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April 17, 2016 | by  | in News |
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CYF report

The latest Child, Youth and Family (CYF) report states that vulnerable children will no longer abandoned by state when they turn 17.

Minister of Social Development Anne Tolley has announced that state care will be extended to 18 year olds, with the option of staying in full care until 21.

There will also be the option to receive continued support until the age of 25.

Although still legally children, youth are currently left stranded by the state in the limbo of non-adulthood, while being denied the privileges an adult would be afforded.

The outsourcing of care has been nominated as the means to achieve this increased support. This has raised concerns among some politicians that non-government agencies will value profit over progress, with some concerned that doing so would decrease the overall quality of care.

Green’s co-leader Metiria Turei was concerned that companies could, “make a profit out of vulnerable children and their families.”

Labour Party children’s spokesperson Jacinda Ardern said she was “really pleased to see that the panel has recommended that we have one consolidated agency working on child wellbeing issues.” She did however raise concerns about where the money for this extension of services would come from, saying others should not suffer because of it.

The newly-structured CYF system is said to be implemented by March 2017.

 

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