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Issue 24, 2015

Fuck the Establishment

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News

  • Facebook upset over fee rises

  • No room for philosophy icon

  • Vic marketers: “Did we make the right choice?”

  • Eye On Exec: “Do we care about what’s happening in Palestine?”

  • NZUSA saga refuses to die

  • This is literary so great

  • Features

  • surveillance

    Hack Like Nobody’s Watching

    Ever since intelligence community martyr and recent Twitter user Edward Snowden leaked classified documents from the NSA, we’ve suddenly become aware of the extent to which intelligence agencies can keep tabs on all of our online actions.

    by

  • ian curtis

    The Ian Curtis Memorial Wall, Wallace Street: An Investigation

    When we moved to Wellington, we lived in a small hovel on Wallace Street in Mount Cook. Leaving our home, we would wander down to the Adelaide Road Countdown to buy mince, passing the series of murals on western Wallace Street. As we crested the hill, we’d come upon a large blue and black mural. […]

    by

  • baby boomers

    Why I Hate Baby Boomers

    My parents were in town the other day and I casually mentioned over dinner that I really hate Baby Boomers. They digested their curries and eyed me up with annoyance, mentally stowing away yet another reason to disinherit me. All those chocolate bars I stole from my older brother when we were kids, after which […]

    by

  • forger

    Foibles of a Foxton Forger

    CF Goldie, or Karl Sim, died in 2013 as New Zealand’s only convicted art forger.

    by

  • cops

    Coppers Become Croppers

    Our current justice system, from head to toe, branch to branch, isn’t about justice or fairness or nobility or bravery or progression; it’s about maintaining order.

    by

  • teach

    Word Up, Student Teachers!

    “No school system can claim to be just which is organised in such a way as to favour children who have been socialised in one, rather than another part of the social structure of the community that nourishes them.”

    by

  • fingers

    Ten Fingers’ Worth

    I read books, not cards or palms. But I reckon I can see your life written across your hands. Calloused skin and sinewy veins, nails blunted and cuticles in tatters, knuckles ashy and split.  – SPONSORED – Dermatological milestones, ten fingers worth of 30 years.   If given a second chance I doubt you’d go […]

    by

  • surveillance

    Hack Like Nobody’s Watching

    Ever since intelligence community martyr and recent Twitter user Edward Snowden leaked classified documents from the NSA, we’ve suddenly become aware of the extent to which intelligence agencies can keep tabs on all of our online actions.

    by

  • ian curtis

    The Ian Curtis Memorial Wall, Wallace Street: An Investigation

    When we moved to Wellington, we lived in a small hovel on Wallace Street in Mount Cook. Leaving our home, we would wander down to the Adelaide Road Countdown to buy mince, passing the series of murals on western Wallace Street. As we crested the hill, we’d come upon a large blue and black mural. […]

    by

  • baby boomers

    Why I Hate Baby Boomers

    My parents were in town the other day and I casually mentioned over dinner that I really hate Baby Boomers. They digested their curries and eyed me up with annoyance, mentally stowing away yet another reason to disinherit me. All those chocolate bars I stole from my older brother when we were kids, after which […]

    by

  • forger

    Foibles of a Foxton Forger

    CF Goldie, or Karl Sim, died in 2013 as New Zealand’s only convicted art forger.

    by

  • cops

    Coppers Become Croppers

    Our current justice system, from head to toe, branch to branch, isn’t about justice or fairness or nobility or bravery or progression; it’s about maintaining order.

    by

  • teach

    Word Up, Student Teachers!

