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August 14, 2016 | by  | in News |
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White privilege news 101

Two Lincoln University students were “bloody nervous” after discovering the house they burgled belongs to one of Auckland’s biggest brothel owners.

Thomas Steck, 22, and Richard Tattersfield, 20, caused $14,518 in damage and stole items worth $3560 from Kim Pickard’s holiday home. The pair were convicted for Great Barrier Island’s first burglary in 17 years.

Pickard owns Femme Fatale, “New Zealand’s No.1 gentlemen’s club” according to its website.

The pair encountered Pickard’s property after a short, alcohol-induced, motorboat trip at 1am on April 13.

Tattersfield did not know “how the fuck it happened.”

They gained entry by smashing a French door, before stealing important items and causing damage with an axe found at the site.

Steck, denying the burglary was premeditated, said they could only remember “glimpses” of the night.

The pair reported their actions at the Christchurch Central Police Station, handing over some of the property.

While Pickard was open to a discharge without conviction, Judge John Strettel deemed the burglary too serious and sentenced them to 150 hours’ community work.

Steck was “miffed” with the judge’s decision, saying “he knew he was going against a lot of people’s wishes.”

Losses and damages were paid for.

 

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