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April 3, 2016 | by  | in News |
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RIP Media Studies Cloob

The Media Studies Cloob have rebranded themselves to the VUW Media Studies Society.

The name change emerged from their AGM and the Facebook group name was officially changed by re-elected co-president Becca Hawkes at 8:25pm that night.

Like the flag referendum, a single transferable vote method was used, with VUW Media Society coming out on top. This came as a shock to some as it was later revealed the inclusion of “society” was a last minute decision.

Second place was taken out by the option, Media Studies Club, third by the previous name, and last place by, Bonanza.

Co-president Bronwyn Curtis told Salient she was slightly disappointed by the winning name, saying she had “already purchased a golf club full of jellybeans” to accompany the many “club” puns that could have been made from the name VUW Media Studies Club. Despite this missed opportunity, Hawkes said it was worth noting that “VUW Media Society” created a fun play on words with the MDIA102 paper—titled, Media, Society and Politics.

Hawkes and Curtis are now seeking new puns to accompany the new name, telling Salient, “puns are important.” Anyone with suggestions can attend a meeting at 4:00pm on Thursdays in SU219.

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