Viewport width =
March 6, 2016 | by  | in News |
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

Harassment is not fucking cool

At least ten people who live and work near the University of Otago have signed a petition to the Vice-Chancellor calling for action to be taken on harassment.

The letter read, “this is not another letter about couch burning or broken glass… I’m afraid it’s much more serious.”

It proceeded to list abuse which had been experienced near the university, which included “racist speech/slurs, street harassment towards women, and trans and homophobia.”

One of the letter’s co-signers, PhD student Emma Tumilty, told the Otago Daily Times last week, “what upsets us most was this aggression towards others, [towards] women, or people who are slightly different—hurling bottles and abuse at people as they pass.”

One ex-student told media a van load of men shouted at her, “if your dog wasn’t in your car I’d rape you,” at 5:30pm on a weeknight.

Aside from their own personal safety, a main concern of those speaking out is the way such behaviour normalises rape culture when not properly addressed.

Victoria University has a webpage dedicated to sexual violence awareness which states that sexual harassment of any kind undermines safety and respect, and is a breach of the university’s Student Conduct Statute.

Students experiencing harassment can contact Student Interest and Disputes Resolution Advisor Yvonne Oldfield to seek advice and support on (04) 463 5023.

 

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

About the Author ()

Add Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent posts

  1. Hello!
  2. Misc
  3. On Optimism
  4. Speak for yourself
  5. JonBenét
  6. Ten things I wish my friends knew about being Māori
  7. 2016 Statistics
  8. I Wrote for Salient for Four Years for Dick and Free Speech
  9. Stop Liking and Commenting on Your Mates’ New Facebook Friendships
  10. Victoria Takes Learning Global
pink

Editor's Pick

Ten things I wish my friends knew about being Māori

: 1). I wish my friends knew that when they ask me what “percentage” of Māori I am—half, quarter, or eighth—they make me feel like a human pie chart. I don’t know how people can ask this so nonchalantly, but they do. So I want to let you know: this is a very threatening