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Red Peak
February 28, 2016 | by  | in News |
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It’s time to choose an ugly flag

On Thursday, March 3 voting will officially open for the final stage of the $26 million flag referendum.

Voters have the option of keeping the current flag or opting for Kyle Lockwood’s silver fern flag.

Flag Consideration Panel chair and Victoria University Professor John Burrows has released a statement telling New Zealanders, “we have the unique opportunity to consider all the perspectives before making our own personal choice and I encourage New Zealanders to exercise their vote in this historic decision.”

The silver fern flag has received support from a number of public figures, including Prime Minister John Key, Sir Geoffrey Palmer, Colin Meads, and Sir Richard Hadlee.

Public figures hoping to keep our current flag include Paul Henry, Parris Goebel, and actor Sam Neill.

On a local government front, Lower Hutt mayor Ray Wallace and Kapiti mayor Ross Church are the only Wellington region mayors opting to keep the current flag.

Those enrolled to vote should receive voting papers by Friday, March 11. Voting will officially close on Thursday, March 24.

R.I.P. Red Peak. Gone, but never forgotten.

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:   I wanted to write this piece, in order to connect to all tauira within the University, with the hope that we can all remind ourselves that we are a part of an environment which is valuable, no matter our culture, our beliefs or our skin colour. The ultimate purpose of this