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April 10, 2016 | by  | in News |
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On Thursdays we wear black

The Thursdays in Black (TIB) campaign was officially launched by several speakers at VUWSA’s IGM last Wednesday.

Ella Cartwright spoke about the background of the campaign, as well as its resuscitation and importance (it was initially spearheaded in the 1980s by Jan Logie).

Cartwright said VUWSA had been very supportive of the campaign; and talked about TIB’s plans, which focus on consent education and support services for survivors.

Rory Lenihan-Ikin encouraged men to break their silence on the issue by speaking up and questioning other men, wearing black on Thursdays to show their support, and for issues around sexual violence to no longer be deemed a “women’s issue.”

Tamatha Paul, first year student and Weir House resident, said she was drawn to the university because of the activism on campus. She spoke of sexual violence issues facing students and encouraged first year students to get behind the cause.

Chrissy brown, VUWSA Equity officer, said students and staff wearing black out of solidarity would make sexual violence survivors feel empowered, and called on students for their input towards the campaign.

Izzy O’Neill, Tertiary Women New Zealand National Women’s Rights Officer, encouraged involvement from not only students, but faculty and staff as well.

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