like that, then don’t worry about this show. Further, it’s a good example of American humour hitting its stride a little more than usual. Briskness, or something. This one’s also quite cool in terms of editing and sound, too. Anyway, that should be enough for what seems to be quite a popular show.

    Rick and Morty: Lots of people have probably seen this already, too. But anyway, animated sitcom which aired on Cartoon Network last year. It’s created in part by Dan Harmon, the dude who also did Community. However, if you’re one of the many people who kind of hated Community, don’t fear. This cartoon is quite different. Premise is your usual family setup, except instead of a talking dog or alien or Kenny or whatever, there’s this grandfather, Rick, who is sort of like an alcoholic super scientist. Rick and his grandson Morty have adventures. It’s one of the most creative things I’ve seen in a while. And some of the jokes about the state of affairs in our communities at the moment are actually just ruthless. But good. Additionally, the writing is some of the best you’ll come across. It’s odd watching an animated sitcom that manages to do dialogue in a very uncontrived way. Another word for that would be authentic, I guess, but I try to stay away from that one as much as possible. Moving on.

    True Detective: Just watch it.

    Transparent: Not really sure about this one. I’ve just watched the pilot episode and it looks like it could be okay. Though the pun in the title really devalues the entire thing to me. Anyway it’s a sitcom, so again, the family themes. But this time, the father is transgender, and so I assume most of the action of the show is built around the way that fact affects the lives of this woman’s children, friends and her ex-wife. For once, it looks like the transgender stuff is gonna be handled well and with empathy instead of it being framed as otherness. But I’ve only seen one episode. Worth a watch. Also, it looks like this might be slightly different from a genre perspective, because despite being given the sitcom format (20-min eps), there’s clearly a wider narrative forming and so each episode is dependant on the last, instead of being standalone, as a sitcom typically would be. Interesting.

    The Affair: This one hasn’t actually aired yet. But it’s got Dominic West from The Wire and also Ruth Wilson from Luther. It could be good, it could be bad, but I’m gonna see what it’s about on 12 October.

    Fargo: I’m sure lots of you have seen this. I actually don’t have much time for it, personally, but there’s a lot of hype and so I’m sure it’s worth the watch. Especially if you’re into the original film. The show doesn’t really seem to have quite the same individuality of the film, and that’s not really all so surprising given the Coen Bros don’t write this (though they are executive-producing, which is a trendy thing to do a the moment). However, the show does retain the quirkiness of its namesake, and that’s something you might enjoy. Also a good one if you’re a fan of Martin Freeman or Billy Bob Thornton.

    Sherlock: If you haven’t seen this, you live in a rock, or whatever that saying is.

    Girls: Again, just watch it.

    House of Cards: I thought the second season got a little bit out of hand myself, though other people vehemently argue it’s totally in keeping with the narrative arc that we’ve been working towards since episode one. If you haven’t seen the first season, definitely watch that. Interesting show in that they release a season at a time. Think it was the first show to do this.

    To leave you with some sparkling conversation: dogs can’t watch TV; Western Australia is 3.6 times larger than Texas and has only eight Domino’s Pizzas; and hot water freezes faster than cold.

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  • The Year in Art Crime

    Art is robust. We’ve spent at least the last century declaring it dead and yet here it is, making a lot of money, alienating the masses, wearing black and scowling. Perhaps, then, it is a matter of strategy. Art can’t be killed by a manifesto, or the undermining of the fetishised object: its death may, just maybe, be brought about by small gestures. This is a feeble conceit, but we go to print in a few hours and as I write this I am lying on my back on a bloodstained leather recliner and a large, hairy man is tattooing the words ‘I HAVE GIVEN UP’ across my forehead. So, without further ado, I present to you a short list of tiny chinks in the very sturdy armour of cultural hegemony, a few triumphant acts of iconoclasm in the service of a revolution no one is really interested in.

    • In February, Máximo Caminero, a Florida artist, destroyed a painted Ai Weiwei vase (valued at $1 million) on display at the Pérez Art Museum Miami. Caminero said the vandalism was an act of protest against the museum’s neglect of local artists in favour of blockbuster names. Behind the installation of vases was a set of three photographs depicting Weiwei holding and then dropping a Ming-dynasty vase. Caminero said any symbolism was unintended.

    • Also in February, a cleaner at the Flip Project Space in southern Italy accidentally threw away a Sala Murat piece. Security guards noticed several items were missing from the installation, which was comprised of pieces of newspaper and cookie-cutters, and reported to gallery administration. BBC News quoted the city’s marketing commissioner as saying, “It’s clear the cleaning person did not realise she had thrown away two works and their value. But this is all about the artists who have been able to better interpret the meaning of contemporary art, which is to interact with the environment… In any case, the insurance will cover the damages caused.”

    • On 9 March, criminal charges were filed against El Salvadoran artist Víctor “Crack” Rodríguez for a performance piece in which he is seen eating a ballot paper. No subsequent information about the charges has been published since late March, but if Rodríguez is convicted, he could face up to six years in jail.

    • A 61-year-old man in Kingscliff, Australia led police on a 300 m chase on a toy scooter after spray-painting the words “Dumb Cops” and “Kingy Boyz Rule”, as well as other illegible slogans, on the local police station. The man managed to injure two police officers during the altercation. A police representative was quoted as saying, “It’s not our usual type of graffiti suspect, at that age.”

    • The Louvre’s Tuileries Garden is infested with rats. Administrators blamed the infestation on litter left by picnicking tourists. Poison has been left in the Garden since July to try to combat the rodent problem, but rat sympathisers have been, for months, removing it.

    • In August, Canadian performance artist Istvan Kantor smeared his own blood on the walls of the Whitney Museum where a Jeff Koons retrospective was taking place. The museum was promptly closed for cleaning and Kantor sent to a psychiatric institution for evaluation. Kantor, who is a member of the Neoist movement, has engaged in interventionist performance pieces since the 1970s. In 2004, he threw a vial of his blood at a Paul McCarthy sculpture in Berlin.

    • In September, a nine-foot-tall statue of a bright-red-skinned, particularly well endowed Satan posed in a devil-horn salute was, ahem, erected in a park in Vancouver. The statue, which was visible from the main commuter line of Vancouver’s SkyTrain, was promptly removed as it was “not officially commissioned by the city”. As yet, no one has taken responsibility for the piece.

    • A Utah man charged with vandalising a Banksy was last month ordered to pay a US$13,000 fine or face jail time. The Banksy murals, which were painted illegally on private property in 2010, were encased in Plexiglas by the city to preserve them. The money is intended to cover the cost of restoring the paintings, and to replace the Plexiglas.

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  • About the Author ()

    Salient is a magazine. Salient is a website. Salient is an institution founded in 1938 to cater to the whim and fancy of students of Victoria University. We are partly funded by VUWSA and partly by gold bullion that was discovered under a pile of old Salients from the 40's. Salient welcomes your participation in debate on all the issues that we present to you, and if you're a student of Victoria University then you're more than welcome to drop in and have tea and scones with the contributors of this little rag in our little hideaway that overlooks Wellington.

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