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March 20, 2016 | by  | in News |
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Proud but not Protected

Health care for queer and trans people has come to the fore during recent LGBTQI+ pride celebrations, which saw the Proud Hui come to Wellington.

The hui was held by International Lesbian Gay Bisexual Trans and Intersex (ILGA) Oceania, and it brought over 200 people to the capital.

The conference focused on improving healthcare for queer and trans people in Oceania, aiming to “re-ignite the fires of the LGBTI community on issues of Human Rights and Health in the states of Papua New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand, the South Pacific, Melanesia and the Micronesian Islands.”

Mani Bruce Mitchell, one of the organizers of the hui and ILGA advocate, told Salient, “in New Zealand gender identity is not a ‘protected’ category in our human rights legislation, […which means] in New Zealand we currently have very poor access to health care.”

Currently there is no recommended care pathway in New Zealand DHBs (including Wellington’s) for transgender people to receive hormone treatment or gender reassignment surgery. This is despite an increasing number of transgender people being referred to endocrinologists and other doctors regarding gender transition.

The Proud Hui welcomed people from all over Oceania for the event, and celebrated the 30 year anniversary of the passing of the Homosexual Law Reform Bill.  

 

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