Viewport width =
cheeseburgertower
August 14, 2016 | by  | in Features |
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

Page Works

This issue we asked seven young Wellington-based artists and recent Fine Arts graduates to create an original ‘page work’ for Salient. The page became the site for the artwork, each artist free to utilise it as they liked. Each artist provided text to contextualise their artworks and to give an entry point for readers.

The artists were given complete freedom to produce whatever they liked for the page. We did not want to curate a certain style or concept for the artist to follow, leaving the artists to respond to the page in their own way.

Varying from the poetic to the absurd, we hope each work will extend your understanding of what is happening in local contemporary art, and how the ideas and concerns of young artists can manifest beyond paint on a canvas, or clay on a form.

Thanks to Gordon Harris for sponsoring this initiative, to the artists for contributing, and to the editors for opening up their pages with little knowledge of what they were letting themselves in for.   

Cover Image by Laura Duffy

BENT

bent

(g) everyday painter

2016

bong hit on notebook

190 x 270mm

Among some of the classic conceptual project ideas, are the collections of random or specific things, of rare or ordinary processes, and of high and low values. The stain on the right is part of a recent body of work called Everyday Paintings. The series is informed by routine and habit and has as a focus the recreational consumption of cannabis, or chop if you like. Using smoke as pigment, the medium is only live for very short time, making it hard to control or gain composition. Hence we worked on the series every day until finished in an attempt and intent to imply and apply blurs to art / life divisions.

You can find Bent’s work in the public or on www.bentdomain.com.

 

Callum Devlin

callum

b.1993

ENFP

Aquarius

I want to find myself. Not me now, but like, future me. I want to sit down for a coffee and talk to them. I want to ask them everything. I have a feeling that somewhere out there, there’s this person. Someone of similar circumstances, who has made similar decisions, and had a similar amount of good fortune up until this current point. My plan is to go out and find this person.*

On the opposite page is a WANTED ad that ran in the public notices section of the Dominion Post on Friday, August 5, 2015. The Dominion Post has a print run of 68,000, with a total readership of around 180,000 people. This is the first, tiny step, in a documentary project that I am undertaking. Honestly, this is the best bit. I have had this idea for months and talked about it way too much with people that mostly aren’t interested. Now it’s a thing. A tiny wee thing that cost $38.64 to (literally) materialise.

*If this person is you, please get in touch.

 

Claire Harris

claire

What is your most memorable experience of art?

Seeing the music video for Madonna’s “Like a Prayer” on TV as a child and watching all the scary knick knacks from my Catholic grandparents’ house get repurposed into something glamorous and sexy that made complete sense without me knowing why. It was like an awakening into all the possibilities of meaning that were in images. Also after that I could sleep in Nana and Pop’s spare bedroom without being afraid that the Sacred Heart of Jesus would eat me.

What ideas or theme or issues do you focus on with your work?

Humour, celebrity, popular culture, auto-biography, fandom, art as therapy, the public performance of emotions and trauma, former child stars, boy bands, and professional wrestling. I’m pretty narcissistic in my art work. It’s almost always about the cultural landscape and forces that have made me who I am, and all the stuff I’m obsessed with as a result.

What is your favourite medium?

In general, photography. I love good photography.

My favourite medium to work in is endurance video marathon watch along. Actually anything where there is some kind of sequence or narrative, whether that’s video, live performance, zines / comics, or installations.

I do worry that my approach is half-arsed. I always seem to learn just enough about something to do (roughly) the thing I wanted to do, then switch to something else. Hopefully I’ve got another 60+ years of art output to get properly good at something.

 

Faith Wilson—Ten things about me

faith

  1. ‘When you’re the absolute best, you get hated on the most.’
  2. ‘My goal, if I was going to do art, fine art, would have been to become Picasso or greater… That always sounds so funny to people, comparing yourself to someone who has done so much, and that’s a mentality that suppresses humanity…’
  3. ‘One of my biggest achilles heels has been my ego. And if I, Faith Wilson, can remove my ego, I think there’s hope for everyone.’
  4. ‘I am God’s vessel. But my greatest pain in life is that I will never be able to see myself perform live.’ 
  5. ‘I will go down as the voice of this generation, of this decade, I will be the loudest voice.’
  6. ‘I feel like I’m too busy writing history to read it.’
  7. ‘I’m doing pretty good as far as geniuses go… I’m like a machine. I’m a robot. You cannot offend a robot.’
  8. ‘The Bible had 20, 30, 40, 50 characters in it. You don’t think that I would be one of the characters of today’s modern Bible?’
  9. ‘I am so credible and so influential and so relevant that I will change things.’
  10. ‘I jog in Lanvin.’

 

Izzy Carson

izzy

This is my apartment for another nineteen days

it’s too hot to sleep

in this small room

people tell me the temperature in fahrenheit and I convert it to celsius on my phone

I leave my bedroom door open and turn on the fan at night

.

I think it’s important to find something sacred in your normal spaces, the everyday architecture of your life

it’s like when you visit a museum or a cathedral

the hush that comes over you as you feel so small but like there is so much significance in your presence, in your history, in the history of this place

I like these precious moments in my room, finding things hidden

the past things and the things we end up leaving behind

.

