Viewport width =
May 8, 2016 | by  | in News |
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

Oh Dairy Me

New Zealand is set to welcome an influx of tech entrepreneurs following the establishment of a new Global Impact Visa (GIV).

The GIVs will be offered over a four-year trial period in the hopes that an influx of Silicon Valley-types will help offset the increasingly struggling dairy industry and diversify the economy.

Approximately 400 of of these visas will be issued during this trial period.

Immigration Minister Michael Woodhouse said the visas would “help expand the pool of smart capital by attracting individual investors and entrepreneurs to live here in New Zealand.”

“GIVs will help meet the government’s Business Growth Agenda innovation and investment objectives by lifting innovation in New Zealand,” he added.

Rod Drury, CEO of global accounting software company Xero, thought the GIVs alone were not enough, saying “because we’re such a small market and we’re the furthest country away from any other trading partner, then it’s so much more important for us.”

The Government’s announcement mirrors a similar call made by Australia in December that came as part of Malcolm Turnbull’s “ideas boom,” which seeks to boost innovation.

 

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

About the Author ()

Comments are closed.

Recent posts

  1. SWAT
  2. Ravished by the Living Embodiment of All Our University Woes
  3. New Zealand’s First Rainbow Crossing is Here (and Queer)
  4. Chloe Has a Yarn About Mental Health
  5. “Stick with Vic” Makes “Insulting” and “Upsetting” Comments
  6. Presidential Address
  7. Final Review
  8. Tears Fall, and Sea Levels Rise
  9. It’s Fall in my Heart
  10. Queer Coverage: Local, National, and International LGBTQIA+ News
Website-Cover-Photo7

Editor's Pick

This Ain’t a Scene it’s a Goddamned Arm Wrestle

: Interior – Industrial Soviet Beerhall – Night It was late November and cold as hell when I stumbled into the Zhiguli Beer Hall. I was in Moscow, about to take the trans-Mongolian rail line to Beijing, and after finding someone in my hostel who could speak English, had decided