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Issue 19, 2015

Women

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News

  • Airing Victoria’s laundry

  • John Campbell, a blow for gender equality?

  • A Grand Ol’ Party: A Review

  • Features

  • Sparrow

    The Golden Speculum

    For someone who was at the forefront of so many women’s rights issues, Dame Margaret Sparrow was decidedly normal and unassuming

    by

  • intersectional

    There’s no such thing as “post-racial feminism”

    Alongside being Māori I am also a feminist, and key to that, an intersectional one

    by

  • christina

    Girls Don’t Like Sleep, Girls Like Coffee and Diarrhea

    Since the dawn of womankind, humanity has been continually confronted by unknowable questions: Is there a God? What is true happiness? Why are we here? Just what happened in the last episode of Lost?

    by

  • allies

    Allies vs. Axis

    You’re a dude and you’re well-intentioned and you want to distinguish yourself from the innumerable fuckbois out there, so you give yourself a new moniker: ally

    by

  • faq

    Feminist FAQs

    What is Feminism? Feminism has several different interpretations and means different things to different people. But in short, feminism is a movement/ideology that recognises that there is a gender imbalance within our society which negatively affects all genders, not just women. But if feminism wants to help more than just women, why is it called […]

    by

  • wahine

    Wāhine ō te Mana Māori

    My upbringing immersed in my māoritanga has, nevertheless, been incredibly influential on who I am as a feminist

    by

  • clothing

    Stolen saris and “white girl” hair

    In theory, we can wear anything we like in today’s world, but in reality, we are socialised to dress a certain way according to our gender, race, sexual orientation and body size (in this article, I focus on how society’s attitudes to clothing affects women through an intersectional feminist lens). In nineteenth-century Western society, it […]

    by

  • fandom

    Feminist Fandom

    In February the Centre for the Study of Women in Television and Film found that only 12 per cent of clearly identifiable protagonists in film and television were women, and that women made up only 30 per cent of all speaking characters. Unfortunately the same trends are found on and off the camera, and representation […]

    by

  • Sparrow

    The Golden Speculum

    For someone who was at the forefront of so many women’s rights issues, Dame Margaret Sparrow was decidedly normal and unassuming

    by

  • intersectional

    There’s no such thing as “post-racial feminism”

    Alongside being Māori I am also a feminist, and key to that, an intersectional one

    by

  • christina

    Girls Don’t Like Sleep, Girls Like Coffee and Diarrhea

    Since the dawn of womankind, humanity has been continually confronted by unknowable questions: Is there a God? What is true happiness? Why are we here? Just what happened in the last episode of Lost?

    by

  • allies

    Allies vs. Axis

    You’re a dude and you’re well-intentioned and you want to distinguish yourself from the innumerable fuckbois out there, so you give yourself a new moniker: ally

    by

  • faq

    Feminist FAQs

    What is Feminism? Feminism has several different interpretations and means different things to different people. But in short, feminism is a movement/ideology that recognises that there is a gender imbalance within our society which negatively affects all genders, not just women. But if feminism wants to help more than just women, why is it called […]

    by

  • wahine

    Wāhine ō te Mana Māori

    My upbringing immersed in my māoritanga has, nevertheless, been incredibly influential on who I am as a feminist

    by

  • clothing

    Stolen saris and “white girl” hair

    In theory, we can wear anything we like in today’s world, but in reality, we are socialised to dress a certain way according to our gender, race, sexual orientation and body size (in this article, I focus on how society’s attitudes to clothing affects women through an intersectional feminist lens). In nineteenth-century Western society, it […]

    by

  • fandom

    Feminist Fandom

    In February the Centre for the Study of Women in Television and Film found that only 12 per cent of clearly identifiable protagonists in film and television were women, and that women made up only 30 per cent of all speaking characters. Unfortunately the same trends are found on and off the camera, and representation […]

    by

  • Arts and Science

  • On Joan Didion

    Moments of revelation are a common phenomenon; you meet your future significant other, you see people you love come and go, you watch milestones unfold, and each moment seems to hang in a suspend state of permanence and transience.

