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September 17, 2016 | by  | in Theatre |
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Getting Involved with Theatre in Wellington: Fringe Festival 2017

What is it?

The New Zealand Fringe Festival is an open-access, non-programmed festival—anyone at all can enter a show. If you pay the registration fees and the show is (basically) legal, you’re in!

Does it cost?

There is a one-off compulsory cost with Fringe and this is the registration fee and refundable bond. The fees differ depending on the type of show that you enter. Beyond this fee it is up to you how much you spend on a show, it could be $0.

What are the benefits of participating?

Participating in Fringe means that your event will be listed in 25,000 copies of a printed programme and included on the Fringe website. You are provided with a platform to launch your work and the festival atmosphere allows you the chance to wow audiences. This is the biggest and longest running Fringe in New Zealand and all Fringe staff are available to offer one-on-one advice. A series of free workshops are also held on a range of subjects including production and marketing, budgeting, and front of house.

At the end of the festival there is a chance to win Fringe awards for outstanding work.

When do I need to apply by?

The deadline for applications is OCTOBER 10, 2016.

How do I apply?

Step One: Go to fringe.co.nz and everything you need is on their home page.

Step Two: Click on the “Artists Information” tab which gives you information regarding fee information, a sign-up cheat sheet, and funding guide.

Step Three: Click on the “Register Now” tab which will take you to the registration page (this page explains everything you need to know about signing up and has a step-by-step registration guide).

Quote from the Fringe Festival director, Hannah Clarke:  

“I’ve just spent time at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe sleeping on a sofa and submerged in the greatest art and it was wild, intense, and inspiring! The whole time I couldn’t stop thinking about Wellington’s Fringe and all the great art we have here. NZ Fringe Artist Services Manager Sasha Tilly has been seconded to one of the biggest venues in Edinburgh, the Pleasance, and together we’ve been working through everything you need to register for Fringe 2017. Check out our artist resources on the Fringe website—fringe.co.nz/artists—and get in touch with any questions or for advice, we’re keen to help you find the right venue for the best Fringe time in 2017. Looking forward to hearing from you! Rock on Fringe 2017!!!”

 

Coming Up

Short + Sweet Festival

When: October 19–22, at BATS Theatre

Book tickets: bats.co.nz

Another groovy festival to look out for is the annual big-little Festival called Short+Sweet. The programme consists of ten ten-minute works which cover a range of styles and subjects. Each performance concludes with the audience being asked to vote for their favourite work to help determine the top productions that make it to the Gala Final of each genre.

PlayShop Live

When: Every Friday night until October 28, 9pm, at BATS Theatre

Book tickets: bats.co.nz

Live is late-night improvised comedy without limits—fast, physical, and unpredictable. A team of four skilled actors and a musician create spontaneous theatre with nothing but each other, the audience, and their fiendish imaginations.

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