    “No school system can claim to be just which is organised in such a way as to favour children who have been socialised in one, rather than another part of the social structure of the community that nourishes them.”

    by

  • fingers

    Ten Fingers’ Worth

    I read books, not cards or palms. But I reckon I can see your life written across your hands. Calloused skin and sinewy veins, nails blunted and cuticles in tatters, knuckles ashy and split.  – SPONSORED – Dermatological milestones, ten fingers worth of 30 years.   If given a second chance I doubt you’d go […]

    by

  • Arts and Science

  • Vic Architecture students go to Auckland for free drinks

    Over the weekend of 25–26 September, 28 Vic students of the fine art that is architecture traversed up to Auckland to compete in a frantic 24-hour design competition run by SANNZ, the Student Architecture Network of New Zealand. As part of Auckland Architecture Week, the event was set to be “24 hours of relentless camaraderie and rivalry”, with the University of Auckland hosting students from all four schools of architecture across the country. Student teams of 46 had just 24 hours to come up with a design for a surprise brief in competition for glory, cash and a pineapple-shaped trophy—3D printed of course.

    FRIDAY

    The competition began in the afternoon with a series of workshops led by tutors and architects. Held in the student bar, creativity was generously plied with flowing alcohol and food. After varying degrees of productivity, a walking bus took students to the Auckland Museum, where further bar-side inspiration took place at a Pecha Kucha night where architects, artists, curators and students shared an impressively diverse range of ideas. For those who had inadvertently consumed a bottle of wine far, far too quickly, it was also a great chance for a tactical vomit in some very nice toilets.

    At 10.30pm the brief was finally revealed—a meteor strike to the moon has increased the Auckland tides by 4 metres in height; the challenge was now to design for the new subaquatic waterfront. It was also revealed that groups had to have a mix of students from at least two architecture schools, and while some groups separated for the night to sleep, others brainstormed into the night. Vic students largely stuck together, though one brave student ventured into a four-strong Auckland team alone but to largely incompatible results, beginning with their rejected suggestion of “Labia Party” as team name.  

    SATURDAY

    A painful 8am start saw another surprise thrown at the students—a Wheel of Fortune to determine the type of medium that groups would present in. There were four possible categories: found image, moving image, performance art, and one to one. With a 3.30pm deadline, groups quickly spun the wheel to cries of both delight and horror, and quickly got to work. Creative output was varied, with some groups already having established the brunt of their concept the night before, while other students spent much of their time completely lost and locked inside the labyrinth of stairwells and corridors of the ridiculous Auckland campus. The hours quickly slipped away for the teams as the afternoon deadline loomed, with drawing, debating, collaging, filming and collaborating happening at frenzied paces unseen in the usual studio environment.  

    After the deadline passed, sighing, crying and high-fiving teams presented their work with a panel of esteemed judges also in the audience. The collective volume of work had an intensity that only such a quick-fire competition could produce, with the audience complicit in the garishness that took the stage. Oyster invasions, dudebros trying to rap, surgical procedures on mermen, barbershop singing, and John Key drowning were all respectable results in this time-limited setting, and it was cathartic for students to both watch and produce “designs” free of usual academic stringency.

    The judges went and deliberated, with the results seeing a strong Vic presence in the winner’s circle, with at least half of each top three team consisting of sleepy Te Aro students. The rewarding of the pineapple trophies heralded the end of the competition, and students eagerly celebrated with seemingly endless amounts of drink and food.

    The after party was also a great time to reflect upon the past 24 hours. Comments reflected a differing range of experiences, from third-year student Luke Dodd’s “fucking fantastic” to fourth-year Scott Meekings’ “forked up”, going on to explicitly describe the feeling of having a fork up his urethra, though it was unclear whether this was in relation to the competition or his actual bodily situation. As the number of guests dwindled, the Vic contingent remained strong, milking every last drop of wine and every last wheel of brie, a deserving end to an impressive weekend for all those that took part

    by

  • Jonathan Franzen—Purity

    For this one, I read a lot of reviews. It was my first Franzen, you see. But nevertheless, it didn’t feel right. So I needed to see what others, those who knew his work better, were thinking. Gawker proclaims, “Call a piece of shit a piece of shit!”, while The Atlantic is more ready to worship the last name than the book itself, and The Guardian considers his oft-contentious gender representation. Stuff, well, Stuff has a yarn to Franzen, and I can’t help but sense that Franzen is over itexhausted by the publicity circus.