    The same such revelatory moment occurred when I first read Joan Didion’s work.

    I remember lying in the lounge of my last flat, strewn across an incredibly uncomfortable couch, of which the bottom was falling out and our attempts to rebuild the base using old cushions and pillows had only marginally saved it from complete disaster. I had issued several books from the public library; I was unemployed, or imminently so, and had decided to undergo a comprehensive range of reading to circumvent the inevitable employment-related depression.

    I have probably picked up the name Joan Didion as an important author to read from a writer friend, or through Gilmore Girls (my unashamed source of many pop/high cultural knowledge). I found her in the city library and selected my favourite of her covers. It was an old hardback and the plastic that had been wrapped around the dust jacket had yellowed with age. It was a 1970s cover: Play It as It Lays: A Novel by Joan Didion, the front cover read. The title was positioned towards the top, and was set against a pink background with a sunburst. The rest of the cover had a white background with a black, almost geometric, snake coiled into a spiral in the middle of the cover.

    As I lay on the couch, with the plastic cover creaking between my fingers, the old smell of library books filling my nostrils, I felt an immense shift within. I read the story of a floating woman, whose life of ornament had severed her realities between how she existed as a person, and within her mind. The descriptions of affairs, of abortions, and of suicide, were gripping and unsettling. The story traces the mental collapse of the central character, which was a powerful thing to read as I faced my own version of a collapse.

    There seemed to be a cellular change, and I knew I had to have more. I tracked down her collection of essays Slouching Towards Bethlehem; after a simple peek into the collection resulted in reading a whole essay, I decided, for whatever reason, to ration it. I didn’t want to destroy the sensation of having read her different works for the first time—I didn’t want to rush my first time, any of them. I still haven’t finished this collection.

    Joan Didion is a novelist, memoirist, scriptwriter, and essayist. Her writing is razor precise and compact. Her writing has been described to possess “Unsentimental precision and compactness”. Taking her lessons from writers such as Ernest Hemingway and Henry James, in their sparse and meticulous use of language, she saw the importance of the sentence.

    She started her career writing for Vogue in the 1950s, the position a prize for an essay competition in her final year of university. The shift from university to Vogue was “so profoundly unnatural”; however, she quickly became senior feature editor. While there, she wrote her first novel Run River, her first collection of essays, her second novel, and then met her husband, and moved to California.

    Joan Didion, however, is one of those writers. I’m pained by the cliché; she has probably inspired most writers to be writers. Despite this, I remain unable to find a reason to eschew my adoration. Quotes from her work fill pages upon pages of Tumblr, and so, too, do images of her—she has a cultish following.

    This year saw Joan Didion become the face for French fashion brand Celine. In her usual black over-sized glasses, and chic bob, Didion seems to embody effortless elegance as well as intelligence. But as critics lampoon her for succumbing to the advertising machine, I consider it a testament to her particular brand of womanhood.

    As an author she cultivated her image. Her covers often featured her picture; often she was in some very Californian car, or smoking, or wearing very large, black sunglasses. Images are part and parcel with her sense of womanhood, something that was very settling to learn from such a wise and inspiring author. Sartorial precision is exacted as she details her essentials when packing, in an essay in her collection The White Album—a collection for which I have just won an auction online.

    Joan Didion is essential reading for everyone in early adult life, and her importance doesn’t diminish as you age. A harrowing two-part series of memoirs outline the loss of both her husband, and then her daughter. Her observations are eternally universal, and profound in their lack of sentimentality. Rather it’s her earnest and honest emotional realities that slip into your core.

