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May 11, 2015 | by  | in News |
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Warning: Students May be Exposed to Some Fun This Year

Victoria’s Capping Revue could be revived in time for this year’s November graduation, if VUWSA Clubs and Activities Officer Rory McNamara has his way.

Named for its traditional “capping week” performances during graduation, the Capping Revue is a student performance comprised of comedy sketches, music and dance.

Founded in 1921, the show ran until the mid-1990’s when it mysteriously vanished due to a lack of funding (perhaps because shows were held in the swanky Opera House).

The 1939 event, entitled “Cappicade”, boasted “Gorgeous Ballets, Sparkling, Witty Dialogue” and “Good Clean College Fun.”

Otago University’s Capping Show has survived since 1894, and according to OUSA is the world’s longest continually-running capping show, due to overseas universities stopping their performances during WW1 and WWII.

OUSA describes their event, which sells out every year, as “guaranteed to make you make you LOL, wince with awkwardness, cringe with offense and make you tell everyone you know how awesome it was.”

McNamara is keen to re-introduce the show. “It is a really cool thing and also a great way to use the Memorial Theatre.”

He claims the show is also a way for students to leave university with funny memories and a great way to encourage student-produced theatre.

McNamara said he has the support of Campus Services Associate Director Rainsforth Dix, and the University is happy to get behind the event.

If it goes ahead, the Capping Revue would be funded by VUWSA Clubs and ticket sales. McNamara expects costs would be minimal and “not a significant barrier” to hosting the event.

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