    The book itself is 579 pages with golden rays all over the cover, and it comes four years after his last release Freedom, which saw him on the cover of TIME magazine proclaimed as a great American novelist. As the Gawker article points out, this is Franzen’s attempt to achieve mass appeal in a way only someone envious of such wide readership could. There are fraught relationships, plentiful amounts of weird sex, an on-again-off-again relationship that has Ross and Rachel getting sick of it, and not to mention doses of pre- and post-Wall Germany, reporters chasing stories, knowledge (think Julian Assange), and some internet trolling and spyware technology in case you didn’t know Franzen was relevant.

    The central character is a twenty-something college graduate whose debt weighs around her neck: Pip, whose real name Purity generates the same discomfort as the nickname, pussycat, her mother affectionately gives her. Her journey to discover the secret of whom her father is, while seemingly unsubstantiated, sets the novel into motion.

    Pip’s job is unfulfilling; her boss’ advances confuse her, she messes up her love life, and she is smothered by the needs of her mother, who has never revealed to her daughter her real name, nor the name of her father. Pip’s roommate, a German backpacker, tells her of the Sunlight Project, and the eminent Andreas Wolf, someone who could help her find her father. Joining the project, she catches the attention and affections of Wolf and their relationship becomes strange and needy. Wolf sends Pip on an intelligence mission, to gather information on Tom, a journalist, who knows too much about Wolf’s past. Twists abound, and both Tom and Wolf begin to carry the weight of the novel. The narrative is grippingI found myself reading with my mouth agape. The threads all come together by the end, which is a little too convenient and rushed.

    The sales pitch from HarperCollins positions it thus: old fans of Franzen will hate it; new fans will love it. They’re gesturing towards a departure from Franzen’s typical style, which was devoted to an exploration in the crushing realities and minutiae of family life, and an adept ability to represent characters thoughts and minds. In Purity the same attempts arise, but it misses the beat. Characters are developed, but still lie flat and unconvincing. The psychological realities behind the characters are inconceivably created and are unexplainably toxic and tormented. I suppose it’s not your classic Franzen, but due to its “thriller” aspects it’s an enjoyable read.

    by

  • Catherine Lacey—Nobody is Ever Missing

    “I sat on a curb in Takaka, trying to think clearly about mixed feelings. Being alone was what I wanted, being alone was not what I wanted… I wanted to want a regular life: the usual husband, the usual apartment, sidewalks, noises and so on. But I had left it, I had gone elsewhere…”

    In Catherine Lacey’s debut Nobody is Ever Missing, Elyria, at 28, has left behind her life in New York to hitchhike around New Zealand. She is attempting to leave behind a traumatic past: the suicide of her sister Ruby haunts her and encircles her marriage, which is slowly disintegrating.  

    She comes to New Zealand on a whim, accepting a flippant invitation to stay at a poet’s house in Golden Bay. She’s not sure his offer is genuine and her decision to come confounds her. Wandering from the North to the South Island and back again, one silent truck to the next, Elyria finds New Zealand quiet in contrast to her loud internal chaos: “… maybe this is why I had come here. Not for the isolation, but the place where people can happily do very little, the world’s largest waiting room.”   

    This languid pattern of drifting allows her to fall into an introspective, and sometimes exhausting well: sentences run in streams, thoughts advance and turn back in on themselves. At times she embodies a millennial’s fatalism, a certainty that truth is found in cynicism. But Lacey’s writing can also veer into the humane, finding in the accumulation of thought and rumination an unexpected tenderness:   

    “We both cried and the fluorescent light tinted our skin blue and I could see right through his skin to a vein on his face, a tiny blue vein made bluer in the blue light and we held hands – it somehow made sense to hold hands with this stranger in ways it had never made sense to hold hands with any other stranger.”