This is my third home in four months

there are holes in the wall from absent paintings or photographs hung in a previous tenancy, little punctuation marks; full stops

wavy brush strokes of mismatched paint

someone’s smudged fingerprints on the doorframe, a reminder of bodies that have slept where I am trying to sleep now

there is a tiny metal pin in the shape of an angel that landed on the floor as I moved a chest of drawers

it’s gold

and sharp, if I had stepped on it I would have hurt myself

but I heard it fall and so I put it back

izzycarson.tumblr.com

 

Jon Drypnz

jon drypnz

 

Lokal Stories

lokal

What is your most memorable experience of art?

Hana: I started crying when I saw Shannon Te Ao’s Follow the Party of the Whale at the Blue Oyster a few years ago during Puaka Matariki. It’s so beautiful and meditative. I cannot stress how powerful and important that work was in being shown in Ōtepoti, because of the denial and erasure of our traumatic colonial history in that community.

Jordana: In 2011, at the age of seventeen, visiting an art gallery (City Gallery Wellington), for the first time on a Dannevirke High School field trip. Everyone teasing me for crying on the bus home over Erica van Zon’s Untitled (2009), a neon text work stating “Don’t Make your Heart a Lion’s Den.” As part of the group exhibition Tender is the Night, curated by Heather Galbraith.

What is your favourite interpretation or misinterpretation of your work?

Hana: A reviewer said that my work was “confessional.” I guess he felt that me speaking to my experiences of gendered emotional and domestic labour in the service and fine arts industries is just gossipy right?  

Jordana: Still Life With Flowers (Narcissus), my first video based performance piece made during my final year of fine arts school (2015). In the work I am reclining naked, veiled in silk drapery, gripping a bouquet, sustaining a pose like Manet’s Olympia, (which eventually made me convulse). The tutors speculated I was recieving cunniligus out of frame.   

How did you come to call yourself an artist, and are you comfortable calling yourself an artist?

Hana: I would prefer to be called a mogul. Lol. No idk, I’m a writer more than an artist.

Jordana: I didn’t, everyone else did and yes.

What ideas or theme or issues do you focus on with your work?

Hana: I feel like all the work I’ve been making recently centres around how many tabs I have open on my computer and a lot of my texts are more like extended subtweets. ATM I’m interested in the intersections between capitalism and colonisation through text, technology, and performance. I’m really interested in intimacy too, like critical intimacy.

Jordana: Digital documentation of the self as an act of self defense, and preservation against the erasure of women’s lived experiences and histories.

What is your favourite medium?

Hana: Google docs, tote bags, seminars, and clothing.

Jordana: Photography, video, and performance.

What do you want the viewer to feel when they look at your page?

Hana: Warmth, empathy.

Jordana: Like I’m in love with them.

Tell a story about your page:

Hana: I hope that you feel okay.

Jordana: This should feel like looking into the sun.

Find out more at kollektivgallery.com/lokalstories, Twitter #lokalstories, Instagram @lokal_stories.

Lokal Stories is an Aotearoa based initiative, funded by Wellington City Council and Creative New Zealand, and directed by Sophie Giblin. Self Care Mantra was written by Lokal Stories artists and writers Jordana Bragg and Hana Pera Aoake, and was designed by our collaborator Sean Burn.

Lokal Stories combats cyber hate towards marginalised groups and explores how neo-colonialism has changed online identities today. We encourage digital togetherness by learning how to be a good ally and practice self care URL and IRL.

 

Louisa Beatty

louisa

What is your most memorable experience of art?

Last year at the CIRCUIT symposium Sean Kerr presented his talk via desk lamp and I’ve just finished watching the series Stranger Things, which if you’ve seen it (everyone should) this will sound familiar (so maybe that’s why it’s fresh on my mind atm), but it was pretty great watching this lamp discuss the activation of objects in a lecture theatre of people.

What is your favourite medium?

I’m pretty open to using whatever materials I have access to. For the past couple of years most of my work has been made with a lil handy cam that I was given, which suits me because it’s a really easy and immediate way of collecting. I’m a bit of a hoarder. I think photography / moving image became a quick fix for constantly trying to drag rocks and trash I liked home with me.

Tell a story about your page:

This is a print of a photo of a video of a fire extinguisher and a fan in the Gaudí museum.

http://louisa-photostream.tumblr.com.

 

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

About the Author ()

Salient is a magazine. Salient is a website. Salient is an institution founded in 1938 to cater to the whim and fancy of students of Victoria University. We are partly funded by VUWSA and partly by gold bullion that was discovered under a pile of old Salients from the 40's. Salient welcomes your participation in debate on all the issues that we present to you, and if you're a student of Victoria University then you're more than welcome to drop in and have tea and scones with the contributors of this little rag in our little hideaway that overlooks Wellington.

Add Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent posts

  1. Hello!
  2. Misc
  3. On Optimism
  4. Speak for yourself
  5. JonBenét
  6. Ten things I wish my friends knew about being Māori
  7. 2016 Statistics
  8. I Wrote for Salient for Four Years for Dick and Free Speech
  9. Stop Liking and Commenting on Your Mates’ New Facebook Friendships
  10. Victoria Takes Learning Global
pink

Editor's Pick

Ten things I wish my friends knew about being Māori

: 1). I wish my friends knew that when they ask me what “percentage” of Māori I am—half, quarter, or eighth—they make me feel like a human pie chart. I don’t know how people can ask this so nonchalantly, but they do. So I want to let you know: this is a very threatening