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October 9, 2016 | by  | in News |
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Tragedy strikes UC hall

Last week emergency services attended to the sudden death of a female student at the University of Canterbury’s Rochester and Rutherford Hall.

Police have confirmed that the death is not suspicious and have referred the matter to the coroner. Police will not confirm the cause of death.

The university said in a statement that the incident was “a rare and tragic accident.”

An individual at the hall who was close to the victim said “she was one of the most caring and thoughtful people I’ve ever met. She always made my day so much better.”

Rochester and Rutherford Hall is a predominantly first-year hall.  

The university’s acting Vice-Chancellor Dr Hamish Cochrane said the university was very aware that this has occurred in a busy part of the year for students, with end of year exams and assignments looming.

Students and staff have been advised of the support services that are available to them.

 

Where to get help

Lifeline: 0800 543 354

Depression Helpline (8am to 12 midnight): 0800 111 757

Healthline: 0800 611 116

Samaritans: 0800 726 666

Suicide Crisis Helpline (aimed at those in distress, or those who are concerned about the wellbeing of someone else): 0508 828 865 (0508 TAUTOKO)

Youthline: 0800 376 633, free text 234, or email talk@youthline.co.nz.

 

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