    In this raw, insightful novel Lacey examines the desire to escape—sadness, the past, the self—through solitude and flight. She captures a highly perceptive mind, with an off-kilter imagination and deep sensitivity, and in doing creates a distinctive voice. As the title suggests, Elyria discovers she cannot really disappear—she can never be missing to herself. This thought strikes her as “real”, perhaps a little less lonely, a small light shining on the dark, open sea.

    by

  • How avoid looking as though you’re on the verge of a nervous breakdown

    It has reached the stage in the trimester where you are a mere burnt soy latte away from a full-scale meltdown. Every aspect of your existence is going up in flames around you and you’re sort of just sitting there muttering “this is fine, everything is absolutely fine” to your trusty companions, Fourth Glass of Wine and Unfinished Essay Due Tomorrow. You are in a such a perpetual state of sleep deprivation that your under-eye circles have become part of your facial structure, catching up the four weeks of missed 9am lectures in the two days before your assignment is due seems totally reasonable, your editor is having to bribe you with free wine to submit anything, your relationship status can be described as “she just has sex with me so she can write mean things about me in Salient”, and you haven’t been grocery shopping for about two weeks because you stress-/drunk-bought a $400 ball dress this week, despite having zero intention of attending a ball at any point in the near future. (You don’t understand, it was on sale in my size…)

    Your physical and mental health may be shot to bits, but your aesthetic doesn’t have to be. You can still have your third nervous breakdown of the week whilst immaculately dressed; it does not need to be done in the same shirt you’ve been sleeping in for the past week.

    Exam period dress etiquette:

    1. Under no circumstances whatsoever be seen DEAD in sweats at uni. Love yourself. You are better than this.
    1. Max. two coffee stains allowed on any one item of clothing before you should probably cease wearing and wash it (unless it is black, in which case you are welcome to bathe fully clothed in coffee grounds and nobody will ever know).
    1. Have your eyeliner and filled-in brows tattooed on to avoid looking as though you’ve re-enacted Jenna Marbles’ drunk makeup tutorial after a 48 hour essay-writing bender.
    1. Sleep fully made up with wet hair every night and call it “smoky eyes”, and “beachy waves” to capitalise on beauty sleep (perhaps invest in bedding that isn’t white to avoid a full-face imprint..)
    1. Avoid being the wanker wandering about in an animal onesieNOBODY is that tired.
    1. If you’ve not slept for 48 hours and look like it an extra from The Walking Dead, slather bright lipstick on and hope for the best.

    Author’s note: When your mother calls you to yell at you for buying the Jeffrey Campbell platform Timberlands she saw on your Instagram instead of groceries, you know you’ve hit rock bottom.

    by

  • The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

    ★★★½

    In 1964, NBC ran the pilot for a new spy series, The Man From U.N.C.L.E.. Only four years later, the show had a severe drop in ratings, was cancelled mid-season, and its legacy was defined by reruns continuing right into the late 1980s. That was until 2014, when Guy Ritchie penned a script for a feature film remake with long-time collaborator, Lionel Wigram. If you’ve seen Ritchie’s masterpieces Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, Snatch, or Sherlock Holmes, then you will expect a purée of smooth dialogue and stylish set from this rendition. Ritchie meets expectations for you there, but a bland plot and non-ironic clichés cause this movie to slightly miss its mark.

    Napoleon Solo (Henry Cavill) and Illya Kurkyakin (Armie Hammer) are CIA and KGB agents, respectively. They reluctantly work together with a daughter of a scientist—who, against his will, is working on a nuclear bomb for a powerful Nazi-sympathising couple—and their collaborative efforts save the world. It’s an unsophisticated plot that doesn’t seem to have matured from the 1960s, and it brought all the tired gags with it.

    Despite the film’s flawed backbone, the charisma of the cast carries the story and makes it an ultimately satisfying watch. Cavill and Hammer work fantastically together and really make the most of an amusing script and prepossessing costume. The Italian landscape, which features in the story, is another big pro for the film. Where the story is generally steadily paced, Ritchie gives us shots to take in the Neapolitan backdrop. It hasn’t been a great time for cinema in NZ. The Man From U.N.C.L.E. isn’t screening alongside many competitive options, so recommending this film is easy. The only advice I can give is to approach the film with no strings attached. It will entertain you for 116 minutes, but you’ll probably forget it within a week. You can decide whether that’s value for money, or not.

    by

  • What Makes a Good Remake

    99.9% of the global population are Harry Potter fans (2011, Yahoo Answers). This makes me think that, sometime in the future when entertainment is consumed largely through virtual reality, demand for a next gen refurbishment of the classic saga will catalyse a remake. For a faction of the fan base, the remake will be another chance to experience the mania and share it with Generation Z; while, for the rest, it will never meet the benchmark, and we will be constantly reminded about how much better the original was.

