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March 27, 2017 | by  | in Poetry |
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AmneSIA

get real

we were always

just stepping stones

erich von daniken

saw the footprints of the gods

chris connery

saw the trademarks of capitalism

who’s gonna give a damn if they don’t/can’t remember

that the whole of the donut is filled with coconuts

they’re after american pie in the east

and some kind of zen in the west

east and west are of course relative

the rim of our basin

is overflowing with kava

but the basin of their rim

is empty

they take their kava in capsules

so it’s easy to forget

that there’s life and love and learning

between

asia and america

between

asia and america

there’s an ocean

and in this ocean

the stepping stones

are

getting real

 

Teresia Teaiwa

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