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February 28, 2016 | by  | in News |
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White House tenancy applications closing soon

With each passing day it is looking increasingly likely that Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton will be fighting it out to be president of the US.

Both candidates are ahead in their party’s nominating contests and have recently seen wins in the Nevada caucuses.

Trump was able to pick up the third win in a row after earlier beating Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio in New Hampshire and South Carolina. South Carolina saw the unlikely front runner gain 32.5% of the vote, to Rubio’s 22.5% and Cruz’s 22.3%.

Cruz’s third placing in South Carolina was seen as a failure and could mean the end of his campaign, one which has been based on Cruz’s supposed ability to capture the evangelical and hard core conservative vote.

A further blow to the Republican Party‘s establishment was made in the Nevada caucuses with Rubio losing to Trump by double digits—Trump gained 46.7% of the vote, to Rubio’s 23.5%.

Following the withdrawal of Jeb Bush from the race, Rubio was pegged to be the establishment’s ticket and had received big endorsements from the likes of 1996 Republican nominee, Bob Dole.

Going by last Tuesday’s Nevada results, Trump has a strong lead with 79 delegates to Cruz’s 16 and Rubio’s 15. A total of 1237 is needed to win.

On the other side, the Nevada caucuses called into question the candidacy of senator Bernie Sanders, who lost to Secretary Clinton—52.6% to Sanders’ 47.3%.

Secretary Clinton’s support was boosted by minority voters, with whom Sanders has polled poorly in the past.

Sanders had previously performed well in states where the Democratic base is predominantly white, but as the makeup of the democratic voters in the primaries diversify, polls suggest Sanders’ support may be slipping.

Clinton is currently sitting at 503 delegates to Sanders’ 70. To win the democratic nomination either candidate will have to win 2383 delegates.

Tuesday will give a clear indication of who the Democrats and Republicans will elect as their respective presidential nominee. Republicans have 595 delegates at stake and the Democrats have 1004.

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