    Sprucing up an adored film for present day standards is tough. The list of bad remakes is seemingly interminable, with well-known betrayals from Hollywood including the American adaption of Death At A Funeral, 2010’s The Karate Kid, and 2003’s The Texas Chainsaw Massacreall terrible, in case you haven’t seen themHowever, while we can lament our favourite movies being tarnished by the same directors of Agent Cody Banks and Pearl Harbor, some remakes have transcended from the original by the director following at least one of the following conditions:

    1. Waiting a good, long while

    It’s pointless when a remake is done within the decade. As well as the fatigue audiences get from a repeated storyline, there are no material technological advancements to offer in this timeframe. Jackson’s King Kong was great because it took the classic epic and was able to dress it in 72 years of cinematic development.

    1. Remaking a film that is not in the IMDB Top 250 list

    Remakes and sequels often flop because we get very emotional when our expectations aren’t met. The top 250 IMDB movies have very attached fans who would be tempestuous about a remake of their number one. 2014’s Godzilla was superior to 1998’s Godzilla, because absolutely no one liked the earlier entry, and it returned us to the glory of the original Godzilla franchises.

    1. Remaking a foreign film         

    Some of the best films are foreign, but don’t reach their potential in the western mainstream because of the language barrier or cultural stylistic nuances. The original Swedish The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo was a critical and financial success. What made audiences swarm to see the American adaption only two years later was being able to see and hear the story in western conventions that they could relate to.

    by

  • Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials

    ★★½

    The second film in (presumably) a trilogy, The Scorch Trials starts off with a bang. Thomas (Dylan O’Brien) wakes up in an elevator that is rapidly ascending while red lights and warning sirens blast on screen, then cuts to him waking up from his nightmare of what was the first movie.

    The first movie was about a maze, the poor teenagers trying to escape it, and the scientists who run it. The second movie is about them trying to escape the scientists and also some zombies. Yeah, I was not really expecting a zombie movie but here we go. The second movie is meant to explain why the first took place, and how the maze was used to save the human race from the zombie virus. Honestly I am still at a loss at how these two film’s plots actually connect together.

    Most of the movie is Thomas looking over his shoulder, making a shocked expression, then taking 10 seconds to start running in the opposite direction from the zombies while the rest of his teenage comrades (includes Kaya Scodelario and Thomas Brodie-Sangster) follow close behind.

    The film takes us through a much larger world than the first, from an abandoned city in the desert, to an underground tunnel system, to a mountain range in the final act. The scenery is stunning and you can see where their budget went.

    All in all this is a fun movie where anything’s made up and the plot doesn’t matter. All we need is to know that Thomas is important and his blood holds the key to basically everything. There are love triangles, betrayal, zombies, explosions, and a whole lot of running. It even passes the Bechdel test in the final moments of the film (bravo).

    by

  • Throw away your television

    Like pretty much everyone born after 1993, I spend far too much time on the internet. This is not necessarily a problem; in fact, I love YouTube so much that I spend more time watching videos on it than I do watching television. And I have Sky in my flat!