    Joan Didion’s Bangers

    Slouching Towards Bethlehem (1968)

    Play It as It Lays (1970)

    The Year of Magical Thinking (2005)

    by

  • Vaginal Arts

    Art is important and vaginas are important. Here are three important vaginal art pieces that say as much about contemporary art as they do about society:

    1. Casey JenkinsCasting Off My Womb

    This Australian artist spent a month in an art gallery knitting from wool stored in her vaginal tunnel. After receiving overwhelming internet backlash, she responded by saying that “Commentators seem to be genuinely outraged that I would dare to do something that they view as strange and repulsive with my body without displaying shame. Women putting themselves forward in any capacity in the world is frowned upon, and for a woman to put herself forward in a way that is not designed to be attractive or pleasing is downright seditious.” I for one think that not only is the piece clever feminist commentary, but that the resulting woollen “scarf” holds in itself high in artistic merit. Impossible to ever exactly replicate again, the period-blood patterned wool is a completely original and organic creation that is better to look at than most things in galleries these days.

    1. Rokudenashi-ko a.k.a Megumi IgarashiPussy Boat

    This Japanese artist made her vagina open source by publishing its 3D data online. She also used the data to 3D-print her own canoe, and for these activities she has spent time in jail on obscenity charges. On her charges she says, “the fact that I was arrested for this at all shows that Japan is still very backwards about women’s sexual expression, that it is not acknowledged at all except as something for men’s pleasure”; and on her work, “the vagina is ridiculed. It’s lusted after. Men don’t see women as equalsto them, women are just vaginas. Then they call my vagina-themed work ‘obscene’, and judge me according to laws written by and for men.” She is currently on trial where she faces up to two years in prison and a fine of up to ¥2.5m. You can help support her by visiting her store (http://ganka.buyshop.jp/) where she sells products such as glow in the dark vagina characters.

    1. Deborah de RobertisMirror of Origin

    This Luxembourgian artist sat in front of Gustave Courbet’s The Origin of the World, spread her legs apart and displayed her own vagina to cheers, applause, and disgruntled security staff. Courbet’s painting itself was, and still is, controversial. It shattered homogenous European painting tradition by actually including pubic hair, a symbol of sexual power. As John Berger writes, “the woman’s sexual passion needs to be minimised so that the spectator may feel that he has the monopoly of such passion. Women are there to feed an appetite, not to have any of their own.” De Robertis builds on top of this conversation, unflinchingly displaying herself to all spectatorsher gaze is not welcoming or coy like that of the classical female nude, but daringly confrontational.

    by

  • How not to look like a first year

    Bartending has ruined numerous things for me*, including but not limited to my social life, Tinder dates, the illusion that two-for-one cocktails will actually get you drunk, and everything I was wearing the time I spilt 135 mL of flaming Chartreuse down myself.

    I am, however, enabled prime observational opportunity of the extremities of human behaviour, from the painfully sober side of the bar. I have been privy to the mating rituals of middle-aged couples grinding on each other against bar stools, have witnessed drunk first year girls solicit kebabs from complete strangers, and have deflected the slurred seductive attempts of every straight male to pass the threshold. Tip me and perhaps I’ll endure your mindless rambling for an extra 30 seconds, but no, sweetheart, despite your claim that you have lost your number, you cannot have mine. 

    I have also adapted the acute ability to spot freshers from 800 metres away. My spidey senses begin to tingle ferociously when a pack of first years stumbles down Forrester’s Lane, preempting the cacophony of screeches and tequila shot requests destined to erupt upon their arrival. 

    How to disguise the fact that you live in a hall:

    1. Don’t wear white sandals to town (or in any context whatsoever). For more advice see my previous column “White Sandal Girl”. 
    1. Avoid shrieking. Please, for the love of God, do not shriek. 
    1. If you own one of those atrocious fold-over skorts that looks like a fancy napkin, ritualistically burn it.
    1. Playsuits. Specifically those ghastly, shapeless ones with the scalloped shorts and stupid little pompoms. They are so incredibly frumpy and unflattering. On everyone. 
    1. T-shirt dresses. Honestly, ew. Love yourselves. 
    1. If you’re going to snog strangers, by all means go wild, but be sure to remove the tell-tale lipstick smudges from around your mouth (and nose). Not a gr8 look. (As someone who has had to taxi her flatmate from home to the bathroom of Edison’s with emergency makeup supplies to avoid this scenario, stay woke.)

