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April 17, 2016 | by  | in News |
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The Wellington Binder Exchange

A new project seeking to provide chest binders for transgender youth has launched in Wellington.

The Wellington Binder Exchange aims to provide free binders for youth aged 18 and under who may not be able to access binders themselves.

A binder is a vest designed to compress the breasts to achieve a more masculine appearance, something that assists with feelings of discomfort—sometimes called body or gender dysmorphia.

Binders have a significant effect on the transition from female to male for transgender, genderqueer, and non-binary people. The event’s coordinator and VUW student Charles Prout saying they are “an important part of the transition process.”

The Exchange is hoping to help fill the gap for transmasculine youth in the city.

Prout said, “we look forward to working together with Evolve Wellington Youth Service, and the Capital and Coast DHB, to improve services for trans youth and assist in the development of care pathways.”

Organisers are asking for people to pass on any binders that are in wearable condition. There will be a drop in session every Wednesday where young people can get binders at Evolve Wellington Youth Service (Level 2, James Smith building, corner of Cuba and Manners Streets).

 

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