    Yet with me it’s not all cats and viral hits—if you take a look at some of the biggest and most influential YouTube channels, gaming has an overwhelming presence. The biggest name is, of course, PewDiePie, who has had the most subscribers on the site since late 2013 by screaming and making obnoxious noises while playing games. He’s a cool guy, but his content isn’t for everyone. There is, however, more to the YouTube gaming scene than Pewds and his ilk, and I feel it is my duty as a “game journalist” to give exposure to the figures that deserve it. Here’s a list of some of my favourites, in no particular order:

    • TotalBiscuit, The Cynical Brit (youtube.com/totalhalibut)

    Depending on your tastes, TB is either a god amongst men or the most poisonous presence in the YouTube gaming scene. Yet you can’t deny that he got where he is by putting the interests of consumers above all else, as well as being a damn entertaining fellow. If your game is on PC, chances are TB will have scrutinised every single aspect of it; may heaven help you if you’ve forgotten the field of view slider or locked the framerate to 30. His integrity and brutal honesty make him a standout critic in a field tainted by shameless pandering to corporate interests—he is always worth watching. Also, YouTube comments gave him full-blown cancer.

    • Jim Sterling (youtube.com/jimsterling)

    Thank God for Jim Fucking Sterling, son. While relatively new to the scene, he has already spent years working in game journalism, which gives him an edge in games commentary that is often imitated, but never duplicated. His “Squirty Plays” and “Best of Steam Greenlight Trailers” videos have helped to expose some of the worst games ever created and the practises that led to Steam’s current state of disrepute, punctuated by the weekly “Jimquisition” where he takes the industry’s shadiest figures to task. Jim sticks up for truth, pride and garme jurnalizm, and that’s just the way we like him.

    • Stuart “Ahoy” Brown (youtube.com/XboxAhoy)

    It’s rare that an ardent gun nut comes across as witty and intelligent, but Stuart Brown pulls it off. He is most famous for his “Iconic Arms” series, where he looks at the weapons commonly found in games and gives insight into their portrayals, including how they compare to their real life counterparts. Ahoy never does anything half-arsed—his content is excellently edited with elegant graphical detail, his voiceovers give a real sense of authority to the on-screen content, and he always does his research. A real hidden gem that deserves even more attention.

    • Super Best Friends Play (youtube.com/TheSw1tcher)

    These guys prove you don’t have to scream all the time to make a decent Let’s Play. The Zaibatsu of Matt, Pat, Woolie and Liam are some of the funniest YouTubers you’re ever likely to come across, and putting them in front of a shitty game will only make them funnier. Gaming is always best with friends, and you always feel you’re part of something special whenever you watch the Zaibatsu. Highlights of the channel include RustleMania, where the boys play nothing but wrestling games, and that one time where Woolie chose Marvel vs Capcom 3 over sex. With two women. At the same time.

    • The Angry Video Game Nerd (youtube.com/Cinemassacre)

    The one that pretty much started it all. James Rolfe has been playing the AVGN for nearly ten years now, and he’s still going strong. Nearly every game reviewer on YouTube has a huge debt of gratitude to the Nerd, who has managed to turn the angry expletive-laden rant into an art form courtesy of some of the worst games ever made. The editing is a bit shoddy, but considering how much James loves B-movies they can be forgiven for looking a little rough around the edges. Still, his rants are funny enough to justify a binge session, and you’ll be calling everything a shitload of fuck in no time.

    This is but a small selection of some of the best gaming content that YouTube has to offer, so don’t be afraid to do a little digging and find something you enjoy. Even if it’s PewDiePie. I won’t judge.

    by

  • FIDLAR—Too

    ★★

    As a long-awaited follow up to their self-titled debut album, FIDLAR have released their new piece of carnage into the world in the form of Too. Firstly, these guys are one of my all-time favourite artists and I have spun their first album countless times, which is why is was so excited to hear what this new material would sound like. I was extremely impressed with the singles that were released for this album, with songs like “Leave Me Alone” and “40oz. On Repeat” seeming to hark back to the old days of FIDLAR, where the drugs flowed and the music was harsh, thrashing and extremely catchy. The song “West Coast”, which was originally released on one of the group’s earlier EPs and included for commercial release on this album, seemed to be such an easily accessible surf-punk jam emulating a really fun loving road trip song.

