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April 10, 2017 | by  | in News |
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Men might take some responsibility, for once in their lives

A breakthrough in male contraception has emerged from a university startup in rural India.

The procedure, which boasts 98% effectiveness, involves injecting a polymer gel into the testicles which damages sperm through a positive charge.

The procedure was invented by Sujoy Guha, a 76-year old Indian biomedical engineer. It is reversible and has no known side effects.

According to figures released by the United Nations, only 8% of women worldwide rely on their male partner using a condom for contraception. Guha sympathises with this, stating to a reporter, “why should the burden be borne by the female only? There has to be an equal partnership.”

There has been little interest from major pharmaceutical companies in funding the procedure. Herjan Coelingh Bennink, a gynecology professor who helped develop the contraceptives Implanon and Cerazette, blamed the gender makeup of these companies, saying “if those companies were run by women, it would be totally different.”

Guha licensed the technology to the Parsemus Foundation, a US-based nonprofit, to help establish a market outside India. He registered a startup, IcubedG Ideas Pvt., to pursue the technology domestically.

A recent study published by the University of Copenhagen confirmed the link between the contraceptive pill and depression, claiming that there was “a significant risk,” especially in teen users.

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