Viewport width =
May 8, 2016 | by  | in News |
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

Oh Dairy Me

New Zealand is set to welcome an influx of tech entrepreneurs following the establishment of a new Global Impact Visa (GIV).

The GIVs will be offered over a four-year trial period in the hopes that an influx of Silicon Valley-types will help offset the increasingly struggling dairy industry and diversify the economy.

Approximately 400 of of these visas will be issued during this trial period.

Immigration Minister Michael Woodhouse said the visas would “help expand the pool of smart capital by attracting individual investors and entrepreneurs to live here in New Zealand.”

“GIVs will help meet the government’s Business Growth Agenda innovation and investment objectives by lifting innovation in New Zealand,” he added.

Rod Drury, CEO of global accounting software company Xero, thought the GIVs alone were not enough, saying “because we’re such a small market and we’re the furthest country away from any other trading partner, then it’s so much more important for us.”

The Government’s announcement mirrors a similar call made by Australia in December that came as part of Malcolm Turnbull’s “ideas boom,” which seeks to boost innovation.

 

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

About the Author ()

Add Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent posts

  1. Issue 00
  2. Interview with Andrew Little — Part One
  3. Editors’ Letter
  4. The Trump Front
  5. Political Round-Up
  6. The Party Line
  7. Things I wish I knew
  8. On the periphery of the imagined world
  9. Boulcott Blues
  10. Rankine Brown Update
Newtown, between 1908-10. Photograph taken by Sydney Charles Smith. 1888-1972: Photographs of New Zealand. Courtesy of Alexander Turnbull Library. 1/1-019663-G

Editor's Pick

On the periphery of the imagined world

: - SPONSORED - For the local, Wellington is a city of few surprises. At 500 feet, a larger, more formidable metropolis, like the sprawling small print of terms and conditions, enfeebles any sense of total comprehension. In contrast, the familiar Wellington harbour lined by a city