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May 15, 2017 | by  | in News |
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Bring Back Our Girls

82 school girls were released to Nigerian authorities by Boko Haram on May 6 after months of extensive negotiations between the government and the ISIS-affiliated terror group.

The girls were students at the Government Secondary School in Chibok, and were part of a larger group of 276 abducted by Boko Haram in April 2014. The 2014 kidnapping made headlines around the world, leading to the international Bring Back Our Girls campaign.

This latest release is the second to be negotiated with Boko Haram, bringing the total number of rescued students up to 163. 113 children presumed to be in captivity remain missing.

The negotiations were facilitated by the government of Switzerland and by the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), and involved a release of five Boko Haram leaders in exchange for the girls. The Nigerian government thanked the Swiss and the ICRC for their aid.

Yet, while many celebrated the release of the 82 girls, others stressed the need to focus on the remaining missing girls as well as the thousands of others in Boko Haram captivity.

Amnesty International’s Nigeria Director, Osai Ojigho, said in a press release that “the Nigerian authorities must now do more to ensure the safe return of the thousands of women and girls, as well as men and boys abducted by Boko Haram.”

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