    __________

    *Disclaimer: I am however now immune to the eternal question “Is he hot or is it because he’s a bartender?” He is merely the supplier of alcohol. The allure is gone. (Unless aforementioned alcohol is free, in which case he is a fabulous human being and here is my number, looking forward to never returning your calls or to this bar.) 

    by

  • The Falling

    ★★★★½

    The Falling (Director, Carol Morley) is set in a strict all-girl’s school in the 1960s and begins by following the intense bond between Abbie (Florence Pugh) and Lydia (Game of Thrones’ Maisie Williams). Abbie, with her long, blonde hair and angelic face, is uniquely compelling—she loves poetry, established the school’s Alternative Orchestra and generally moves gently through the world. In contrast, Lydia is rebellious and abrasive—clinging to Abbie’s friendship in light of her home environment, which includes a cold, agoraphobic mother and a brother not beyond committing incest. Spoiler alert: Abbie keeps fainting and then dies, and the girls at the school are subsequently beset by spells of dizziness and brief unconsciousness.

    I LOVED this movie. But I’ll continue this review with the proviso that, despite my high rating, it won’t be for everyone—as evidenced by the attendant who gave me my ticket whilst simultaneously expressing her distaste for it. I will admit that some of the dialogue is lacking in subtlety. Similarly, the ending, while it technically made sense, didn’t feel like it fit that cohesively with the whole.  However, there was SO much to redeem The Falling. Abbie and Lydia were perfectly cast and the female friendships—between teenage girls, middle-aged women, and young and older women—were incredibly refreshing to see. Abbie and Lydia’s friendship reminded me so much of being at an all-girls school as a teenager—the way you would fall in love with and idealise other girls, or being such close friends with a girl you would lie in each other’s arms and have them stroke your head in a completely non-sexual, beautifully platonic way. Similarly, the ritualistic nature of the girls’ interactions and the choreography of their “falls”, while being wonderfully melodramatic, reminded me of my pre-teen Wicca phase. It was kind of a magical time, and the movie captures this beautifully. Similarly, the music and dramatic intensity of the girls’ fainting spells were really effective, and I loved the tableaux created by Morley of the school grounds—gnarled trees and rain on water, contrasted with the austere interior of the school and the headmistress, constantly smoking cigarettes, their crackling forming part of the aural terrain of the film.

    I would highly recommend this film. The Falling was something completely different, and an example of the rich diversity we have the potential to experience when a director chooses not to utilise entrenched (read: totally overdone) tropes, character types and narratives.

    by

  • Terminator Genisys

    ★★

    I’ve learned from this film that nothing matters. Everything is inconsequential. From the beginning of the film to the end, nothing of real consequence happened. This isn’t a spoiler, as it made the mistake of revealing “crucial” plot points in its own marketing, some of which were bigger than others (*cough* Robo-John Connor *cough*). The movie tries to bill itself as a rewriting of the series, a “what-if” scenario of the first film. Instead it plays out like a carefully constructed and spliced fan edit of Terminator 1 and 2, characters and all, with the end result appearing not unlike an episode of How It Should Have Ended. It also became really convoluted. As convoluted as time travel logic is in any film, the exposition and jokes made at both the concept and designated protagonist Kyle Reese’s expense flew right over my head, and after a while I started wishing for Schwarzenegger to return to brandishing his catchphrases and mannerisms that the people attached to this film are obligated to show.

