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October 8, 2016 | by  | in News |
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Society’s sponsorship cancelled after injury

A stunt that caused serious injury has resulted in two major sponsors withdrawing their sponsorship of the University of Canterbury Engineering Society (ENSOC).

DB Breweries and insurance company MAS pulled their sponsorship after an engineering student lit his hair on fire and jumped off the roof of his flat into a pool in September as part of his candidacy for the ENSOC executive.

A spokesperson for DB said they were “absolutely devastated” and would never knowingly support such an act.

MAS were unaware of the initiation and said they would never condone it, terminating sponsorship immediately.

Police have spoken to the student’s family and would not investigate further.

ENSOC requires candidates to notify the AGM adjudicator of their stunt before filming.

The stunt is designed to “prove to the audience that you are the best man or woman for the job, and the lengths you are willing to go for the betterment of the club.”

Stunts causing injury are not accepted. Candidates are also asked to consider the long-term consequences of their stunt.

Following the accident ENSOC scrapped the stunt requirement for 2017 executive hopefuls and footage has been deleted.

The university declined to comment.

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