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May 1, 2016 | by  | in News |
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Kelburn residents angry about non-existent building

Kelburn residents have voiced concerns during a hearing panel about Victoria University’s acquisition of the Gordon Wilson flats on the Terrace.

The former Housing New Zealand flats are now owned by the university and are in the process of being rezoned.

Residents were primarily worried about noise and disorderly behaviour, with one going as far as to say the university “couldn’t be trusted” to establish accommodation that wouldn’t upset neighbouring residents.  

Despite these fears, there has at no point been explicit mention of plans to develop student accommodation in the area.

In a written proposal submitted to the Wellington City Council last year by Urban Perspectives on behalf of the university, it was proposed that the flats be demolished to create a “pathway” to Kelburn campus.

Campus Services director Jenny Bentley said the demolition of the flats would support “the university’s vision is to physically link the Kelburn campus to the Terrace by way of a safe, convenient and attractive pedestrian access.”

The Gordon Wilson flats have been vacant since May 2012 when they were deemed unsafe, with engineers saying the facade could collapse in an earthquake or “strong wind.”

 

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