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Tōrangapū

This section ranks some policies from the different parties on issues that affect Te Ao Māori directly. The information was collated and summarised from political party websites to give a clear and concise summary of their focus towards these issues. The ranking system itself subjectively scores each political party out of ten on their strategies in dealing with these issues. We encourage you seek out more information on the policies themselves, and look at the wide range of other policies to develop your own understanding and opinion.

 

Te Reo Māori

 

National: The Education policy package invests $160 million over four years to provide schools and Communities of Learning with resources for second language learning, with “priority languages” including Te Reo Māori alongside “Mandarin, French, Spanish, Japanese, and Korean.” As an official language of New Zealand, Te Reo is given a special status under law as a language that can be used in any sector of government.

2

 

Labour: Labour’s Education Manifesto establishes optional Te Reo Māori classes in all secondary schools, and would provide early childhood and primary teachers an opportunity to learn Te Reo Māori. The policy would aim to respect Māori as tangata whenua, through a system that engages Māori language and culture.

5

 

Māori Party: The Māori Party has a targeted Te Reo Māori policy, which would establish Te Reo Māori and Māori history and culture as a subject in the school core curriculum; increase funding for Kōhanga Reo; fund two years full time Te Reo Māori course for one person in every non-speaking whānau; and increase overall funding for Māori medium education. The policy aims to maintain the survival of Māori language and ensure Māori students take pride in their history and culture.

10

 

Green: The Green Party’s Education policy would provide more funding for Te Reo Māori and immersion and bilingual programmes; introduce universal teaching of Te Reo Māori in all public  schools; and work towards tikanga Māori being available to all learners. The Inclusive Education policy calls for specific research into the needs of Māori and Pasifika children who require additional learning support.  The policies aim for language survival and the immersion of culture among Māori and non-Māori students.

8

 

NZ First: The Education policy would explore new ways to fund and deliver Kōhanga Reo and the Māori immersion early childhood education centres; and develop national curriculum guidelines for Te Reo Māori in immersion schools. The policy aims to maintain and develop parental involvement and network within the community towards Te Reo.

4

 

The Opportunities Party: The Democracy Reset policy would make Te Reo Māori compulsory in all primary schools. TOP believes that Te Reo Māori should be given the same rights as English, as it is an official language and vital to the understanding of Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

6

 

Mana Movement: Mana Movement have a targeted Te Reo Māori policy, supporting Te Reo Māori as a core subject in the New Zealand curriculum. They would increase funding and research in revitalisation strategies in schools such as Kura Kaupapa and Kōhanga Reo.

9

 

ACT: No mention of Te Reo Māori in education policies.

0

 

United Future: No mention of Te Reo Māori in education policies.

0

 

Te Tiriti o Waitangi (Te Tiriti)

 

National: No targeted policies. National plans to continue to conclude treaty settlements.

1

 

Labour: No targeted policies. In its Clean Rivers policy, Labour commits to work with iwi to settle treaty claims regarding water, recognising that Māori have a “special interest” in water.

2

 

New Zealand First: New Zealand First does not consider Te Tiriti to be an integral part of New Zealand’s constitution. They would hold a binding referendum on the abolition of Māori seats in Parliament and repeal all provisions in the Resource Management Act that require consultation with iwi, including for water consents and discharge consents. New Zealand First would continue to settle treaty claims.

-2

 

The Green Party: Under the Honouring Te Tiriti policy, the Green Party would entrench the Māori electorates; remove the ability for the public to override a council decision to create a Māori ward; undertake a comprehensive review of the Treaty settlement process and end “full and final” settlements; and remove the Crown’s “large natural groupings” approach to settlements, to respect smaller groups of iwi and hapū.

7

 

The Māori Party: In its Te Tiriti o Waitangi policy, The Māori Party would entrench Te Tiriti in all legislation, ensuring consistency of New Zealand legislation with its principles and empower the Waitangi Tribunal to make binding recommendations. The policy would implement a series legislative changes that recognise the status of Māori as tangata whenua and uphold the rights guaranteed to Māori in Te Tiriti. This would include the entrenchment of Māori seats in Parliament and removing the ability for the public to override a council decision to create a Māori ward. The Māori Party would also change the law to require Māori seats on all local government and on District Health Boards.

9

 

Mana Movement: Under its Constitution of Aotearoa policy, Mana Movement would create an entrenched written constitution, based on the work done by the Constitutional Transformation Working Party and the Mātike Mai Aotearoa Report. The policy recognises He Whakaputanga o Te Rangatiratanga o Nū Tīreni and Te Tiriti o Waitangi as the twin cornerstones of Aotearoa’s constitution.

10

 

The Opportunities Party: TOP is opposed to attempts to remove Māori electorates. In its Democracy Reset plan, TOP would establish an Upper House of Parliament with equal Māori representation and establish a written constitution, which would set out the rights and obligations provided in Te Tiriti.This would not have the power to veto law passed by the Lower House, but could recommend that it reconsider laws, particularly where constitutional rights may be at risk.

7

 

ACT: ACT do not mention Te Tiriti in their policies and do not believe in “legally privileged” Māori.