    Going in, I was ecstatic, and while the album did start out with a bang (the second song “Punks” absolutely blew me away as my unmatched song of the album), I was a little tired by the end. The songs seem to merge into each other and the flow is indistinguishably boring from one track to the next. Needless to say the album was extremely top heavy, with the only song really coming forward from the mess in the second half of the album being “Overdose”. It’s easily the saddest and (to a point) quietest song on the album, chronicling one of lead singer Zac Carper’s three overdoses.

    The downside to this album is the repetitiveness of the message in the lyrics. A band can only oppose authority and their parents so much before becoming contrived and lame. With that being said, in recent interviews with Carper, he does discuss in depth the shocking horrible series of events that led up to and ultimately influenced the making of this album. There isn’t really much else I can say about this album without explaining the reality of why it was written, which to be honest would just bum you guys out, and that’s not what FIDLAR are about.

    My advice, go give this album a listen and just take for what it is—a fun, thrashy piece of modern day surf punk that’s good to have a jam to and will pick your spirits up because FUCK IT DOG LIFE’S A RISK!

    by

  • A band you’ll be glad we told you about

    Albi and The Wolves are a Kiwi folk band who look set for big things. Kate Robertson caught up with frontman Chris hot off the release of their latest single “Remember Your Name” to find out a little more about the band whose name you’ll definitely be hearing more of in months to come.

    Kate: I’ve heard from people in the know that you guys work pretty damn hard—how long have you actually been together and chipping away at it?

    Chris: We started as a band around August last year. Three of our first gigs were like a mini-tour around New Zealand, and that’s kind of when the band started—so just over a year now.

    You guys have done a LOT of shows, is that by choice? Because it seems to be working!

    Just imagine it’s the most fun thing that you ever could do and so you just wanna do it a lot and keep working at it. So yeah, we’re doing it to get our name out there, but also it’s just really fun.

    You describe your sound as “folk music, but not as you know it”, did you wanna elaborate on that statement a little?

    What we do is we take folk instruments—the banjo, the fiddle and the double bass—but we use them as a platform to make something really fun happen. So the sound is diverse. I guess what I sing about and what we write about aren’t necessarily strictly traditional folk topics either. The songs don’t sound like folk songs, if that makes sense? But it’s folk music because that’s what the band is.

    You just released your debut video to accompany your latest single “Remember Your Name”, how would you describe that song and that video?

    Well the song’s idea was about impressions. So when you meet someone and you’re really struck by them, one of the things you want them to do is just remember who you are. It’s kind of a romanticised idea like “oh my gosh that person’s so utterly beautiful, interesting or awesome. I wanna talk to them and find out about them”. And you hope that you can come across in a way that makes them go “I wanna know who that person is next time”. The video kind of runs with the idea of getting a female character who’s running away from something in her life to find something better. So her story kind of goes along with the original one, but sees it from a different angle.

    Lots of bands tour throughout summer, are you guys planning to do the same?

    A tour is going to happen. It’s yet to be organised, but it will happen. And then we’re just going to keep doing what we do. We play a lot of shows—one a week if we can. We just want to keep that momentum going. We released an EP earlier this year that was kind of our first step out there, and this is kind of the next step before we start working on another EP. So lots more shows, more getting around the country and some more music.

    So if people reading wanted to find your music what would be the best way to go about it?

    It’s all on Spotify and Soundcloud, and if you want to buy it it’s all on iTunes and Bandcamp.

    Albi and The Wolves will be playing at the Wellington Folk Festival from the 23–26 October.

    by

  • About the Author ()

    Salient is a magazine. Salient is a website. Salient is an institution founded in 1938 to cater to the whim and fancy of students of Victoria University. We are partly funded by VUWSA and partly by gold bullion that was discovered under a pile of old Salients from the 40's. Salient welcomes your participation in debate on all the issues that we present to you, and if you're a student of Victoria University then you're more than welcome to drop in and have tea and scones with the contributors of this little rag in our little hideaway that overlooks Wellington.

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    : And here’s the rub with AI: it’s frightening because we trust it too much, despite it bearing the frailties, foibles, and fallibilities of the humans who created it.

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