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May 8, 2016 | by  | in News |
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Beyoncé on campus!

In weeks following the release of Beyoncé’s latest visual album Lemonade, the Victoria University Beyoncé Appreciation Students’ Association (VUBASA) has seen a marked spike in interest.

The VUBASA was founded in October 2012 and has been providing students with regular life-enhancing Beyoncé updates ever since.

The admin team is currently made up of one VUW alumni and three current students, two of whom are in their final year of study.

The admins describe the association as a place where “students can come and enjoy all things Beyoncé in between studies, but also see Beyoncé’s impact on the world.”

The team are currently petitioning to bring Bey’s “record breaking” Formation World Tour to New Zealand shores.

One admin believed a visit from Queen B would be a positive fit with our Beehive, aka “Beyhive,” and said Kiwi fans deserved a chance to “spend all the money we don’t have on concert tickets and merchandise.”

Those wanting to collect signatures for the cause can submit all documents to the VUBASA via their Facebook page, with admins adding that signatures from “politicians, chancellors, media personalities, and Lorde” would be great additions to the cause.

 

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