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May 11, 2015 | by  | in Māori Matters |
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Hei whakaarotanga mō koutou

Koinei tētehi rārangi (nāku ētehi mea i whakakore) nā Peggy McIntosh i tuhi e pā ana ki te mana Pākehā (white privilege). Pānui mai, whakaaro mai. Kua miramiratia ngā kōrero whai hira ki au.

1. If I should need to move, I can be pretty sure of renting or purchasing housing in an area which I can afford and in which I would want to live.

2. I can be pretty sure that my neighbours in such a location will be neutral or pleasant to me.

3. I can go shopping alone most of the time, pretty well assured that I will not be followed or harassed.

4. I can turn on the television or open to the front page of the paper and see people of my race widely represented.

5. When I am told about our national heritage or about “civilization,” I am shown that people of my colour made it what it is.

6. I can go into a music shop and count on finding the music of my race
represented, into a supermarket and find the staple foods which fit with my
cultural traditions, into a hairdresser’s shop and find someone who can cut my hair.

7. Whether I use cheque, credit card, or cash, I can count on my skin colour not to work against the appearance of financial reliability.

8. I can swear, or dress in second hand clothes, or not answer letters, without having people attribute these choices to the bad morals, the poverty, or the illiteracy of my race.

9. I can speak in public to a powerful male group without putting my race on trial.

10. I am never asked to speak for all the people of my racial group.

11. I can remain oblivious of the language and customs of persons of colour who constitute the world’s majority without feeling in my culture any penalty for such oblivion.

12. I can criticise our government and talk about how much I fear its policies and behaviour without being seen as a cultural outsider.

13. I can take a job with an affirmative action employer without having co-workers on the job suspect that I got it because of race.

14. I can be sure that if I need legal or medical help, my race will not work against me.

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Editor's Pick

Ten things I wish my friends knew about being Māori

: 1). I wish my friends knew that when they ask me what “percentage” of Māori I am—half, quarter, or eighth—they make me feel like a human pie chart. I don’t know how people can ask this so nonchalantly, but they do. So I want to let you know: this is a very threatening