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July 31, 2016 | by  | in VUWSA |
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VUWSA Exec

This week I thought I would compare VUWSA’s Model of Tertiary Education to rugby.

I have been leading some research and consultation around the Productivity Commission’s investigation into the tertiary sector. This is what I told them and the people at the TEU Voices of Tertiary Education Symposium:

  • Binding is important. Before we engage and push forward with our scrum together, there’s no point trying unless we are all working together (looking at you, Universities New Zealand).
  • It’s a game of two halves, fair enough going full brunt, exhausting your resources, and benching before half time. I’m sure it’ll get you to the top of the table (see: Auckland Uni), but is it worth it if your team is tired and underperforming in the second half and worst of all injured for the next game? This is currently how the tertiary funding model works: make sure you win (grow your EFTS) or you’re out of the game
  • We need to referee a game that’s fair. The rules of the game (ie. the funding model, StudyLink) dictate the degree to which people will be able to enjoy and play the game.
  • The game is only at its best when the players, audience, coaches, bench warmers, touch judges, referees, water carriers, and commentators are all being constructive to the purpose of the game and leading it to a better outcome. Each person from the groundskeeper to the captain of the team has a responsibility to lead the game to its best level. Even the two teams in opposition are ultimately competing for the same purpose—to be the best at the game.

While the game is still being played let’s all look after each other (and make sure we catch all the Pokémon our timetables allow us).

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