    Without sounding like a devotee to the first two films, why they worked (and still do) was that although they were structured as long chase scenes, these were motivated and had significant stakes in them due to the nature of the antagonists: nigh-indestructible and terrifying robotic assailants that made triumph over them seem futile. They were a necessity to progress the actions and development of the characters, and, oddly enough for a film, make us care about them and want them to succeed. In Genisys, the action is meaningless and without investment, as you’re simply waiting to get to the inevitable fight at the end, turning Reese into an unintentional audience surrogate because of his consistently tired facial expressions. There is little investment if the end goal is to stop the villainous Skynet system from ever existing when the same thing was attempted on film in 1991, and if anyone knows the ways of Hollywood’s non-existent “hands off the priceless Ming vase” policy, to sum up, this will not be the last attempt made.

    by

  • Five Steps to Becoming an Indie Developer

    So, you like video games. Good for you, so do millions of others. The gaming industry is a major juggernaut in the entertainment business these days, so it’s only natural that everyone wants a slice of the pie.  

    Normally, ordinary saps like yourself get in on the action by recording themselves looking silly while playing, but that’s for people with actual comedic talent. You want to feel empowered, you want to create, and you want to be a true artist of the interactive medium! “But wait!” I hear you screaming from your dingy little apartment, “Games are expensive and I don’t have money, plus I’ve never typed a line of code in my life!” Well, never fear! Even with your lack of a budget or any discernible skill, it’s no problem at all; just follow these five easy steps and you’ll be kickin’ ass, takin’ names and makin’ great games in no time.

    1. Choose a genre

    Like all forms of entertainment, the gaming public likes to follow trends; certain genres will become really popular at any one time. You’ll definitely want to keep up with these trends, because otherwise anything you make simply won’t get noticed! Open-world survival games are super in-vogue right now, and even though they can be incredibly tricky to master, anyone can make one, as you’ll see below.

    2. Get an engine and some assets

    The best developers out there tend to create their own engines to power their games and the assets to fill them with content, but that unfortunately takes actual effort. Don’t worry though, the Unity engine is here to save you! Unity is super easy to use and there’s plenty of tutorials out there to help you out. There’s even a store where you can buy and download assets to put in your game, because you know you can’t make anything vaguely resembling an original ideahundreds of hard-working folks have done it all for you, and by using their stuff, you’re supporting independent developers such as yourself!

    3. Make your game

    As I said above, just follow the tutorials, stick to all the assets you bought and you’ll be fine. Don’t worry about any bugsthey’re inherent to the engine and someone else will fix it eventually. Besides, glitches are funny as hell! Oh, and if you’re making a survival game, don’t forget the crafting system.

    4. Put your game on Steam

    Once you’ve finished something that looks pretty much playable, it’s time to rake in the big bucks! Getting a game on Steam used to be super hard, since they used to hire curators that sorted through all the games and made sure they were of decent quality. Now that they’ve ditched them all and replaced them with Greenlight, you’re a shoo-in to get on the Steam storefront. Just pay Valve $100 to become a certified developer, put up some gameplay footage you recorded with the free version of Fraps and bribe voters with free keys for your game; that’ll reel them in. Once your game’s been approved, charge the punters $10 for your masterpiece and watch the money roll in. Oh, and don’t forget to say the game’s in Early Access if it’s a little (read: very) unpolished.

    5. Revel in the adulation

    It feels good to be an indie dev, doesn’t it? Your game is fucking awesome and you know it! Hell, some bastards actually paid their hard earned money for something you made in just a few hours! Who cares if they ask for a refund, their money is yours now! Even if that fat bastard Jim Sterling calls your game a piece of shit on YouTube, he used game footage that belongs to you! That gives you all the rights to hit him with a copyright takedown notice, so his criticism is deleted from the internet forever! Nothing can stop you now, because you’re an indie game developer!

    Once you’ve followed these steps, you’ll be well on your way to being the best damn game developer the world has ever seen, with the money and the adulation to back it up! Go out there and make ol’ Cameron proud!

