Viewport width =
April 10, 2017 | by  | in News |
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

Iconic artist dies

American artist James Rosenquist died in New York on March 31 at age 83.

Rosenquist was a pioneer of the Pop Art movement. He worked as a commercial billboard painter before garnering success in the 1960s for his large-scale paintings that drew together an eclectic mix of imagery from mass media and advertising.

He distinguished his work from his contemporaries Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein, stating, “I was never concerned with logos or brand names or movie stars… [or] ironic simulations of pop media; I wanted to make mysterious pictures.”

Rosenquist was interested in images “common enough to pass without notice.” He leaves behind a body of work that renders a “blue-collar view of American things without mockery… with a deadpan literalness and a directness that suggested innocence,” said art historian Judith Goldman.

Rosenquist’s best-known painting is the F-111. Completed in 1964, this was an 86-foot long piece protesting US militarism in relation to the Vietnam War. Of the F-111, Robert Hughes from Time magazine, wrote “[it] affected people in a way few works of political art had done since the murals of Diego Rivera in the 1930s.”

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on Twitter

About the Author ()

Comments are closed.

Recent posts

  1. Your silent cries left unheard
  2. How it Works: On the Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill
  3. Is Vic Books Missing Out on the Living Wage Campaign?
  4. Jesus Christ Super-Nah, Saviour’s New Political Party May Need Miracle
  5. Issue 12 – Friendship
  6. SWAT: Friendship Column
  7. Inevitable Entanglement
  8. HOROSCOPE WEEK OF JUNE 3: FRIENDSHIP
  9. Liquid Knowledge: On Israel and Palestine
  10. An Ode to the Aunties

Editor's Pick

Burnt Honey

: First tutorial of the year. When I open the door, I underestimate my strength, thinking it to be all used up in my journey here. It swings open violently and I trip into the room where awkward gazes greet me. Frozen, my legs are lead and I’m stuck on display for too long. My ov