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July 17, 2016 | by  | in News |
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Helen Kelly in the Portrait Gallery

Former President of the New Zealand Council of Trade Unions (CTU) and social justice campaigner Helen Kelly has been honoured by Wellington City with a portrait at the New Zealand Portrait Gallery.

The portrait, created by artist Lee Robinson and donated by the city, was unveiled by Mayor Celia Wade-Brown at a recent ceremony.

Kelly was CTU President from 2007 until October 2015, and prior to this served five years in the role of General Secretary of the Association of University Staff (now the New Zealand Tertiary Education Union). Kelly has recently become a campaigner for medical marijuana, a position which has emerged during her battle against lung cancer.

Mayor Celia Wade-Brown commented that Kelly has “been a passionate Wellingtonian and deserves to be recognised for the great work she’s achieved in the capital for so many New Zealanders.”

The portrait is now on display at the New Zealand Portrait Gallery, amongst portraits of prominent New Zealanders who have contributed to the country’s development through culture, politics, or social change.

 

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