    DISCLAIMER: Salient and the author of this article take no responsibility for any losses or personal injury to one’s ego arising from the use of this guide, including, but not limited to, DDoS attacks, death threats on Twitter, and legitimate negative criticism. Any resemblance to actual thought processes of shitty indie developers is both purely coincidental and totally intentional (seriously, people have actually done these things). This article is a work of satire and if you haven’t realised that by now, may God have mercy on your soul.

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  • Dr. Dre—Compton

    ★★★★½

    Dre is finally back in the game. After 16 agonising years of waiting for the follow-up to 1999’s classic 2001, Dr. Dre has finally dropped Compton as a surprise release. Compton is inspired by the upcoming film Straight Outta Compton, which of course depicts the story of NWA. As there seems to currently be a lot of retrospect and analysis being applied to NWA and the rap movement around the late 1980s through to the 1990s, Dre too applies this sentiment of retrospection to Compton, and this forms the main theme of the record.

    A heap of collaborators pop up on Compton—legends of old and new school rap, as well as a gaggle of underground rappers Dre has taken under his wing. Some of these rappers pull through in a big way—King Mez’s star turn on the opening “Talk About It” and Jon Connor’s track “One Shot One Kill” spring to mind—and this really adds to the quality of the album.

    There’s a wee bit of controversy around Eminem’s verse on “Medicine Man”, but despite this, Dre’s production, and perhaps just his presence in general, brings out what could be one of the best Eminem verses in recent memory. This too applies to Snoop Dogg, who seems to be rapping with more tenacity and urgency than in recent times, especially considering the ill-fated Snoop Lion project of 2013. Kendrick Lamar’s presence on Compton cannot be understated, his verse on “Genocide” is an early highlight of the album, whilst Kendrick’s rapping style seems to transcend into Dre’s own rapping on this album, which will perhaps fuel rumours that Kendrick is ghostwriting for Dre. Dre himself comes up with a solo gem to finish the album in the form of “Talking To My Diary”. The track brings back the vintage G-Funk production that Dre became renowned for and it is flawless. Dre’s rap on this track is also super, featuring a ton references to his NWA days—particularly to his deceased friend, Eazy-E.

    I applaud Dre for releasing another album, given that he really didn’t have to. Compton doesn’t diminish Dre’s discography, but acts as a stellar grand finale to one of the best three-album runs in the history of hip-hop music. Dre’s influence on the hip-hop/rap genre is immeasurable, and it’s quite a relief that he’s pulled through with Compton: a superb send-off from one of rap’s greatest.

    by

  • Errbody got beef with Drake

    In my eyes Drake can do no wrong. I don’t care how arrogant people claim he is, or how disconnected he is from the hardships that so many great rappers have faced; I will always see the goofy Nickelodeon alum through rose tinted glasses.

    But not everyone has been so favourable. In case you live under a rock, Drake has been at the centre of some serious beef these past few weeks. Said beef that got me thinking about all of the other catfights that our seemingly sweeter-than-honey Drizzy has gotten himself into over the years. Like a bad boyfriend you keep running back to, all it takes is a flash of his Hollywood smile to have me weak at the knees all over again. So in an effort to properly establish where we stand, I decided to take a trip down memory lane and revisit some of Drizzy’s very best battles.

    Pusha T, May 2012

    Who even is Pusha T these days? Good question. And this beef sure as hell didn’t do his B-grade career any favours. Like all great rap wars, this drama was born out of a song Pusha released dissing Drake for signing with Lil Wayne’s label Cash Money. Like two parents fighting over custody, Drake was merely a pawn in a much bigger issue between T and Weezy. Pusha never stood a chance. Moral of the storynever pick fights with rappers whose mentors are 10,000 times more successful than you are.

