Viewport width =
May 15, 2016 | by  | in News |
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

Time to think twice about becoming a teacher

A survey of recently graduated primary school teachers has exposed the debt and stress many are facing when trying to find and maintain a job in the industry.

The survey, conducted by the New Zealand Educational Institute (NZEI), found that over 50% of recent graduates reported that having to reapply for their jobs had negative effects on their ability to teach.

Of those surveyed, 311 students had taken out student loans to pay for their training, with 20% owing over $30,000.

Teachers in the beginning stages of their careers added comments such as, “it feels like new teachers are being punished for being new by having a lot of uncertainty about the future” and “to be honest, if I had known how difficult it would be to get a permanent position in the area I live, I would have never trained as a teacher.”

Spokesperson for the NZEI, Stephanie Lambourn expressed that there is a shortage of primary school jobs available, adding “it’s incredibly stressful to have that sort of job insecurity.”

First year Victoria University student in the initial stages of her teaching studies, Crystal Walsh, said “it’s a scary concept thinking I might study here for three years to come out with a student loan to repay and no real job opportunities.”

When asked whether or not the Faculty of Education should further limit enrolments to the degree, Associate Dean for the Faculty of Education Dr Robin Averill said “the university does not and cannot manage the numbers against national job availability.”

She added that “a high number of Victoria graduates do go onto be employed in teaching positions.”

To increase chances of graduate employment, Averill advised those currently studying to become a teacher to get experience working with children by way of sports coaching or helping with a school club.

She also advised aiming for high grades and taking undergraduate subjects that are in demand such as Te reo Māori and statistics.

 

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

About the Author ()

Comments are closed.

Recent posts

  1. An (im)possible dream: Living Wage for Vic Books
  2. Salient and VUW tussle over Official Information Act requests
  3. One Ocean
  4. Orphanage voluntourism a harmful exercise
  5. Interview with Grayson Gilmour
  6. Political Round Up
  7. A Town Like Alice — Nevil Shute
  8. Presidential Address
  9. Do You Ever Feel Like a Plastic Bag?
  10. Sport
1

Editor's Pick

In Which a Boy Leaves

: - SPONSORED - I’ve always been a fairly lucky kid. I essentially lucked out at birth, being born white, male, heterosexual, to a well off family. My life was never going to be particularly hard. And so my tale begins, with another stroke of sheer luck. After my girlfriend sugge