-2

 

United Future: Under its Constitution and Citizenship policy, United Future recognises consistency with Te Tiriti obligations as an important principle in “valuing the New Zealand identity.”

1

 

Water

 

National: The National Party brought in a range of freshwater management reforms in 2017 under the Clean Water package 2017. In these, National recognises the concept of Te Mana o te Wai, freshwater’s integral part in the social, cultural, economic, and environmental well-being of communities.

2

 

Labour: Under its Clean Rivers policy, Labour seek to restore the mauri of waterways through new freshwater quality standards and promoting of sustainable farming practice. Labour would increase funding for the Environmental Protection Agency in order to do so. The policy also provides that the Government would collect royalties for the commercial use of water.  Labour will “work with iwi to resolve Treaty water claims in a manner that respects iwi mana.”

5

 

United Future: The Freshwater policy would establish royalties on the commercial use of water, but does not provide for consultation with iwi.

0

 

The Opportunities Party: The Clear Water Action Plan would introduce a charge for the commercial use of water, and a “cap and trade” system for allocating rights to consume water. As a precondition of the policy, TOP has said that they would resolve issues of water ownership with regard to Te Tiriti. Water catchments will be assessed for the level of nitrate and other pollutants that the community and the taxpayer will tolerate. Businesses who produce pollutants above the sustainable level will be required to pay a penalty, and those below this level will be rewarded with a payment from the penalty pool.

6

 

The Green Party: Under its Protecting Drinking Water Policy, the Green party seeks to put an immediate $0.10 per litre levy on the sale and export of water, and develop a fair way to charge all commercial water users in light of Te Tiriti. “It will be up to the tangata whenua to decide exactly how they engage in the conversation and influence its outcomes.” The Resource Management (Clean Groundwater) Amendment Bill seeks to amends section six of the Resource Management Act 1991 to protect water quality and quantity in aquifers in the context of Māori water rights that are guaranteed under Te Tiriti.

7

 

ACT: ACT is specifically opposed to co-governance arrangements with iwi, including for water, particularly those that require formal consultation with iwi to determine freshwater management. ACT would introduce a market-based system for water use rights.

0

 

The Māori Party: He tāonga te wai policy plan seeks to protect freshwater and give it the status of tāonga in New Zealand Law. The policy would establish a Minister for Freshwater to prioritise issues of freshwater protection, rights and interests, and set up an annual Te Mana o Te Wai funding to support community projects. The Māori Party would impose a moratorium on the sale of water and raise the freshwater standard to “drinkable”, rather than “swimmable”.

10

 

Mana Movement: The Environment and Energy policies would require all environmental legislation to be drafted consistently with Te Tiriti o Waitangi and the principles of tino rangatiratanga and genuine consultation. This would ensure hapū and iwi are properly resourced to exercise kaitiakitanga over their rohe, and have equal authority to central and local government in developing environmental policies over all resources, including freshwater.

9

 

New Zealand First: The Environment and Conservation policy provides that Māori have a right to shared governance in some areas of water management; but states that Te Tiriti does not confer rights to Māori to take or use water which are greater or lesser than the rights of any other New Zealander.

3

 

Housing

 

National: No mention of Māori in housing policies. National want to address affordability of houses by building more houses faster. They want to continue creating special housing areas to “fast-track” the house building process, removing development requirements such as including consultation with public, iwi, or hapū.

0

 

Labour: The Better homes for Māori policy would reform loan schemes to increase the accessibility home loans for those who own land collectively as part of whānau trust, and establish a Māori Housing Unit within the Affordable Housing Authority.

3

 

The Māori Party: The Māori Party would create a Minister for Māori and Pacific Housing to address housing problems faced by “whanau/fanau/ainga”. They would also develop a National Housing Strategy according to the rights and interests of Māori under Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

8

 

The Green Party: The Home for Life policy would work with community housing providers and iwi to expand housing options, in addition to building more homes. A modified version of the rent-to-buy programme will be available to registered community housing providers. According to the policy, “Māori are disproportionately affected by the housing crisis, and we will work with iwi to turn this around.”

7

 

The Opportunities Party: No mention of Māori in housing policies. TOP want to tax income from assets and decrease income tax, restrict the conditions in which landlords can evict tenants, have a compulsory warrant of fitness, and give not-for-profit organisations Housing NZ.

1

 

United Future: No mention of Māori in housing policies. Their “Rent-to-Own” policy would have half of the newly built houses by the government would go under a rent-to-own programme. Similar to a hire purchase, part of rent payments would go towards savings for a deposit on the house.

1

 

Mana Movement: The Māori housing policy would increase fundings for Māori to build on Māori land; allow Māori to return to their papakainga without having their benefits cut; provide accessible loans for Māori first home buyers; and allow whānau to capitalise child benefits or use Kiwisaver as a first home deposit. Mana highlight Māori and Pasifika families as “disproportionately over-represented in the statistics of homelessness and poor housing.”

9

 

New Zealand First: The Māori Affairs policy would encourage Māori to build houses on collectively owned land and maintain zones of High Housing Need — such as Northland, East Coast, Eastern Bay of Plenty — with low deposit and interest.

4

 

ACT: No mention of Māori in housing policies.

0

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