    Drake: 1
    Haterz: 0

    Kanye West, July 2009

    A couple of passive-aggressive teenage girls these two were. It all began when Kanye directed Drake’s first video back in ‘09 and it was a royal fuck up. Kanye then bailed and left Drake to clean up the mess. They stole each other’s girls, dissed each other in songs, and sent many a Twitter burn. Then, in August 2013, the rap music gods performed some voodoo magic and they somehow patched up the friendship. It was almost too easy. Was the four-year drama nothing more than an extravagant PR stunt? We common folk will never know. I’m calling this one a draw.

    Drake: 1
    Haterz: 0

    Kendrick Lamar, early 2013

    With a history more complex than a Home & Away love triangle, I’m not even gonna bother with these two. Where Kendrick released a politically loaded album that will be cherished for years to come, Drake continued to throw stones like a kid in the playground. One point to The Haterz.

    Drake: 1
    Haterz: 1

    Childish Gambino, July 2014

    Ahhhh, Childish Gambino. The sexiest, most swoon-worthy rapper of them all (ahem, Magic Mike XXL). Mid-2014 this small fry decided he was ready to play with the big kids and hung Drake out to dry in an interview, saying, “Nah, I ain’t Drake. I sing better. I do better.” As if that wasn’t enough, he came back for round two in December with what might just be the sassiest backhanded compliment of 2014: “I don’t hate Drake at all. I really like Drake, if not for no other reason than he makes me better… I think he’s a really good writer and rapper. Right now, I think I’m better than him.” And that my friends, is how you burn in style.

    Drake: 1
    Haterz: 2

    Meek Mill, July 2015

    The beef that tipped me over the edge. Here goes. A few weeks back, Drake made headlines over a catfight that more closely resembles an episode of Real Housewives. Nicki’s current boo (and opening act for her Pinkprint Tour), Meek Mill, started calling Drake out on Twitter. Yip, he pulled the d-bag keyboard warrior move saying, “Stop comparing Drake to me too… he don’t write his own raps!” But Meek fucked up. The so-called ghostwriters were in fact co-writers who were properly credited. So what did Drake do? He dropped not one, but two songs on Soundcloud, calling Meek out. I think it’s safe to say Meek killed the rap battle with his embarrassingly bad rebuttal “Wanna Know”. Drake’s smooth moves win.

    Drake: 2
    Haterz: 2

    Well, that ended in a goddamn draw and I have wasted hours of my life that I’ll never get back, so I’ll finish with thisignorance is bliss. If you can look past my reality TV obsession, then I can surely turn a blind eye to the many verbal wars you’re waging, and we can all live happily ever after in a diamond encrusted mansion. The end.

    The essential Drake vs. The Haterz playlist

    1. Drake“Used To”
    2. Dr. Dre feat. Kendrick Lamar, Justus & Anderson. Paak“Deep Water”
    3. Drake“Charged Up”
    4. Meek Mill“Wanna Know”
    5. Drake“Back to Back”
    6. Nick Minaj feat. Drake and Chris Brown“Only”
    7. Drake“No New Friends”
    8. Childish Gambino“Sober”
    9. Drake“Energy”
    10. Dr. Dre feat. King Mez, Marsha Ambrosius & Kendrick Lamar“Darkside/Gone”

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  • About the Author ()

    Salient is a magazine. Salient is a website. Salient is an institution founded in 1938 to cater to the whim and fancy of students of Victoria University. We are partly funded by VUWSA and partly by gold bullion that was discovered under a pile of old Salients from the 40's. Salient welcomes your participation in debate on all the issues that we present to you, and if you're a student of Victoria University then you're more than welcome to drop in and have tea and scones with the contributors of this little rag in our little hideaway that overlooks Wellington.

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    Editor's Pick

    Ten things I wish my friends knew about being Māori

    : 1). I wish my friends knew that when they ask me what “percentage” of Māori I am—half, quarter, or eighth—they make me feel like a human pie chart. I don’t know how people can ask this so nonchalantly, but they do. So I want to let you know: this is a very threatening