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July 31, 2017 | by  | in Music |
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Lorde — Melodrama

When Lorde released her debut album Pure Heroine in 2013, the singer set herself up with a definitive sound that caught the world’s attention. Pure Heroine had a consistent flow filled with sparse beats, negative space, and layered vocals. After four years of waiting we finally have Melodrama, a testament to the growth, pain, loss, and change of growing up.

Melodrama opens with the single “Green Light”, a mismatched pop hit with a punchy drumline and synthpop influence, as Lorde delivers intimate and simple lyrics that hit straight in the core of heartbreak. While Melodrama holds very true to Lorde’s simple beats and breathless lyrical delivery, the 11-song album has much more to offer.

Throughout the early tracks we are treated to lines that detail lust and infatuation (“Hands under your t-shirt/ Know I think you’re awesome, right?”) before falling fast into insecurity and loss with Melodrama’s second single “Liability”, a delicate and introspective track relying solely on vocals and piano accompaniment.

The rest of the album is bursting with emotion as we listen through feelings of grief, spite, anger, and eventually redemption in the ninth track “Supercut” — a steadily building synthy pop song that looks back on the downfall of a relationship. “Supercut” stings with heartache while feeling strangely cathartic. To wrap up Melodrama is the single “Perfect Places” — an anthem-like pop tune that’s upbeat but raw, and celebrates these contradictory feelings.

I spent a long time waiting for Lorde’s second album and I was not disappointed. Melodrama plays from beginning to end like a whirlwind romance that I found myself swept up in. A testament to how much she has grown in the last fours years, Lorde has released another ripper of an album.

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